Easy To Make Calming Oil

Willow and Sage by Stampington This combination smells lovely and helps to soothe anxious feelings. You can keep one in your purse to have on hand throughout the day. YOU WILL NEED Carrier oil: fractionated coconut oil/grapeseed oil/jojoba oil Glass roller bottle 10-ml. 6 drops lavender essential oil 6 drops orange essential oil 6 drops patchouli essential oil 4 drops […]

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Things You Can Do to Stay Mentally Healthy During Self-Isolation — Guest Blogger Damon Ashworth Psychology

With the COVID-19 pandemic, we are now being told that the most helpful thing we can do is stay at home and remain physically distant from others. Unless you are in an essential profession, this could be a time to slow down. To check in with those that you care most about. To chat for longer and to connect emotionally. To reflect on your life and rediscover what really matters to you. To hope and dream and plan for a better future. And to try things that you otherwise may not have had the chance or the time to do. Things You Can Do to Stay Mentally Healthy During Self-Isolation — Damon Ashworth Psychology

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Yale's Popular Happiness Class Is Now Available Online for Free — Here's What It Entails

The course, taught by psychology professor Laurie Santos, focuses on understanding happiness in life By  Eric Todisco March 24, 2020 10:55 AM Yale University has the perfect solution to keeping happiness alive amid the trying times of the coronavirus pandemic. The Connecticut-based Ivy League college is making its widely-popular “happiness” course available online for free via Coursera. According to Yale’s news site, the online […]

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Self-Care for Teens: a Boon for Mental Health

US News  Raychelle Cassada Lohmann, ContributorFeb. 10, 2020 TEENS ARE GETTING TOO little sleep, not enough exercise and spending far too much time online. Research tells us so (if you need proof), and it’s also clear that when teens don’t take care of themselves, it can affect their mental health. (FUSE/GETTY IMAGES) That’s all the more reason parents should teach their […]

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What Is Coronavirus (COVID- 19)?

It’s impossible to talk about travel right now without addressing coronavirus. As the COVID-19 virus continues to spread, sharing accurate information is crucial to both help stem fear and arm ourselves and our loved ones with knowledge. For this reason, we have created a guide on coronavirus, informed by reliable sources like the CDC and World Health Organization. Stay safe […]

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MIGRAINE DISEASES MAKES NATIONAL HEADLINES

March 3, 2020/ U.S. Pain Foundation Headache and migraine diseases captured attention nationally throughout February thanks to features on ABC’s Good Morning America, CBS’s Sunday Morning Show, and PBS’s NewsHour. Members of the INvisible Project were highlighted on all three stations. On Feb. 25, Dr. William B. Young, a headache specialist at Jefferson Headache Center and contributing writer for the INvisible Project, discussed the reality and […]

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What is Hypogammaglobulinemia?

I’ve recently been diagnosed with the immune disorder Hypogammaglobulinemia which requires the expertise of an Endocrinologist doctor. My doctor isn’t sure how I contracted since I don’t fit any of the noted categories. My thoughts are it’s either my Lithium which I’ve taken for over 35 years or a result of Lyme Diseases. Lyme may sound like a stretch or crazy but one of the first things my PA told me is since Lyme has no cure and the virus is live in your body you will get other illnesses over time. So far she has been right. I have Fibromyalgia and full-body arthritis. Lyme isn’t a stretch to me. We’ll see as more testing is done. Like Lyme infusion treatment is necessary, some require only one treatment and others require ongoing infusion treatment. Hearing this makes me think of the nine months I spent on IV Infusion Therapy for Lyme. I am remaining optimistic only one injection will be needed. I’ll keep you posted and I learn more from the additional testing and meeting the Endocrinologist. Melinda Overview Hypogammaglobulinemia is a problem with the immune system that prevents it from making enough antibodies called immunoglobulins. Antibodies are proteins that help your body recognize and fight off foreign invaders like bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Without enough antibodies, you’re more likely to get infections. People with hypogammaglobulinemia can more easily catch pneumonia, meningitis, and other infections that a healthy immune system […]

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About Coronavirus and Lyme

published 3/4/20 About Coronavirus (Covid-19) and Lyme Many people with and without Lyme are fearful of Coronavirus also called Covid-19. In my Seattle Lyme practice, I am answering questions about what one should do to protect themselves and to boost their immune systems. Many wonder if immune dysregulation, caused by Lyme, increases their chances of acquiring the virus, having a […]

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Does CBD Topical Pain Cream Work?

I have been trying CBD products over the past two years but have not used topicals, not sure why but this week changed everything. I didn’t use the Redeem brand even though I did buy their Spray CBD. I had used several samples of topical CBD and that is not enough to know if relief can be found. I have […]

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Touched by Suicide

Twenty-eight years ago my father killed himself, I was twenty-eight years old. It’s strange that my father has been dead as long as he was alive in my life. I’ve written about his suicide many times over the years but this year feels different. It’s hard to put into words but I’ll share what words come to mind. I knew […]

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Male Survivor Big Changes Coming

Since its founding 25 years ago, MaleSurvivor has played a leadership role in advocating for male survivors who have experienced sex abuse in any context, either as children or adults. Here’s a quick update:We’re planning our next major conference for 2021. It will mirror our groundbreaking series of biennial conferences that were available in years past. These events featured programs designed […]

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Homemade Makeup Remover

Willow and Sage by Stampington By Amy Knight You Will Need Carrier oil Dark Cloth To Use Dampen face with warm water. Apply small amount of oil to your hands and rub it all over your face, focusing on areas with heavy makeup. Rinse with water and wipe off your face with a dark cloth. Note You can use any carrier oil for this method. Certain oils work better for each skin type. Grapseeed or jojoba oil work great for once-prone skin, while sweet almond oil, sunflower oil, or olive oil work great for normal skin. Play around with the carrier oil to see which works best for you.

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Medicare and Medicaid will cover Acupunture for Chronic Low Back Pain

Dear U.S. Pain Foundation volunteers, We are pleased to share that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will cover acupuncture for chronic low back pain (CLBP). The news comes following a series of open comment periods offered by CMS on the topic. We alerted our volunteers to the second comment period earlier this summer, and many of you took the time to respond. The second open comment period saw an impressive 644 submitted comments, most of them patients. (You can read U.S. Pain Foundation’s submitted comments here.) Why this mattersAs an organization, we support public and private payer coverage of acupuncture for people living with all diseases, injuries, and conditions that cause chronic pain. This decision validates the advocacy work of many of us in the pain community, who have been urging CMS to cover more nonpharmacological therapies for chronic pain. While this one modality may not help everyone with chronic low back pain, it’s important that patients have the opportunity to try it. It’s also important because Medicare coverage standards help inform private insurance policy.  Who is eligibleCMS defines chronic low back pain as lasting 12 weeks or longer, and as being nonspecific, in that it has no identifiable systemic cause, is not associated with surgery, and is not associated with pregnancy. Under this new decision, up to 12 visits in 90 days are covered for Medicare beneficiaries who meet the criteria. An additional eight sessions will be […]

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Flowly: Relaxation Training and 30 Day Trial

Dear pain warriors,Increased stress, anxiety, and trouble sleeping are common for people living with chronic pain. Unfortunately, stress, anxiety, and poor sleep can make pain worse, and vice versa. It’s a vicious cycle.That’s why we are delighted to share a new tool for managing anxiety, stress, and sleep, and by association, managing pain: Flowly: Relaxation Training. Flowly is an iPhone app that combines biofeedback and virtual reality (VR) using either just your phone or a bluetooth sensor. From the comfort of your home, Flowly lets you see how your heart rate and breathing change as you engage in VR. By being able to see your heart rate and breathing, you can learn to make changes in your body to reduce anxiety, reduce pain, and in some cases, even increase sleep and focus. In case studies, Flowly helped reduce pain an average of 46 percent after each session. It is currently partnering with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on an upcoming clinical trial.One-month, risk-free trialFlowly understands how important it is to be able to try a therapy option before investing money in it. Here’s how their one-month, risk-free trial works: download the Flowly app and sign up for the monthly or annual subscription. Flowly will automatically send you a kit, including one VR headset and heart rate sensor (the cost of the kit is included in your subscription).If you wish to discontinue Flowly, just send back the kit before the end of the first month, and […]

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Can A Spine Stimulator Stop Chronic Pain?

After working with a Pain Management doctor for six months he’s determined I’m a good candidate for a Spine Stimulator. It works by leads placed in your mid-back attached to the implanted stimulation device, the stimulation disrupts the pain signals to the brain thus relieving the pain. I had my psychological evaluation yesterday and now waiting for insurance approval. My […]

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Looking For The Light is Texas Ambassador for U.S. Pain Foundation

U.S. Pain Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to improving the lives of people with chronic conditions that cause pain. HERE ARE SOME OF THE PROGRAMS WE OFFER: Awareness & Advocacy Programs INvisible Project Advocacy Program Pain Awareness Month Points For Pain Medical Cannabis Program Support & Empowerment Programs Pain Connection Pain Ambassador Network Pediatric Pain Warriors Share Your Story […]

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Dealing with the realities of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

A Publication of the American Counseling Association DOWNLOAD  By Bethany Bray Licensed professional counselor (LPC) Ruth Drew oversees the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24-hour helpline, which offers support to those facing the challenges of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, including families and caregivers. The fact that the helpline receives more than 300,000 calls each year hints at the heart-wrenching issues that accompany a dementia diagnosis, not just for the individual but for the person’s entire support system. “We receive a wide range of questions, from someone worried about the warning signs of cognitive decline or dealing with a new diagnosis, to an adult son whose mother didn’t recognize him for the first time, or a wife wondering how to get her husband with Alzheimer’s to take a bath. Whatever the reason for the call, we meet callers where they are and endeavor to provide the information, resources and emotional support they need,” says Drew, director of information and support services at the Chicago-based nonprofit. Professional counselors are a good fit to help not only individuals with dementia and Alzheimer’s, but also those in their care networks, Drew says. Whether counseling individuals, couples or even children, the far-reaching implications of dementia mean that practitioners of any specialization may hear clients talk about the stressors and overwhelming emotions that can accompany the diagnosis. “People diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and other dementia diseases are going through profound life changes — coping with the realities of an incurable disease […]

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Hope For Depression Research Foundation, Inspired by the Hope in all of us

I found out about this exciting group from a fragrance advertisement for Hope, Hope Sport, and Hope Night, all available at Bergdorf Goodman.com. All net profits support Hope For Depression Research Foundation. Learn more at HOPEFORDEPRESSION.ORG Please check out their site, it’s packed full of information and resources. Melinda Our Mission The mission of the Hope for Depression Research Foundation (HDRF) is to fund cutting-edge, scientific research into the origins, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of depression and its related mood and other emotional disorders – bipolar disorder, postpartum depression, post-traumatic stress syndrome, anxiety disorder and suicide. In 2010, HDRF launched its Depression Task Force (DTF) – an outstanding collaboration of seven leading scientists, at the frontiers of brain science, from different research institutions across the U.S. and Canada.  These scientists have developed an unprecedented research plan that integrates the most advanced knowledge in genetics, epigenetics, molecular biology, electrophysiology, and brain imaging. To accelerate breakthrough research, they share ongoing results, in real time, at a centralized data bank, the HDRF Data Center. HDRF was founded in April 2006 by Audrey Gruss in memory of her mother, Hope, who suffered from clinical depression. Every dollar raised goes directly to research. Founder’s Message My mother Hope suffered from depression for most of her late adult life. My sisters, father and I witnessed decades of misdiagnosis, trials of medication, troublesome side effects and the psychic pain and life-sapping loss of energy that is a mark […]

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When college students post about depression on Facebook

Jan 07,2020 Jeff Grabmeier Ohio State News grabmeier.1@osu.edu Study suggests friends don’t encourage them to seek help When college students post about feelings of depression on Facebook, their friends are unlikely to encourage them to seek help, a small study suggests. In fact, in this study, none of the 33 participating students said their friends told them they should reach out to a mental health professional to discuss their problems. Instead, most friends simply sent supportive or motivating messages.Scottye CashBut that may not be good enough for people who are truly depressed – as some of the people in this study probably were, said Scottye Cash, lead author of the study and professor of social work at The Ohio State University. “It makes me concerned that none of the Facebook friends of students in this study were proactive in helping their friend get help,” Cash said. “We need to figure out why.” The research, published online recently in the journal JMIR Research Protocols, is part of a larger online study of health outcomes of 287 students at four universities in the Midwest and West. This study included the 33 students in the larger study who reported that they had “reached out on Facebook for help when depressed.” The students reported what type of post they made and how their friends responded. They also completed a measure of depression. Results showed that nearly half of the participants reported symptoms consistent with moderate or severe […]

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Survivors Blog Here Welcomes Ann Bale from Don’t Lose Hope

Please join me in welcoming Ann Bale from Don’t Lose hope to Survivors Blog Here. We are excited to have her as a Contributor and look forward to a great 2020.  Ann has a Master’s Degree in Psychology, a Diploma in Clinical and Pastoral Counselling, and has completed a year of psychotherapy training. She has worked as a counsellor in private practice, and has taught in schools and colleges (both online and in classroom settings.) In addition to this, she has written accredited certificate, diploma and degree courses in counselling and psychology, in the UK and in North America. Ann has been working in education, counselling and psychology for over 30 years. Ann’s blog Don’t Lose Hope, http://sexaddictionpartners@wordpress.com supports, helps heal and educate partners of sexual addiction. We are committed to sharing knowledge and offering support to those whose lives have been affected by addiction, are dealing with a crisis, have experienced a trauma, are walking through a period of grief and loss, or who are working on relationship issues. You can reach Ann at ann@coachingskillsintl.com. Please stop by, welcome Ann and be sure to check out her website. Melinda 

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Easy To Make Soothing Bath Salts *Great For Chronic Pain and Holiday Gift*

Willow and Sage by Stampington Great for people who suffer from chronic pain. For an additional benefit add apple cider vinegar to water when running the bath. You Will Need 4 cups Epsom salt 1/2 cup sea salt (optional) 25-30 drops of essential oils 3/4 cup baking soda Large Bowl Airtight containers To Make Mix the Epsom salt, sea salt, essential oils, and baking soda in a large bowl. Transfer mixture to airtight containers, such as a small glass jar for gifting. You can use any desired scent in your bath salts, but first, make sure to research the type of scent of essential oil that you’ll be using to ensure it’s safe for the bath.

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Gluten-Free Salmon with Lime and Sesame Seeds Great for the Season

Gluten-Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD with Susie Flaherty   Ingredients: 1 1/2 to 2 pounds salmon (wild-caught preferred with skin on) Juice from 2-3 limes Olive Oil Sesame Seeds Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and coat very lightly with olive oil. Place salmon, skin side down, on parchment paper in the pan. Squees the juice of 2-3 limes into a bowl. Use a pastry brush to coat salmon with lime juice. Coat the top of the salmon with sesame seeds. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. Be careful to not overcook.  

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Easy To Make Calming Oil-Great Holiday Gift

Willow and Sage by Stampington This combination smells lovely and helps to soothe anxious feelings. You can keep one in your purse to have on hand throughout the day. YOU WILL NEED Carrier oil: fractionated coconut oil/grapeseed oil/jojoba oil Glass roller bottle 10-ml. 6 drops lavender essential oil 6 drops orange essential oil 6 drops patchouli essential oil 4 drops frankincense essential oil TO MAKE Add the carrier oil to the glass roller bottle. Add essential oils to the bottle, and shake to combine.

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Lena Dunham opens up about drug addiction: ‘Pills I thought dulled my pain actually created it’

‘When I was dropped off at rehab, I thought it was the end of my life,’ says Dunham Clémence MichallonNew York @Clemence_Mcl Monday 28 October 2019 16:42  Lena Dunham attends the Friendly House 30th annual awards luncheon on 26 October, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. ( Vince Bucci/Getty Images for Friendly House ) Lena Dunham has opened up about her prescription drugs addiction and her newfound sobriety. The actor was named Woman of the Year by Friendly House, an addiction treatment facility for women in Los Angeles. “I didn’t think that I was a drug addict,” Dunham, who has previously said she used to misuse prescription medication, said while accepting the honour at a luncheon this weekend, according to Variety. Speaking in more detail about her former struggle around drugs, she added that “pills that I thought dulled my pain actually created it”. Dunham, who has been sober for 18 months, first disclosed her history of drug abuse last year in a podcast with Dax Shepard.     At that time, she told the actor she had “misused [benzodiazepines]” for three years, adding: “Nobody I know who are prescribed these medications is told, ‘By the way, when you try and get off this, it’s going to be like the most hellacious acid trip you’ve ever had where you’re f****** clutching the walls and the hair is blowing off your head and you can’t believe you found yourself in this situation.” During this weekend’s event, Dunham explained how media portrayals had skewed her […]

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Easy To Make Soothing Bath Salts *Great For Chronic Pain and Holiday Gift*

Willow and Sage by Stampington Great for people who suffer from chronic pain. For an additional benefit add apple cider vinegar to water when running the bath. You Will Need 4 cups Epsom salt 1/2 cup sea salt (optional) 25-30 drops of essential oils 3/4 cup baking soda Large Bowl Airtight containers To Make Mix the Epsom salt, sea salt, essential oils, and baking soda in a large bowl. Transfer mixture to airtight containers, such as a small glass jar for gifting. You can use any desired scent in your bath salts, but first, make sure to research the type of scent of essential oil that you’ll be using to ensure it’s safe for the bath.

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Great Gluten-Free Dessert For Of All Ages

From Helen Allan Christchurch, New Zealand For your next birthday party, make a “pavlova” – a delicious meringue shell filled with whipped cream and topped with fresh fruit. With it’s sweet, fluffy interior and crunchy crust, meringue is a favorite for kids of all ages. The desert, which is claimed by both New Zealand and Australia, was created for the great imperial Russian ballerina, Anna Palova, during her tour in the 1920’s. INGREDIENTS: 4 egg whites 1 cup fine granulated sugar (castor sugar) 1 teaspoon white vinegar 2 teaspoons cornstarch 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup heavy cream 1 tablespoon whipping cream 1 tablespoon powdered sugar (if desired) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Strawberries and kiwi fruit Preheat oven 250 degrees. Beat eggs whites on high speed until they look like ribbons when dropped from the beater. Add sugar, one tablespoon at a time, beating after each addition. Beat meringue mixture until it forms stiffs peaks but isn’t dry. Fold vinegar, cornstarch, and vanilla into mixture. Using parchment paper on a cookie sheet, spoon the meringue mixture into a circle on the sheet about six to eight inches in diameter ( a rubber spatula really helps with this step.) Bake 1 1/2 hours. Turn oven off and open the door, leaving the meringue to cool. The meringue shell will fall as it cools but that is okay.- that’s when whipped cream is for. When the meringue shell is cool, whip the […]

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Congress has a bill to expand medical marijuana and CBD research

Dear U.S. Pain Foundation advocates,  We wanted to let you know about an opportunity to take action on a federal bill that would expand and coordinate scientific research of cannabidiol (CBD) or marijuana-derived products, allowing researchers to better understand their potential efficacy and safety. While medical cannabis is increasingly available in a number of states nationwide, too often, there is little clinical data available to help patients and health care providers make informed decisions about whether it would work well for their specific condition, or how much and what type to use.    Introduced by Senators Dianne Feinstein, Chuck Grassley, and Brian Schatz, The Cannabidiol and Marihuana Research Expansion Act (S. 2032) would streamline the research process, eliminating the lengthy delays and roadblocks researchers face when trying to study medical marijuana and CBD-derived products.  Why U.S. Pain supports S. 2032We believe people with chronic illness and pain should have access to all safe, effective treatments, including medical cannabis. Research is critical as it would lead to increased understanding about cannabis as a therapeutic option (including efficacy, safety, proper dosing, best delivery methods, etc.) and may lead to new, FDA-approved treatment options for people with pain.  Now is the time to take action U.S. Pain has created two online campaigns for advocates on this issue because we’d like to accomplish two goals:  1. Have the Senate Committee on the Judiciary schedule a hearing on the bill2. Gain additional cosponsors of the bill Click here and see if your Senator sits on […]

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Celebrating 17th Wedding Anniversary

It’s hard to believe it’s been seventeen years, so many have been spent caring for loved ones or being sick. I’ve lost so many years, no they weren’t technically lost, I was present during the first three years of our marriage, we had fun cooking together, enjoying a late-night swim and grocery shopping together. When your vows say for better or worse you don’t think the worst will come so soon. You also don’t realize those years aren’t the worst, they get worse. I was caring for my ill and dying grandparents over an eight-year period during the last years of their life. I stayed for weeks at a time. Absent, absent from my husband, our life and myself. It’s not a pity party today, it’s a real reflection of how marriage can be so different than you plan. The year my gramps died I started getting sick and a year-long journey with a neurologist started. Every test was abnormal but she could not make a diagnosis. Luckily, I learned Internet search skills from my previous job and could start my research. I narrowed my guesses to eight autoimmune diseases and took a wild guess at Lyme. This is one of those times I wish I were wrong. Lyme and the illnesses it brings along have been in the driver seat since 2012. This post isn’t about me, it’s about my husband. I’ve been absent, mentally unavailable, sick and dying […]

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New way to think about brain’s link to postpartum depression

Science News Research in animals shows brain’s immune system is activated by stress during pregnancy October 21, 2019 Source: Ohio State University Chronic stress during pregnancy triggers an immune response in the brain that has potential to alter brain functions in ways that could contribute to postpartum depression, new research in animals suggests. The study is the first to show evidence of this gestational stress response in the brain, which is unexpected because the immune system in both the body and the brain is suppressed during a normal pregnancy. The Ohio State University researchers who made the discovery have been studying the brain biology behind postpartum depression for several years, creating depressive symptoms in pregnant rats by exposing them to chronic stress. Chronic stress during pregnancy is a common predictor of postpartum depression, which is characterized by extreme sadness, anxiety and exhaustion that can interfere with a mother’s ability to care for herself or her baby. Stress is known to lead to inflammation, which prompts an immune response to protect against inflammation’s harmful effects. Based on what they already know about compromised brain signaling in rats stressed during pregnancy, the scientists suspect the immune cells in the brain responding to stress may be involved. If that’s the case, the immune changes may create circumstances in the brain that increase susceptibility to depression. In unstressed pregnant rats, the normal suppression of the immune system in the body and the brain remained […]

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How should the FDA evaluate new medications for pain?

Dear U.S. Pain volunteer advocates,   We wanted to make you aware of an opportunity to submit public comments to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Specifically, the FDA would like the public’s views on two main issues: 1. What criteria the FDA should use to evaluate new opioids to treat pain2. What new incentives are needed to better support and encourage the development of new treatments for painOn Sept. 17 the FDA held a public hearing called “Standards for Future Opioid Analgesic Approvals and Incentives for New Therapeutics to Treat Pain and Addiction.” While the public hearing has passed, the FDA is accepting written comments until Nov. 18.  How to submitWritten comments are to be submitted to the Division of Docket’s Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. Electronic comments can be submitted by using the button below.All comments must be identified with the docket number FDA-2019-N-2514. Please keep in mind that all comments submitted to the docket are public.Why advocates should engageWe think it is important for people with pain to let FDA know your thoughts on these issues. A number of people and organizations at the hearing said that they thought no new opioids should be allowed on the market. What’s your opinion about this?People with pain need new optionsThere has long been a lack of new non-opioid medications approved for pain. We encourage you to tell FDA what impact pain has had on your life and how speeding up the development of new […]

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Ketamine and Future Depression Treatments

October 16, 2019 Psychiatry Advisor Contributing Writer Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Reddit Print Share by Email Researchers are hailing ketamine as the most significant new development in psychiatry given its high efficacy for treating major depression. Recent evidence has shown that in addition to depression, ketamine may also be a promising treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a number of other treatment-refractory neuropsychiatric disorders. In a recent paper published in Drug Discovery Today, researchers explore ketamine’s role in revolutionizing new mental health treatments and discuss how this drug’s mechanism of action has led to an influx of new research and studies on depression treatment. Ketamine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1970 as an anesthetic and safe alternative to phencyclidine. The therapeutic benefits of ketamine as an antidepressant were explored years later because of a stigma on from its widespread recreational use during the late 1960s and 1970s, and this agent was initially only administered intravenously. In 2000, researchers found that ketamine had strong, fast-acting, and long-term effects in depression. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design study, patients with depression received 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine or saline on the first day of testing. Treatments were switched 1 week later. Researchers found that the antidepressant effects of ketamine began within 4 hours, peaked at 72 hours, and lasted for 1 to 2 weeks thereafter.1 In a 2006 study, this finding was […]

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Bring Change To Mind November Newsletter

BC2M 4th Annual SF Student Summit 300 BC2M High School club members gathered in San Francisco on November 2nd to mark our 4th Annual Student Summit. Thanks to our amazing host, Pinterest, these teens spent an afternoon engaging in mental health conversations, participating in exciting activities, and meeting other students from around the Bay Area. We are so grateful for our keynote speaker, Jen Gotch, CCO and founder of ban.do, in sharing her personal story and path to successfully managing her mental illness. She spent hours engaging in Q&A following her time on stage!After a morning filled with various speakers and an exciting activity fair, our students dispersed into breakout sessions where they chose workshop tracks covering the following topics: Advocacy in High School and Beyond; Mental Health & Interpersonal Relationships; Mental Health in the 21st Century; and Identity and Mental Health. The track system was a hit and our students gave us amazing feedback on this new change we implemented. The BC2M Summit is one of the biggest highlights of the year for the students and allows them to learn from one another, build a movement of change in their community, deepen their understanding of mental health topics, and make life-long friends. With the inspiration and hope that filled the room, we know that these students will put an end to stigma and create a more empathetic and compassionate world.  Special thanks to our sponsors for making the event possible: […]

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Easy To Make Peppermint Sugar Scrub-Perfect Holiday Gift

Willow and Sage by Stampington YOU WILL NEED Yields 1 cup 1/2 cup coconut oil Glass bowl 1 cup granulated sugar 12-15 drops peppermint essential oil Glass jars Candy cane, finely crushed TO MAKE Melt the coconut oil in a glass bowl in the microwave for about 30 seconds, and let cool for five minutes. Stir in the sugar and essential oils until combined. Package the peppermint sugar scrub in airtight glass jars, and sprinkle finely crushed candy cane on top; mix the candy cane into the scrub if desired. To use, gently massage a small amount into clean, dry skin. Rinse thoroughly with lukewarm water, and pat dry. Store the sugar scrub in a cool dry place for up to six months. Buy jars with hinged lids for a spa look and attach a ribbon and small spoon. 

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Easy To Make Spiced Citrus Room Spray-Great Holiday Gift

Willow and Sage by Stampington Spiced Citrus Room Spray YOU WILL NEED 2 oz. witch hazel Glass spray bottle: 4 oz 14 drops orange essential oil 6 drops cinnamon essential oil 6 drops clove essential oil 4 drops ginger essential oil 2 oz. filter water TO MAKE Add the witch hazel to the spray bottle. Add the essential oils. Top it with the filtered water. Shake before each use. You can tie a ribbon around, this would make a perfect inexpensive holiday gift.

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Channeling HYGEE in Wintery Days

Willow and Sage by Stampington The Danish concept of hygee never gets old. It’s all about slowing down and taking your time, creating space for warmth, coziness, and being in the moment. Although it’s not specific to wintertime, hygee lends itself well to the season. Here are a few ideas on how to infuse hygee into your cozy living this winter. Snuggle up with blankets and pillows Use soft lighting and candlelight Decorate with natural items Wear thick soaks and wooly sweaters Drink warm apple cider or hot cocoa Pay attention to textures Declutter your home Make soup from scratch Reread a favorite book Handwrite letters to friends or family Eat dinner by candlelight Practice embroidery  

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Why Joker’s depiction of mental illness is dangerously misinformed

Annabel Driscoll and Mina Husain The Guardian Mon 21 Oct 2019 11.04 EDT With films playing a key role in shaping attitudes to mental health, two doctors say Joaquin Phoenix’s troubled supervillain perpetuates damaging stereotypes As junior doctors who work on acute inpatient psychiatric wards, serious mental illness is our daily reality. We have, therefore, watched the controversies around Todd Phillips’s Joker – in which Joaquin Phoenix plays a troubled loner who turns to violence – with professional interest. The film’s dominance in the debate about portrayals of mental illness in the movies comes at a curious time. Recently, we’ve witnessed great leaps of awareness about relatively common mental-health issues such as depression and anxiety, and with that awareness, increasing dismissal of the sort of unhelpful prejudices that used to surround them. These are now readily discussed without shame and often represented in the media with a well-informed grasp of the facts, thanks to effective information campaigns. Joker review – the most disappointing film of the year 2 out of 5 stars.     Read more However, severe mental health conditions, such as psychotic illnesses, remain shrouded in stigma and are consistently misrepresented and misunderstood. Portrayals of mental illness in film can perpetuate unfounded stereotypes and spread misinformation. One of the more toxic ideas that Joker subscribes to is the hackneyed association between serious mental illness and extreme violence. The notion that mental deterioration necessarily leads to violence against others – implied by the juxtaposition of Phoenix’s character Arthur stopping […]

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Treating Lyme with Marty Ross MD-Probiotics

Dear Subscriber, Most people with Lyme disease should take probiotics while they are in treatment. However, not all probiotics are created equal. And there are different types of probiotics for different situations. In Probiotics in Lyme Treatment I explain the different kinds of probiotics. Preventing yeast requires a different probiotic strategy than treating active yeast infection. Some on antibiotics may also develop an intestinal infection problem called C. Difficile. In Probiotics in Lyme Treatment I show you which probiotic products to use for each of these situations and describe how to dose them. In Health, Marty Ross MD  Read Now Spread the Word!   ShareTweetForward Quality Matters. See the various probiotic products I use successfully in my practice at Marty Ross MD Healing Arts.  Look Now

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U.S. PAIN FOUNDATION SUBMITS COMMENTS TO CMS RFI

October 16, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation/ 0 Comments October 11, 2019 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Comments on the Request for Information (RFI) on the Development of a CMS Action Plan to Prevent Opioid Addiction and Enhance Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment The U.S. Pain Foundation is pleased to respond to CMS’s request for information to inform the development of a CMS Action plan to prevent opioid addiction and improve the treatment of acute and chronic pain. The U.S. Pain Foundation is the largest 501 (c) (3) organization for people who live with chronic pain from a myriad of diseases, conditions and serious injuries. Our mission is to connect, support, educate and advocate for those living with chronic pain, as well as their caregivers and healthcare providers. Chronic pain is an enormous public health problem. The CDC and NIH have reported that 50 million Americans live with chronic pain and 19.6 million live with high-impact chronic pain that interferes with their ability to 1 There are currently very few highly effective treatments for many pain conditions. Managing pain is a matter of finding the right combination of treatments that allows pain sufferers to function and have some quality of life. We believe people with chronic pain should have access to a wide range of therapies and treatments because pain is very individual – what helps one person living with pain will not necessarily help another.Most people living with chronic pain spend […]

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INTERIM CEO A KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT AMERICAN MASSAGE THERAPY ASSOCIATION CONVENTION

October 31, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation/ 0 Comments Interim CEO Nicole Hemmenway was one of three keynote speakers at the closing session of the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) national convention last weekend in Indianapolis, IN. In her talk, “Massage for Chronic Pain: What our community wants you to know,” Hemmenway shared her personal journey with complex regional pain syndrome and why she’s dedicated herself to helping others with pain through the U.S. Pain Foundation. She gave attendees a glimpse into the programs and services U.S. Pain offers, and provided insight into the scope of the chronic pain health crisis in America. The emphasis of Hemmenway’s remarks was on the barriers to multidisciplinary care, particularly massage, and how massage therapists can best help people with pain. “It truly was a privilege to be invited by the AMTA to speak at their annual convention,” Hemmenway says. “There is a greater need, maybe now more than ever, for affordable access to multidisciplinary care, such as massage therapy. I was so impressed with the therapists I spoke to who are genuinely invested in patient’s overall wellness. But like the pain community, they also feel discouraged by the lack of access. That is why it is so important for us to use our voices to fight for better coverage of options like massage.” Hemmenway shared feedback from the pain community about what they wanted massage therapists to know, including: People with pain have bodies that are […]

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How To Care For Yourself When Dealing With Difficult People

By Dana BelletiereLast updated: 3 Oct 2019~ One of my friends tells her story of growing up with a mother with “issues” rather matter-of-factly, but the details are pretty grim to listen to. “She would stop talking to me for no reason, for days at a time, and put a gift on my bed when she decided she was done being mad at me. We never talked about why she was angry, and most of the time I didn’t know. I just knew not to talk to her until she left something on my bed, and then I’d hold my breath until the next time she got upset about something.”  My friend’s mother sometimes disappeared for lengths of time without anyone knowing where she went or when (or if) she would return. When she fought with my friend’s father, she frequently brought my friend into the arguments as a mediator, despite her being a child. “Everything was about her,” my friend says. “Even as an adult, forty years later, everything is still about her.” Whether we are born into families with difficult people, or enter into relationships with them as friends, coworkers, partners, etcetera, it can be challenge to know how to best respond to someone who is emotionally unwell. In order to do so effectively, it is paramount that we understand that the behaviors that are being presented are not our fault, develop firm and clear boundaries about what we will and will […]

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Gluten-Free Salmon with Lime and Sesame Seeds Great for Holidays

Gluten-Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD with Susie Flaherty   Ingredients: 1 1/2 to 2 pounds salmon (wild-caught preferred with skin on) Juice from 2-3 limes Olive Oil Sesame Seeds Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and coat very lightly with olive oil. Place salmon, skin side down, on parchment paper in the pan. Squees the juice of 2-3 limes into a bowl. Use a pastry brush to coat salmon with lime juice. Coat the top of the salmon with sesame seeds. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. Be careful to not overcook.  

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#Art Through Pain #KNOWvember

Dear pain warriors,Each November, U.S. Pain Foundation organizes a month-long educational campaign for the pain community. Recognizing that art and writing can help kids and adults cope with and/or express chronic pain and its effects on their lives, this year’s KNOWvember campaign will focus on creativity.During the month, titled “Art through Pain: How Creativity Helps Us Cope,” U.S. Pain will be:hosting three virtual events, soliciting visual art submissions to showcase at a later date,and highlighting information about art and pain on social media (#ArtThroughPain).If you’d like to submit your artwork, you have the option of sharing it with us privately or allowing us to use it in a future project (such as in a blog post on Remedy or an INvisible Project magazine) through the link below. Submit your artwork >>

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The Flower of Purpose —Guest Blogger Shedding Light on Mental Health

Five years ago I began a friendship with my friend H.Dale who was incarcerated because of a psychotic episode. We began exchanging letters. Since that time I have come to know him as a brilliant young man who like many of us got blind sided by a serious mental illness. Unless you’re the one who […] The Flower of Purpose — Shedding Light on Mental Health

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Agoraphobia, Dreams, Trauma and EMDR

In post https://lookingforthelight.blog/2019/07/22/agoraphobia-is-not-logical/ ,‎ I forgot to mention the nightmares that have haunted me and I believe reinforce my agoraphobia. Every dream is based on not being able to get out or leave where I am. Examples, can’t find keys, don’t know what exit to take from store, cars covered in snow, not sure which one is mine. I also dream I’m flying, which I have for a long time, new to my dreams are not being able to see or only seeing a small amount. I’m not real deep into dream interpretation but from what I’ve read the deffinitions could fit. Flying is generally a good sign however it could mean you are fleeing something. Being blind is not wanting to see or face what is before you. I can’t help but think these dreams are aggrevating my agroraphobia and anxiety. Saturday I woke up and during the dream I could not find my car because it was snowed under, then I was flying in a part of town that is an hour away from where I live yet I was trying to get home. Next in the dream I’m in an expensive business suit and enter an auditorium, I’m nervious someone will think I have money and try to rob me so I’m shoving my purse into my breifcase. Then I find and pay phone and fumble for change and someone is standing in my way and won’t move […]

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Gluten-Free Capri Salad *Great for Holiday Gatherings

Ingredients: 2 large tomatoes Fresh basil 1/2 pound Mozzarella di Bufala di Campania (soft mozzarella cheese) 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil Using a bread knife, slice tomatoes thickly in 1/2 inch slices. Select soft mozzarella cheese packaged in water so it remains moist and flavorful (don’t use hard packed mozzarella used for pizza topping.) Carefully slice the mozzarella cheese […]

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Here’s the truth about CBD, from a cannabis researcher

IDEAS.TED.COM Sep 23, 2019 / Jeffrey Chen, MD Is CBD a cure-all — or snake oil? Jeffrey Chen, executive director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, explains the science behind the cannabis product. CBD gummies. CBD shots in your latte. CBD dog biscuits. From spas to drug stores, supermarkets to cafes, wherever you go in the US today, you’re likely to see products infused with CBD. There are cosmetics, vape pens, pills and, of course, the extract itself; there are even CBD-containing sexual lubricants for women which aim to reduce pelvic pain or enhance sensation. CBD has been hailed by some users as having cured their pain, anxiety, insomnia, depression or seizures, and it’s been touted by advertisers as a supplement that can treat all of the above and combat aging and chronic disease. As Executive Director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, I’m dedicated to unearthing the scientific truth — the good and the bad — behind cannabis and CBD. My interest was sparked in 2014 when I was a medical student at UCLA, and I discovered a parent successfully treating her child’s severe epilepsy with CBD. I was surprised and intrigued. Despite California legalizing medical cannabis in 1996, we weren’t taught anything about cannabis or CBD in med school. I did research and found other families and children like Charlotte Figi reporting success with CBD, and I knew it was something that needed to be investigated. I established Cannabis Research Initiative in the fall of 2017, and today we […]

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Why PTSD Is a Mental Injury, Not a Mental Illness

Psychology Today Posted Sep 23, 2019 Tracy S. Hutchinson, Ph.D. New research suggests that PTSD is a normal response to common life events.   According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 7.7 million adults suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Along with a surge of awareness regarding PTSD, there are also many misconceptions. For example, some believe it is only associated with war veterans, events such as 9/11, or natural disasters. Although this diagnosis has historically been associated with military veterans who undergo multiple deployments, there are many other events that can trigger symptoms of PTSD. For example, prolonged exposure to emotional and psychological abuse (e.g., verbally abusive relationships, alcoholism, or stressful childhoods) are risk factors for developing symptoms. Some of these lingering misconceptions may be due to the fact that development and recognition of the disorder is relatively recent and has really only blossomed in the last three decades. History In 1980, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) formally recognized PTSD as an actual mental health diagnosis. Historically, it had been formally recognized as “shell shock” and was thought only to occur in military war veterans. Further, PTSD had historically been thought of as something that someone “gets over” over time. This may be true for some, but it isn’t for others. Researchers continue to discover risk factors that can cause PTSD symptoms. This includes emerging research on the study of what happens in childhood and how it affects adults in their lifetime (van Der Kolk, 2014). For example, some of my clients […]

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You Left Your Job Because of Sexual Harassment. What Now?

OCT 04, 2019 Some victims of workplace sexual harassment are reluctant to report what happened because they fear the effect on their career. For those who leave their job after experiencing harassment or assault, it can be hard to know how to approach a new job search, application, or interview process. “It’s a challenging issue. It’s a difficult scenario that more and more people are being placed in. The main thing is to remember you’re not to blame and this situation doesn’t define you,” says Pete Church, a member of RAINN’s National Leadership Council and Chief Human Resources Officer at Avangrid, a leading sustainable energy company that operates in 24 states. What to do during your search  “If your goal is to assess how a potential employer understands and addresses harassment in the work environment, then there’s a lot of helpful research you can do before you’re in an interview,” Church suggests. He also recommends going on Glassdoor and reading reviews of the company. Even if you don’t see specific mentions of sexual harassment in the reviews, you can learn about the company culture. It can also be helpful to find past employees of a company you’re interested in on LinkedIn. You can reach out for a networking phone call to ask about what their experience was like, about the company culture, and if you feel comfortable doing so, why they left the organization. Approach the situation optimistically and know […]

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Citrus Salt Scrub

Willow and Sage by Stampington By Sarah Hauser You will need: YIELDS 12 oz. 1 cup fine sea salt 1/2 cup grapeseed oil Bowl 15-20 drops citrus essential oils Jar To Make: Mix together the sea salt and the grapeseed oil in a bowl or jar. Add essential oils, and mix well. Transfer to a jar for storing or gifting. […]

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The bias of mental illness — Guest Blogger Shedding Light on Mental Health

When I ask a group of participants to think of all the words associated with someone who has mental illness here’s what I get: crazy, looney, nuts, attention seeking, dangerous, violent, etc. Then I ask the question what are words you hear about a cancer survivor. Those words are: hero, warrior, brave, strong, etc. Then […] The bias of mental illness — Shedding Light on Mental Health

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Keep Speaking Out About Pain

Keep speaking out.My personal path into patient advocacy began with speaking at conferences about my struggle with complex regional pain syndrome, and, then, writing a book about it. But I know first-hand that speaking up isn’t easy–it can leave you feeling vulnerable and exposed, and it requires your already-limited energy and time. That’s why I’m so grateful to each pain warrior […]

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Lyme Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond

 Dear Subscriber, There are a number of things that can block your recovery from Lyme disease. If you have been on antibiotics for six to nine months and you are not getting better, there are additional steps to take. In Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond I describe how to move your treatment forward. In my Seattle practice, I discovered ways to move the treatments forward of my patients. In Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond I describe my formula. Read and watch this article to see if effective treatments are right for you. In Health, Marty Ross MD Read or Watch NowSpread the Word!  ShareTweetForwardQuality Matters. You can find the various supplements I use effectively in my Seattle practice at Marty Ross MD Supplements. Look Now

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Lyme Disease Journal #Five *Scoreboard Lyme-One, Me-Still Standing*

This is a repost from 2014 discussing a Gluten-Free diet. The information is an overview and may help if you’ve been told to start your Gluten-Free journey.  I hope this answers some of your questions and starts you on your way to less inflammation in your life.  Have a great day and always thank you for reading, I appreciate you. I love reading your comments so keep them coming. Melinda  This week I want to give a brief overview on Gluten Free Diet and Epstein Barr Virus. Both where the top searches in last weeks post. I hope the information is helpful. The CDC is a great place to get up to date information. Have a great weekend. 🙂   M Gluten Free What does it mean? My doctor follows The Mayo Clinic, Gluten-free diet: What’s allowed, what’s not. All information taken from The Mayo Clinic outline. A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). Gluten causes inflammation in the small intestines. Switching to a gluten-free diet is a big change at first, it takes some getting used to. Many specialty grocery stores sell gluten-free foods. We shop at Whole Foods and have found a large selection of gluten-free products, including brownies. Here are some surprises I discovered. My husband eats many gluten-free products but not exclusively. The Mayo Clinic strongly warns […]

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What are Glutens and how to start a Gluten-Free Lifestyle

It’s important to understand what glutens are and where to look for in order to establish a gluten-free lifestyle. As more people are diagnosed gluten intolerant more pre-made products will become available making choices much easier. I plan to write a number of post on the Gluten-Free lifestyle in the coming months. Below is a short list of items and ingredients you can eat. The Information is taken from Gluten Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD. Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School.  Melinda Gluten is found in common foods such as breads, cereals, baked goods, and pasta. Because it’s used in processed foods as an additive or preservative, gluten is also found in a wide variety of foods and nonfood items from prescription medications to Play-Doh. If you are the food shopper in the family, you must learn to read labels very carefully to comply with gluten-free diet. Things you can eat on the Gluten-Free Diet Gluten-Free Grains, Flours, Seeds and Starches Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Cassava Corn Flaxseed Nut Flours Millet Montina Gluten-Free Oats Quinoa Rice Sago Sorghum Tapioca Teff Wild rice Safe Ingredients List  Vinegar except malt vinegar  Distilled alcohol Carmel color Citric acid Spices Monosodium glutamate Maltodextrin Mono- and diglycerides Artificial flavor and color Natural flavor and color 

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Remembering Mom Part 3 – How to Help Your Dementia Loved One — Guest Blogger Hindsight: My Journey

Realizing your parent or any loved one may have dementia is a tough one. I live with the regretful feeling that I should have recognized it sooner. At the time I was absorbed with my own life drama, but that’s no excuse. My hope is that what I learned as a daughter, observer and eventual […] Remembering Mom Part 3 – How to Help Your Dementia Loved One — Hindsight: My Journey

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Billie Eilish opens up about mental health: ‘I didn’t think that I would even make it’ to 17

Charles Trepany, USA TODAYPublished 10:22 a.m. ET Sept. 5, 2019 Billie Eilish is getting real on her mental health. The “Bury a Friend” songstress confessed in her cover story for Elle magazine that, despite early career success, she hasn’t always been happy.  “Two years ago, I felt like nothing mattered; every single thing was pointless,” she said in the article published Thursday. “Not just in my life, but everything in the whole world. I was fully clinically depressed. It’s insane to look back and not be anymore.” Eilish has been accused by trolls of faking her depression, which she admitted have been painful to read. “It hurt me to see that,” she said. “I was a 16-year-old girl who was really unstable. I’m in the happiest place of my life, and I didn’t think that I would even make it to this age.” More: Billie Eilish, 17, rips Nylon Germany for topless cover: I ‘did not consent in any way’ The 17-year-old said her mental health has since improved, calling happiness a “crazy” feeling. “I haven’t been happy for years,” she said. “I didn’t think I would be happy again. And here I am—I’ve gotten to a point where I’m finally okay. It’s not because I’m famous. It’s not because I have a little more money. It’s so many different things: growing up, people coming into your life, certain people leaving your life.” More: Believe the hype: Billie Eilish proves she’s a once-in-a-generation talent at NYC concert The singer added […]

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Reusable Dryer Sheets

Willow and Sage by Stampington You will need 2 1/2 cups water 2 1/2 cups white vinegar 3-4 TB. vegetable glycerin Jar with sealed lid: large wide mouth 12 drops orange essential oil 12 drops lemon essential oil 7 drops lavender essential oil 7 drops peppermint essential oil Cotton quilting squares/washcloths To Make Add water, white vinegar and vegetable glycerin […]

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Men’s Eating Disorders Often Not Recognized

WEBMD HEALTH NEWS By Jennifer Clopton Sept. 5, 2019 — Nevada mom Ashley says she became worried when her 10-year-old son, Jordon, started to restrict his snacks and excessively work out. But even as he lost weight, she and her husband didn’t realize the extent or true cause of the problem. Like all the parents quoted in this story, she asked that her last name not be used to protect her son’s privacy. Ashley wasn’t the only one who failed to identify what was happening. Her husband thought their son was having a growth spurt. A nutritionist called it “a phase.” The emergency room doctor she sought out when she didn’t know where else to turn attributed his weight loss to being active and involved in sports. The ER doctor also said they needed to follow up with a pediatric oncologist to make sure Jordan didn’t have cancer. “He basically told my son to add smoothies to his diet, and he jumped to cancer as a possibility,” Ashley says. Ashley had to wait 3 weeks before a pediatric oncologist could see her son. But thankfully, he knew exactly what was going on. “He pulled my husband and I aside and said, ‘Your son doesn’t have cancer. He has an eating disorder.’” “I look back at pictures now and think, how did we miss it? But we were around him all the time, and we saw him eating. We didn’t realize how much he was exercising though, and we […]

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Camila Cabello just shared the simple self-help technique she uses to overcome her anxiety

People Posted byChristobel Hastings Published16 days ago Camila Cabello is no stranger to speaking out about her mental healthstruggles, and in a bid to raise awareness of the effects of anxiety, the singer shared the self-help technique she turns to when she’s feeling overwhelmed by the chaos of everyday life. In an age when our perception of the world is so often viewed through a heavily filtered lens, it can be tough to keep a cultivate a positive self-image. But despite the heavily-filtered images and aspirational messages we consume on our social media feeds, more and more celebrities are taking steps to break through the illusion of perfection and present a more nuanced reality. One star leading the way when it comes to disrupting the narrative is Camila Cabello. The singer is no stranger to speaking out about her struggles with mental health, and in a candid note to her followers last month, she opened up about her experiences with anxiety, and the ways she’s learned to cope with being “incredibly nervous” and “socially anxious.” This time around the Señorita singer is continuing her mental health conversation by sharing the coping mechanism she turns to when she’s feeling overwhelmed: breathing exercises. Taking to Instagram, the singer posted a long note to her followers acknowledging that she has the power to influence positive change in people’s lives through her social media platform, even if in “small ways.” “To anyone on here who is struggling, which we all do […]

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Knowledge Is Power but Experience Tells the Real Story

  National Pain Report Posted on August 26, 2019 by Denise Hedley There is something about being chronically ill that makes us need to know everything there is to know about what is wrong with our bodies. This, of course, gets us in trouble on occasion when the doctors take our knowledge of medical terminology and turn it around as proof that we are faking it. I guess they didn’t get the memo. Chronic pain does not mean chronic stupidity. We actually care. We are actively participating in our own care teams. We have gained a frightening amount of medical knowledge over the years just trying to understand our conditions. We know our bodies better than most. We deal with more in a short period of time, say during a flare, than many people deal within their lifetime. That is in addition to what we deal with when we’re not in a flare. For us, the pain never really goes away. Our experience adds to the knowledge we have accumulated. It enables us to cope with what is going on. It enables us to forge ahead through the abyss of opioid lies and laws that do little more than minimize our very existence. Denise Hedley I think we need to stand up and loudly use that knowledge because it is backed by our experience. Those who have been responsible for the faux crisis have limited knowledge. They only know the scientific […]

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Let’s Talk About Pain

Dear pain warriors, At U.S. Pain Foundation, we deeply believe in the power of sharing patient stories. Talking about our experiences with pain helps us to educate others, to create change, and to offer hope. That’s why our theme for Pain Awareness Month 2019, which begins Sunday, is #LetsTalkAboutPain.I first got involved in patient advocacy by writing a book about my experiences with complex regional pain syndrome. It enabled me to process my personal journey, take control of my story, and help create awareness for those like me. I hope speaking up about pain this September can do the same for you. This year, we have dozens of opportunities for you to help bring pain to the forefront of public conversations, ranging from our daily storyathon to social media giveaways to weekly events.All of these activities are presented in collaboration with our generous sponsor, Thrive Tape, the creator of an innovative, far-infrared kinesiology tape for all types of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. (We encourage you to check them out! Use the code USPAIN for a discount.)How you can participateWe have something for everyone! Most activities are online, which means you can take part from the comfort of your home. Storyathon. Each day in September, U.S. Pain will be sharing a video story of a real person living with pain. These individuals–from all walks of life–bravely submitted their personal stories in August to help create awareness. To watch the videos, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Missed the video storyathon deadline? Share […]

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The Simple Guide to Value Triggers

Psychology Today   How to live by your highest ideals. Posted Aug 11, 2019 Steven C. Hayes Ph.D. Get Out of Your Mind Source: Pixabay/CC Being in touch with your values is essential to living a rich and meaningful life. By knowing what you care about most, you become inspired to live by your highest ideals, bringing out the best in yourself. In short, values help you find direction, meaning, and inspiration in life. Unfortunately, however, it’s more complicated than this. Because too often enough, we get sidetracked. Too often, the demands of the day pull our attention away from what really matters, to serve our immediate emotional needs. We then lose touch of our ideals, and revert back to old – often destructive – habits. If you wish to stop this from happening, break the cycle of bad habits, and bring forth the best of yourself, you have to reconnect with your values whenever you lose touch. And the easiest way to accomplish this, are value triggers. What Are Value Triggers? A value trigger is a physical reminder of your core values. By merely looking at it, you refocus back on what matters most, making you act more in line with your highest ideals. The trigger can be almost anything, as long as it makes you remember your values. Here are a few ideas: Card in Wallet. Write down a few core values on an index card, and put it in your […]

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My Lyme Data Chart Book

How many participants in the MyLymeData patient registry ever had a Lyme-related rash? (34%) How many initially presented with flu-like symptoms? (64%) How many were misdiagnosed with a psychiatric illness? (54%) These are some of the details you can learn in the MyLymeData 2019 Chart Book. This report is a compilation of our research results based on more than 2.5 […]

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23andMe Explores Dietary Habit and Health Outcomes

August 6, 2019 By 23andMe under 23andMe Research By Rafaela Bagur Quetglas, PhD You are what you eat, is the old adage, but what does your diet actually say about you?  23andMe has a unique opportunity to explore that question, as we investigate how dietary habits, along with genetics, demographics, lifestyle and other data can influence overall health outcomes. Looking at diet specifically, our scientists analyzed the data of more than 850,000 people who consented to participate in research and who shared details about their own eating habits.  Using machine learning techniques* we were able to see that dietary choices clustered into four distinct types of eaters, which were mainly characterized by two dietary behaviors. The first one represents the spectrum of foods’ nutrient content from high nutrient-dense foods (i.e. low caloric foods with high nutrient content like vegetables, leafy greens, fruit, beans or whole-grains) to low nutrient-dense foods (i.e. high caloric foods with low nutrient content like. processed foods, sweets, sodas, pastries, saturated fats or  fast food). The second main behavior differentiating diet groups is the meat intake, in particular, red and processed meat (e.g., sausages, hot dogs, ham, or cured bacon).   Dietary Types Using these two behaviors as axes, we can plot the four main diet groups:  On one end, we find people who eat high nutrient-dense (HND) foods like  vegetables, leafy greens and fruits and tend to avoid high caloric foods with low nutrient content like refined carbs, processed foods, saturated […]

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Natural Seasonal Allergy Relief

Willow & Sage by Stampington By Kaetlyn Kennedy   Nettle Leaf Tea Made from stinging nettle plants, organic nettle tea can help relieve seasonal allergy symptoms with it’s natural antihistamine. You reap all the benefits of antihistamine symptom relief without having to take conventional medicines. You can drink the daily as a preventative or as needed.   Spirulina & Other […]

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Bring Change to Mind Partners with Mental Health for US

 Bring Change to Mind is excited to announce that we have partnered with Mental Health for US, a nonpartisan educational initiative focused on elevating mental health and addiction in policy conversations by empowering grassroots advocates and improving candidate and policymaker health literacy. The initiative is powered by a coalition of stakeholder groups from around the country dedicated to uniting the American people to make systemic, long-term change with civic engagement tools and resources.  The movement launched at The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s 10th Annual Advocacy Forum by former U.S. Representative and co-chair of the Mental Health for US initiative Patrick J. Kennedy (D-R.I.). Former U.S. Senator Gordon H. Smith (R-OR), a long-time mental health advocate, will also serve as co-chair. “The suicide rate has skyrocketed over the past 20 years because mental health and substance use disorders often go undetected and undertreated,” said Sen. Smith. “Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in America. Now more than ever, we need our government leaders to stand up and champion systemic change. We have to make our voices heard.”  Join us in building this movement of change!   Learn More About Mental Health for Us 

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What is Endometriosis?

Originally posted on Dr. Lori Gore-Green:
Reproductive health must be taken very seriously, which is why women should understand what endometriosis is. It is often a painful disorder inside of the uterus and involves the fallopian tubes, ovaries, and tissue lining the pelvis. and can go undiagnosed for years. Unfortunately, it can lead to infertility. Defining Endometriosis Endometriosis is when tissue that makes up the uterine lining is present on other organs inside your body. It usually appears to happen within the pelvis and lower abdomen, but it can happen anywhere in the body. Although men can be affected by the disorder, it is extremely rare and most common in women.  The Symptoms Women can experience pain during intercourse, painful periods, lower abdomen pain, and infertility. Over time, unfortunately, pain can increase and become more intense. Some may also experience painful bowel movements and heavy menstruation. Other symptoms can range from bloating, nausea, constipation, fatigue, and diarrhea, especially during their periods. The more severe the pain usually indicates how severe the disorder is. Pain can be the most painful symptom, but some women do not experience any symptoms.  Due to these symptoms, endometriosis can be often misdiagnosed. It can often be diagnosed as a pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or ovarian cysts. Endometriosis also shares the same symptoms as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which can complicate the diagnosis. Causes Unfortunately, the exact causes of endometriosis are unknown, but there are possible…

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What are Glutens and how to start a Gluten-Free Lifestyle

It’s important to understand what glutens are and where to look for in order to establish a gluten-free lifestyle. As more people are diagnosed gluten intolerant more pre-made products will become available making choices much easier. I plan to write a number of post on the Gluten-Free lifestyle in the coming months. Below is a short list of items and ingredients you can eat. The Information is taken from Gluten Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD. Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School.  Melinda Gluten is found in common foods such as breads, cereals, baked goods, and pasta. Because it’s used in processed foods as an additive or preservative, gluten is also found in a wide variety of foods and nonfood items from prescription medications to Play-Doh. If you are the food shopper in the family, you must learn to read labels very carefully to comply with gluten-free diet. Things you can eat on the Gluten-Free Diet Gluten-Free Grains, Flours, Seeds and Starches Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Cassava Corn Flaxseed Nut Flours Millet Montina Gluten-Free Oats Quinoa Rice Sago Sorghum Tapioca Teff Wild rice Safe Ingredients List  Vinegar except malt vinegar  Distilled alcohol Carmel color Citric acid Spices Monosodium glutamate Maltodextrin Mono- and diglycerides Artificial flavor and color Natural flavor and color 

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Find Delight in Different Forms of Stillness

“Stillness” can sound sentimental but it’s what most of us long for. Psychology Today Posted Jul 29, 2019  Rick Hanson Ph.D. Your Wise Brain What is your sense of stillness? “Stillness or peace” may sound merely sentimental (“visualize whirled peas”). But deep down, it’s what most of us long for. Consider the proverb: The highest happiness is stillness. Not a stillness or […]

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Prevent unnecessary medical care — by asking your doctor these 4 questions first

TED TALKS Jul 22, 2019 / Daryl Chen Justin Tran By raising questions and taking on a more active role in decision making, patients can do their part to avoid needless medications, tests, treatments or procedures, says neurosurgeon Christer Mjåset. This post is part of TED’s “How to Be a Better Human” series, each of which contains a piece of helpful advice […]

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Mini Me Health Update

My Parathyroid surgery was July 8th and I’m healing nicely. The surgeon found quite a surprise, I had five Parathyroids instead of four. She said it was rare. I hope that translates to feeling all the better. She is getting my calcium levels adjusted and it was painful in the beginning with cramping legs and numb fingers. It’s not what […]

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How Grief Shows Up In Your Body

WEB MD By Stephanie Hairston July 11, 2019 — It’s surprising how physical grief can be. Your heart literally aches. A memory comes up that causes your stomach to clench or a chill to run down your spine. Some nights, your mind races, and your heart races along with it, your body so electrified with energy that you can barely sleep. Other nights, you’re so tired that you fall asleep right away. You wake up the next morning still feeling exhausted and spend most of the day in bed. Amy Davis, a 32-year-old from Bristol, TN, became sick with grief after losing Molly, a close 38-year-old family member, to cancer. “Early grief was intensely physical for me,” Davis says. “After the shock and adrenaline of the first weeks wore off, I went through a couple of months of extreme fatigue, with nausea, headaches, food aversion, mixed-up sleep cycles, dizziness, and sun sensitivity. It was extremely difficult to do anything. … If there’s one thing I want people to know about grief, it’s how awful it can make your body feel.” What causes these physical symptoms? A range of studies reveal the powerful effects grief can have on the body. Grief increases inflammation, which can worsen health problems you already have and cause new ones. It batters the immune system, leaving you depleted and vulnerable to infection. The heartbreak of grief can increase blood pressure and the risk of blood clots. Intense grief can alter the […]

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Agrophobia Is Not Logical

Whatever this obstacle is, it started 18 months ago, there wasn’t a moment I can pin this inability on. Inability is the right word, I’m not afraid to leave the house, I’ve driven a few times in the past year, I know how to drive and live in the same town. Yet I have my husband take me to all […]

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Natural Seasonal Allergy Relief

Willow & Sage by Stampington By Kaetlyn Kennedy   Nettle Leaf Tea Made from stinging nettle plants, organic nettle tea can help relieve seasonal allergy symptoms with it’s natural antihistamine. You reap all the benefits of antihistamine symptom relief without having to take conventional medicines. You can drink the daily as a preventative or as needed.   Spirulina & Other […]

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Mini Health Update

I have Thyroid & Parathyroid surgery tomorrow and will be out of pocket for a couple of weeks. Ok, it will be hard to stay completely away but considering moving my neck in any direction will hurt, I won’t spend much time on WordPress. Please don’t stop the comments, I’ll take all the encouragement I can get. There are tumors […]

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