MANAGING FIBROMYALGIA IN CHILDREN

Welcome to Remedy, a blog by U.S. Pain Foundation. Remedy aims to provide people with the support they need to thrive despite chronic pain. It features the information about promising treatments, tips and strategies for self-management, resources for coping with the emotional and social effects of pain, unique perspectives from patients, clinicians, and caregivers–and much more. To submit an article idea, email contact@uspainfoundation.org. Posted: January 14, 2019   By Brent Wells, DC, a chiropractor and founder of Better Health Chiropractic and Physical Rehab If your child feels tired and achy, you may not worry initially. After all, there’s nothing urgent about what seems to be mild, general discomfort. However, if your child is constantly in pain, exhausted, having trouble sleeping, and experiencing intense moods, he/she may have fibromyalgia. This condition is fairly common in adults, but parents and clinicians may overlook the possibility of juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome — that is, fibromyalgia in children. JUVENILE FIBROMYALGIA SYMPTOMS TO WATCH OUT FOR Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by pain and fatigue. According to experts, children will often describe this pain as “stiffness, tightness, tenderness, burning or aching.” This pain can last for months and is often accompanied by other symptoms that affect a child’s overall well-being, energy level, and emotional health, including: Tender spots on muscles Difficulty sleeping and fatigue Aches, including stomachaches and headaches Lack of focus or memory Anxiety and depression If your child is experiencing these symptoms, you should […]

Read More →

Using Essential Oils to Ease Headache Pain

  Spring 2019 Willow & Sage by Stamptington Headaches fall into four categories-migraine, tension, sinus, or sugar and each category can be treated with essential oils to ease the pain. A migraine is often caused by insomnia, stress, anxiety, or hormonal changes, while a tension headache usually comes from stress or strain. A sinus headache occurs when the nasal passages […]

Read More →

New Insights into the Genetics of Depression

February 4, 2019 By 23andMe under 23andMe Research   In the largest genetic study of its kind, scientists have identified more than 200 genes associated with depression that could give new insights to researchers looking for treatments to what is the leading cause of disability in the world.     Combining anonymous data from more than two million people who […]

Read More →

Fibro Friday: Hamster Wheel

Repost I’ve struggled with Chronic Lyme, Fibromyalgia, and Dementia for six years, every week it’s a follow-up or test for the latest ailment. I’ve made the decision to step off the Doctor Hamster Wheel in 2019. I saw a Rheumatologist two months ago, the clueless PA told me there wasn’t Lyme in Texas. REALLY? The doctor named a few possible illnesses and took my blood. The doctor’s visit was a bust but the lab work revealed my Calcium is high. Which can cause serious complications? She suggested having my Parathyroid checked. WOW, something came out of the lab work, I have another ailment to deal with! I saw the Endocrinologist, it was straight forward. A blood test, a scan at the hospital and possible surgery. We scheduled the scan immediately since it was affecting my heart. I fell down the stairs and banged myself up a good one. I landed a perfect 10! NO, I can’t lean my head back for two forty-five minute sessions. The test was rescheduled. 2019 is starting like the other six years, with a heart test scheduled, a Parathyroid scan with possible surgery, and a test for Traumatic Brain Injury from the fall. There are a few days left in 2018, I want to know who I am, how have I changed in that time. I developed Agoraphobia, haven’t driven in six years and have only seen the inside of doctor’s offices. I took the first step […]

Read More →

Celebrity Friday Quotes

“Too many people are buying things they can’t afford, with money that they don’t have… to impress people that they don’t like!” Nothing to do w/ “books” — Just like the quote!” ― Will Smith   “I don’t like to share my personal life… it wouldn’t be personal if I shared it.” ― George Clooney   “What’s the whole point […]

Read More →

When a Patient Dies by Suicide — The Physician’s Silent Sorrow

New England Journal of Medicine January 24, 2019 Dinah Miller, M.D. We talk about the toll suicide takes on families and the tragedy for the people who’ve died. What we don’t openly talk about is suicide’s toll on the doctors who have treated these patients. But when a patient dies by suicide, it leaves us profoundly changed. The news came by text as we drove home from brunch. My patient had died that morning by suicide. I read the text and wailed. My husband was driving, and our adult children happened to be away, traveling together on an exotic journey. I struggled to gather words, and my husband held control of the car through those excruciating moments when he thought something horrible had happened to our kids. I calmed down enough to tell him that the tragedy involved a patient. He was relieved. I was not. U.S. suicide rates increased by 25.4% between 1999 and 2016.1 It’s been estimated that at least half of psychiatrists will lose at least one patient to suicide during their career.2 There are no estimates on how many primary care physicians will have the same experience, though they often treat psychiatric disorders. Among people who complete suicide in the United States, 46% have been diagnosed with a mental health condition, and many more people have undiagnosed mental illness. We talk about the toll suicide takes on families. They experience grief, guilt, regret, anguish, anger, and stigma, […]

Read More →

Coordination of Care or Conflict of Interest? Exempting ACOs from the Stark Law

New England Journal of Medicine Perspective Genevieve P. Kanter, Ph.D. and Mark V. Pauly, Ph.D. Suppose you are a Medicare-insured patient with coronary artery disease. You will visit, on average, 10 physicians at six practice sites in a given year.1 Such fragmentation of care has spurred efforts by health care systems and payers to coordinate the delivery of care by multiple providers in a range of settings. Hospitals and physician practices are merging at increasing rates to form integrated delivery systems with the goal of delivering harmonized services across the continuum of care — from initial primary care visit to hospital admission to nursing facility discharge. In addition, under the Affordable Care Act, hospitals and physician groups are encouraged to form accountable care organizations (ACOs) that jointly contract to deliver care to specified populations of Medicare beneficiaries. Care coordination has become a central theme of new payment and delivery systems and is believed to be an indispensable strategy for eliminating delivery inefficiencies, controlling costs, and improving outcomes. There is, however, at least one downside to care coordination arrangements: they clash with existing regulations on financial conflicts of interest in medicine. This set of regulations, collectively known as the Stark law, prohibits physicians from referring patients to providers when a financial arrangement would allow the referring physician to benefit from such a referral. For example, physicians who have a profit-sharing agreement with a nursing home are prohibited from referring their Medicare and […]

Read More →

Guest Post with Harry Cline from newcaregiver.org

When it comes to Caregiving you may have questions regarding the options like where to live, type of facility or helping your loved one remain at home. Questions like Government benefits, health insurance, home care, and the never-ending questions that continue as your loved one ages. Please welcome Author Harry Cline of The New Caregiver’s Comprehensive Resource: Advice, Tips, and […]

Read More →