Redeem Therapeutics High Quality Tested CBD Products

Photo by Harrison Haines on Pexels.com

I’ve been using the Redeem Therapeutics Spray 750mg Hemp Extract in the mint flavor for several months now, I love the flavor and the consistency of the spray. I’ve tried oils and dislike the oily residue left behind. The spray does not leave any residue behind and has a light mint flavor. I believe you can also purchase original flavor.

I believe in their products so much I give the oil to my pets and they lick up it up like a special treat. I was concerned at first if they would like the flavor but the mix Redeem uses works great.

Feeling as strongly as I do about their products, I decided to become an Affiliate. This means when you use my affiliate link and purchase Redeem Therapeutics products you help support my daily coffee fix. If the Redeem Therapeutics products were good enough for George Harrison they are good enough for me.

I hope you will check out their website and see for yourself the selection of quality tested CBD products Redeem Therapeutics has to offer.

Please use my Affiliate link, Thank you.

https://redeemrx.com/?rfsn=3983838.88b224

Melinda Sandor

 

Who We Are


We, the Redeem Team, are a group of experienced scientists, entrepreneurs, farmers, and friends teaming up to put forth safe, effective, and consistent CBD products. Our goal is to provide the highest quality natural alternatives, refined by science, to improve your (and our) health and wellness.

We straddle two worlds–natural alternatives and big pharma. Our unique perspective is formed by the scientific discipline of more than 60 years in the pharmaceutical industry and our intuitive understanding, passion, and experiences with natural remedies. We have set out to bridge the gap between nature and science, and we do it with truth and transparency.

Grown by nature, perfected by science, we are Redeem Therapeutics

HOW WE GOT HERE

In 2013, George, a close friend of the Redeem Team, was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and gave us a call to discuss his thoughts on natural courses of treatment. Backed by his own diligent research, George was adamant about his choice to rely on natural remedies. Given our collective background in pharmaceuticals, his decision seemed unrealistic to us at the time. We were skeptical at best. Our research began in hopes of finding information to steer him in another direction; but ironically, we found exactly the opposite.

Our team uncovered numerous studies on cannabis-based cancer treatments that statistically showed the same or better survival results than traditional post-surgery chemotherapy.

Study after study showed that although using cannabis as a form of treatment might sound like quackery in the U.S., much of the world recognizes cannabis-based treatments as equally effective or more effective than traditional chemotherapy regimens. In fact, many countries require insurance to cover cannabis treatments for chronic pain and targeted destruction of cancer cells, just as they would other approved chemotherapies.

Our research led us on a journey of discovery. On this journey, we came to recognize one of cannabis’s most intriguing compounds, cannabidiol (CBD), and the potential benefits it carries for several conditions. Many peer-reviewed scientific papers evidenced the therapeutic benefits of CBD. Due to the federal government’s classification of CBD as a schedule 1 substance, most research had been carried out overseas in places like Israel and Europe. Early studies on animals were promising, leading to effective human clinical results for the treatment of epilepsy and pain, both with and without THC.

Concurrent with our rising excitement about CBD, the 2014 Farm Bill was approved. This allowed research and limited commercial production of CBD products. As commercial products began to appear, we couldn’t help but notice that inconsistencies in farming practices, hemp handling, and manufacturing processes often provided unbalanced formulations.

The CBD market was flooded with substandard products.

Much of the initial concern regarding low-quality products seemed to be over the lack of CBD potency. The FDA randomly tested CBD tinctures and found that the majority were grossly under the stated concentration of CBD. In fact, some contain no CBD at all. Others confused Hemp Seed Oil, which does not contain CBD, with true hemp extract from the hemp flower, which is the only source of CBD. While the lack of potency concerned us, we were fearful of the potential for serious harm caused by contamination with pesticides, residual extraction solvents, and fungus derived toxins (aflatoxins)–not to mention our concerns about the general lack of documentation, processing controls, and adequate testing (cGMP). Put simply, we were truly alarmed. We found our calling! And, Redeem was formed.

REDEEM TODAY

Combining more than 60 years of scientific experience and the power of natural remedies, we create an extremely effective and trustworthy line of products to improve health and wellbeing. Redeem bridges the gap between natural alternatives and pharmaceutical precision. Redeem Therapeutics manufactures CBD using organically certified hemp and highly controlled processes to guarantee a safe, effective product made with transparency, consistency, and balance every single time!

Hemp Trails

I’ve been using CBD oil, sprays, gummies, gels caps, and vaping for several years. I can’t say that I’ve noticed a difference in my pain. It’s hard to say since pain changes day to day.

So, I decided to buy bulk Hemp buds and rolled smokes.

The first thing I did was smoke one of the rolled smokes, easy, just me and a lighter. It’s scary how quickly I was holding the smoke just like I held my cigarettes. I sat outside enjoying the fresh air getting some Vitamin D and smoking. No smoking allowed in the house.

The first thing I noticed is the acid feelings in my lungs like when I smoked cigarettes. I don’t know what I expected but I quess my mind went back to my pot smoking days, I don’t recall those days being so harsh on the lungs. Maybe age has a big difference.

I looked around at what to buy for smoking and decided on a pipe, good ole grandpa pipe. The package came with filters, pipe cleaners, tool to clean ashes out of and screens for the bottom of pipe.

This morning I took the pipe and put two clumps of hemp in there and went outside for fresh air and a smoke. I was surprised how long the buds lasted, I didn’t break them down, I just put straight into pipe.

The smoke in the lungs was a little better but not enough to convince me to continue to smoke after this purchase is complete. I’ll be going back to oils, gel caps, sprays and vaping. My mind is still open and look forward to the day Texas legalizes majaruana, but hell may freeze over before that happens.

Melinda

Here’s the truth about CBD, from a cannabis researcher

IDEAS.TED.COM

Sep 23, 2019 / Jeffrey Chen, MD

iStock

Is CBD a cure-all — or snake oil? Jeffrey Chen, executive director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, explains the science behind the cannabis product.

CBD gummies. CBD shots in your latte. CBD dog biscuits. From spas to drug stores, supermarkets to cafes, wherever you go in the US today, you’re likely to see products infused with CBD. There are cosmetics, vape pens, pills and, of course, the extract itself; there are even CBD-containing sexual lubricants for women which aim to reduce pelvic pain or enhance sensation. CBD has been hailed by some users as having cured their pain, anxiety, insomnia, depression or seizures, and it’s been touted by advertisers as a supplement that can treat all of the above and combat aging and chronic disease.

As Executive Director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, I’m dedicated to unearthing the scientific truth — the good and the bad — behind cannabis and CBD. My interest was sparked in 2014 when I was a medical student at UCLA, and I discovered a parent successfully treating her child’s severe epilepsy with CBD. I was surprised and intrigued. Despite California legalizing medical cannabis in 1996, we weren’t taught anything about cannabis or CBD in med school. I did research and found other families and children like Charlotte Figi reporting success with CBD, and I knew it was something that needed to be investigated. I established Cannabis Research Initiative in the fall of 2017, and today we have more than 40 faculty members across 18 departments and 8 schools at UCLA working on cannabis research, education and patient-care projects.

So what exactly is CBD and where does it come from? CBD is short for cannabidiol, one of the compounds in the cannabinoid family which, in nature, is found only in the cannabis plant (its official scientific name is Cannabis sativa l.). THC — short for tetrahydrocannabinoid — is the other highly abundant cannabinoid present in cannabis that’s used today. THC and CBD exert their effects in part by mimicking or boosting levels of endocannabinoids, chemical compounds that are naturally produced by humans and found throughout our bodies. Endocannabinoids play an important role in regulating mood, memory, appetite, stress, sleep, metabolism, immune function, pain sensation, and reproduction.

Despite the fact that they’re both cannabinoids found only in the cannabis plant, THC and CBD are polar opposites in many ways. THC is intoxicatingand responsible for the “high” of cannabis, but CBD has no such effect. THC is addictive; CBD is not addictive and even appears to have some anti-addictive effects against compounds like opioids. While THC stimulates the human appetite, CBD does not. There are areas where they overlap — in preliminary animal studies, THC and CBD exhibit some similar effects, including pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory properties and anti-oxidant and neuroprotective effects. In some early research, they’ve even shown the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells, but years of rigorous studies need to be conducted before we’ll know whether they have the same impact on humans.

Even though humans have been using cannabis for thousands of years, the products available today are not the cannabis that has traditionally been consumed. After cannabis was prohibited at the federal level in 1970 by the US Controlled Substances Act, illicit growers were incentivized to breed strains that had higher amounts of THC, so they could increase their profits without needing larger growing spaces. What they didn’t know was that by driving up THC content, they were dramatically reducing the CBD content. In 1995, after decades of surreptitious breeding, the ratio of THC to CBD was ~15:1, and by 2014 the ratio had jumped to ~80:1 as CBD content further plummeted.

Due to decades of research restrictions in the US and growers’ focus on THC, there are very few human studies that look at CBD and its effects. The strongest evidence we have is that CBD can reduce the frequency of seizures in certain rare pediatric disorders — so much that a CBD-based drug called Epidiolex was FDA-approved in 2018 for this purpose. There is also preliminary human data from small clinical trials with dozens of subjects that suggests CBD may have the potential to be used for conditions like anxietyschizophreniaopioid addiction, and Parkinson’s disease. But please note that the participants in these studies generally received several hundreds of milligrams of CBD a day, meaning the 5mg to 25mg of CBD per serving in popular CBD products may likely be inadequate. And even if you took dozens of servings to reach the dosage used in these clinical trials, there is still no guarantee of benefit because of how preliminary these findings are.

But while there is a lack of concrete and conclusive evidence about CBD’s effects, there is considerable hope. Recent legislative changes around hemp and CBD in the US and across the world have enabled numerous human clinical trials to begin, investigating the use of CBD for conditions such as autism, chronic pain, mood disorders, alcohol use disorder, Crohn’s disease, graft-versus-host-disease, arthritis and cancer- and cancer-treatment-related side effects such as nausea, vomiting and pain. The results of these studies should become available over the next five years.

Furthermore, in an effort to protect consumers, the FDA has announced that it will soon issue and enforce regulations on all CBD products. Buyers should beware because the products being sold today may contain contaminants or have inaccurately labelled CBD content — due to the deluge of CBD products on the market, government agencies haven’t been able to react quickly enough so there is currently no regulation in the US whatsoever on CBD products.

While CBD appears to be generally safe, it still has side effects. In children suffering from severe epilepsy, high doses of CBD have caused reactions such as sleepiness, vomiting and diarrhea. However, we don’t know if this necessarily applies to adults using CBD because these children were very sick and on many medications, and the equivalent dose for an average 154-pound adult would be a whopping 1400 mg/day. And while CBD use in the short term (from weeks to months) has been shown to be safe, we have no data on what side effects might be present with chronic use (from months to years).

Right now, the most significant side effect of CBD we’ve seen is its interaction with other drugs. CBD impacts how the human liver breaks down other drugs, which means it can elevate the blood levels of other prescription medications that people are taking — and thus increase the risk of experiencing their side effects. And women who are pregnant or who are expecting to be should be aware of this: We don’t know if CBD is safe for the fetus during pregnancy.

So where does this leave us? Unfortunately, outside of certain rare pediatric seizure disorders, we scientists do not have solid data on whether CBD can truly help the conditions that consumers are flocking to it for — conditions like insomnia, depression and pain. And even if it did, we still need to figure out the right dose and delivery form. Plus, CBD is not without side effects. Here’s the advice that I give to my friends and family: If you’re using CBD (or thinking about using it), please research products and talk to your doctor so they can monitor you for side effects and interactions with any other drugs you take.

So is CBD a panacea or a placebo? The answer is: Neither. CBD is an under-investigated compound that has the potential to benefit many conditions. While it does have side effects, it appears as if it could be a safer alternative to highly addictive drugs such as opioids or benzodiazepines. And thanks to a recent surge in research, we’ll be learning a lot more about its capabilities and limits in the next five years.

Watch his TEDxPershingSq talk now: 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jeffrey Chen, MD , is the founder and Executive Director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative where he leads an interdisciplinary group of 40+ UCLA faculty conducting cannabis related research, education and patient care. You can follow him @drjeffchen or visit his website http://www.drjeffchen.com.

Here’s the truth about CBD, from a cannabis researcher

IDEAS.TED.COM

Sep 23, 2019 / Jeffrey Chen, MD

Is CBD a cure-all — or snake oil? Jeffrey Chen, executive director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, explains the science behind the cannabis product.

CBD gummies. CBD shots in your latte. CBD dog biscuits. From spas to drug stores, supermarkets to cafes, wherever you go in the US today, you’re likely to see products infused with CBD. There are cosmetics, vape pens, pills and, of course, the extract itself; there are even CBD-containing sexual lubricants for women which aim to reduce pelvic pain or enhance sensation. CBD has been hailed by some users as having cured their pain, anxiety, insomnia, depression or seizures, and it’s been touted by advertisers as a supplement that can treat all of the above and combat aging and chronic disease.

As Executive Director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, I’m dedicated to unearthing the scientific truth — the good and the bad — behind cannabis and CBD. My interest was sparked in 2014 when I was a medical student at UCLA, and I discovered a parent successfully treating her child’s severe epilepsy with CBD. I was surprised and intrigued. Despite California legalizing medical cannabis in 1996, we weren’t taught anything about cannabis or CBD in med school. I did research and found other families and children like Charlotte Figi reporting success with CBD, and I knew it was something that needed to be investigated. I established Cannabis Research Initiative in the fall of 2017, and today we have more than 40 faculty members across 18 departments and 8 schools at UCLA working on cannabis research, education and patient-care projects.

So what exactly is CBD and where does it come from? CBD is short for cannabidiol, one of the compounds in the cannabinoid family which, in nature, is found only in the cannabis plant (its official scientific name is Cannabis sativa l.). THC — short for tetrahydrocannabinoid — is the other highly abundant cannabinoid present in cannabis that’s used today. THC and CBD exert their effects in part by mimicking or boosting levels of endocannabinoids, chemical compounds that are naturally produced by humans and found throughout our bodies. Endocannabinoids play an important role in regulating mood, memory, appetite, stress, sleep, metabolism, immune function, pain sensation, and reproduction.

Despite the fact that they’re both cannabinoids found only in the cannabis plant, THC and CBD are polar opposites in many ways. THC is intoxicatingand responsible for the “high” of cannabis, but CBD has no such effect. THC is addictive; CBD is not addictive and even appears to have some anti-addictive effects against compounds like opioids. While THC stimulates the human appetite, CBD does not. There are areas where they overlap — in preliminary animal studies, THC and CBD exhibit some similar effects, including pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory properties and anti-oxidant and neuroprotective effects. In some early research, they’ve even shown the ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells, but years of rigorous studies need to be conducted before we’ll know whether they have the same impact on humans.

Even though humans have been using cannabis for thousands of years, the products available today are not the cannabis that has traditionally been consumed. After cannabis was prohibited at the federal level in 1970 by the US Controlled Substances Act, illicit growers were incentivized to breed strains that had higher amounts of THC, so they could increase their profits without needing larger growing spaces. What they didn’t know was that by driving up THC content, they were dramatically reducing the CBD content. In 1995, after decades of surreptitious breeding, the ratio of THC to CBD was ~15:1, and by 2014 the ratio had jumped to ~80:1 as CBD content further plummeted.

Due to decades of research restrictions in the US and growers’ focus on THC, there are very few human studies that look at CBD and its effects. The strongest evidence we have is that CBD can reduce the frequency of seizures in certain rare pediatric disorders — so much that a CBD-based drug called Epidiolex was FDA-approved in 2018 for this purpose. There is also preliminary human data from small clinical trials with dozens of subjects that suggests CBD may have the potential to be used for conditions like anxietyschizophreniaopioid addiction, and Parkinson’s disease. But please note that the participants in these studies generally received several hundreds of milligrams of CBD a day, meaning the 5mg to 25mg of CBD per serving in popular CBD products may likely be inadequate. And even if you took dozens of servings to reach the dosage used in these clinical trials, there is still no guarantee of benefit because of how preliminary these findings are.

But while there is a lack of concrete and conclusive evidence about CBD’s effects, there is considerable hope. Recent legislative changes around hemp and CBD in the US and across the world have enabled numerous human clinical trials to begin, investigating the use of CBD for conditions such as autism, chronic pain, mood disorders, alcohol use disorder, Crohn’s disease, graft-versus-host-disease, arthritis and cancer- and cancer-treatment-related side effects such as nausea, vomiting and pain. The results of these studies should become available over the next five years.

Furthermore, in an effort to protect consumers, the FDA has announced that it will soon issue and enforce regulations on all CBD products. Buyers should beware because the products being sold today may contain contaminants or have inaccurately labelled CBD content — due to the deluge of CBD products on the market, government agencies haven’t been able to react quickly enough so there is currently no regulation in the US whatsoever on CBD products.

While CBD appears to be generally safe, it still has side effects. In children suffering from severe epilepsy, high doses of CBD have caused reactions such as sleepiness, vomiting and diarrhea. However, we don’t know if this necessarily applies to adults using CBD because these children were very sick and on many medications, and the equivalent dose for an average 154-pound adult would be a whopping 1400 mg/day. And while CBD use in the short term (from weeks to months) has been shown to be safe, we have no data on what side effects might be present with chronic use (from months to years).

Right now, the most significant side effect of CBD we’ve seen is its interaction with other drugs. CBD impacts how the human liver breaks down other drugs, which means it can elevate the blood levels of other prescription medications that people are taking — and thus increase the risk of experiencing their side effects. And women who are pregnant or who are expecting to be should be aware of this: We don’t know if CBD is safe for the fetus during pregnancy.

So where does this leave us? Unfortunately, outside of certain rare pediatric seizure disorders, we scientists do not have solid data on whether CBD can truly help the conditions that consumers are flocking to it for — conditions like insomnia, depression and pain. And even if it did, we still need to figure out the right dose and delivery form. Plus, CBD is not without side effects. Here’s the advice that I give to my friends and family: If you’re using CBD (or thinking about using it), please research products and talk to your doctor so they can monitor you for side effects and interactions with any other drugs you take.

So is CBD a panacea or a placebo? The answer is: Neither. CBD is an under-investigated compound that has the potential to benefit many conditions. While it does have side effects, it appears as if it could be a safer alternative to highly addictive drugs such as opioids or benzodiazepines. And thanks to a recent surge in research, we’ll be learning a lot more about its capabilities and limits in the next five years.

Watch his TEDxPershingSq talk now: 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jeffrey Chen, MD , is the founder and Executive Director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative where he leads an interdisciplinary group of 40+ UCLA faculty conducting cannabis related research, education and patient care. You can follow him @drjeffchen or visit his website http://www.drjeffchen.com.

What Does Science Say About CBD Oil & Migraines? — Invisibly Me

Today I wanted to share an intriguing guest post that will likely be relevant to a lot of you out there who, like myself, struggle with migraines. CBD oil is an interesting topic as so many people now are reporting benefits, so what does the science say about its role in helping migraines? CBD oil […]

via What Does Science Say About CBD Oil & Migraines? — Invisibly Me

Vaping, CBD Oil, Gummies and Kraton

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Last week I expanded my CBD options from oil to qummies and vaping (supplements and cream are in route). I purchased two packages of Kraton, still researching before I put in my body. National Geographic and Anthony Burdain with The Travel Channel went deep in the rainforest and others places only reached by boat. The locals ate leaves which took them higher than high. They offered crew a small amount of leaf to eat, as the effects hit the crew, the locals were laughing.

I have not tried Kraton yet, more research is needed before it goes in my body. The gummies are 2500mg and very sweet, the oil takes at least six months, so I’ll let you know on that. Vaping was very interesting, as a reformed smoker it was strange to puff in the CBD. From what I can see in my limited time is there are very CBD products to the expensive. My goal is to learn the differences and not waste money on nice packaging. I bought three vaps for $25 dollars, see in the photo, each is used for desired result.

I also bought one vap for $60, the expected outcome for pain. One difference was evident right away, the taste. The lower priced ones smelled terrible and left a horrible taste in your mouth. The $60 Wildflavor Vap taste great, left no smell in the house and even my husband agreed I could smoke it in the house.