Lyme Progress #5 Trends

ILADS has taken the bold step from staying under the radar to leading the way to better LYME treatment. Today many “expert” Lyme doctors are training Medical doctors to recognize Lyme, basic treatment with written treatment guidelines. You can download the Treatment Guidelines yourself, I look forward to reading.  In theory it sounds good for Lyme suffers looking for a diagnosis. […]

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Lyme Progress #4 *Photos*

 It’s summertime, ticks and insects carrying tick born illnesses are worse than last year. Practice all precautions if out in tall grass, tall scrubs or trees. I’m in semi-remission which consist of Dementia, Fibromyalgia, Neuropathy, Lyme Arthritis, Cognitive issues, pain, falling, pain and pain medicines. There are days you want to cry, scream, on and on. Chronic Illnesses can consume […]

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Lyme Progress #1 Pain Management

You may have noticed the name change from Lyme Update to Lyme Progress. The reason for the change, it’s time to start looking forward, short term and long term. I still struggle with illnesses which Lyme left behind and have days can’t get out of bed. WINNING is looking forward. The chronically ill understand this mind-set. After dismissing my Lyme […]

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Celebrate with Me, Yesterday I…..

Most know I have Chronic Lyme Diseases, ill for several years and still house bound. I didn’t realize until recently I had developed Agoraphobia created an additional challenge getting behind the wheel. Lyme Diseases left me with early onset of Dementia, my balance is not the best and remembering is my biggest challenge. I’m taking medicine for Dementia and have seen improvement. […]

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The Asp Wrangler For A Day

The Asp Wrangler For A Day        Summer and searing heat are just ahead, it’s time to introduce you to the Texas Asp. One morning while pruning roses I noticed these furry cream-colored caterpillars. I grabbed my camera and started clicking. Something about them was familiar, I just could not put my finger on it. I had taken photos of critters all week so my husband was not surprised I discovered something new. Curiosity got the best of me, I had to see what kind of caterpillar they were. I had thoughts of beautiful butterflies flying around my yard. To my surprise and horror they were Asp! If you are not from the South you can’t fully appreciate the terror growing within. It is close to impossible to kill them. When you get stung by an Asp it’s like having acid poured on you. Their hairs can get imbedded in the skin and every time you touch the area it’s like a new dose of acid. When I was a kid one fell from the porch ceiling at my grandparents house. It fell down the back of my shirt. I was screaming and crying so hard it was difficult to stop to tell granny something was on my back. They leave a mark that looks like a branding iron. My back looked like red tire tracks. With this memory I had to go out the next morning a […]

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New Chapter in My Life Begins

I’ve started to walk again, it fells great and very unstable. Throughout my battle with Lyme I prayed for my Granny’s strength. My Granny had to learn to walk twice as an adult. The first was from a terrible accident leaving her in a wheelchair or walker for years. She cleaned new houses for extra money, whatever the job required […]

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Wapama Falls on Hetch Hetchy Trail, Yosemite

  Wapama Falls (1,400 feet) Flows: all year, with peak flow in May. Relatively few people visit Hetch Hetchy Valley to see this roaring waterfall. In some springs, the water from this fall flows over the footbridges near its base. You can see this waterfall from the parking lot at O’Shaughnessy Dam or you can hike on an uneven trail to near its base (see a list of Hetch Hetchy day hikes).

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Yosemite National Park: Half Dome

  Wild Wild West by Melinda https://www.nps.gov/media/video/view.htm?id=6F8A61D7-E3B5-F2FD-0E7E5921833F1954 The summit of Half Dome is a dangerous place during a lightning storm. Check the weather forecast before your hike and try to reach the summit early in the day to avoid thunderstorms, which are more common in the afternoon (but can occur at any time). If a storm appears nearby, do not continue to the summit and, if in the summit area, leave the area (while still using caution when descending the cables and steps). The summit is typically 15°F (8°C) to 20°F (11°C) cooler than Yosemite Valley and windy conditions are common. Be prepared for cool temperatures and rain showers. Black bears frequent Yosemite’s Wilderness and are adept at grabbing backpacks from hikers and campers–during both day and night. Always keep your food within arm’s reach (or on your back); never leave it unattended. If you see a bear, act immediately to scare it away: make as much noise as possible by yelling. If there is more than one person, stand together to present a more intimidating figure, but do not surround the bear. Squirrels, Steller’s jays, chipmunks, and other animals also live along the trail; never feed them or allow them to get your food. Do not leave your pack unattended (e.g., at the base of the cables or while you take a swim or nap). Keep wildlife wild: respect them from a distance. Improper food storage and feeding of […]

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