Easy To Make Calming Oil-Great Holiday Gift

Willow and Sage by Stampington This combination smells lovely and helps to soothe anxious feelings. You can keep one in your purse to have on hand throughout the day. YOU WILL NEED Carrier oil: fractionated coconut oil/grapeseed oil/jojoba oil Glass roller bottle 10-ml. 6 drops lavender essential oil 6 drops orange essential oil 6 drops patchouli essential oil 4 drops frankincense essential oil TO MAKE Add the carrier oil to the glass roller bottle. Add essential oils to the bottle, and shake to combine.

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Lena Dunham opens up about drug addiction: 'Pills I thought dulled my pain actually created it'

‘When I was dropped off at rehab, I thought it was the end of my life,’ says Dunham Clémence MichallonNew York @Clemence_Mcl Monday 28 October 2019 16:42  Lena Dunham attends the Friendly House 30th annual awards luncheon on 26 October, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. ( Vince Bucci/Getty Images for Friendly House ) Lena Dunham has opened up about her prescription drugs addiction and her newfound sobriety. The actor was named Woman of the Year by Friendly House, an addiction treatment facility for women in Los Angeles. “I didn’t think that I was a drug addict,” Dunham, who has previously said she used to misuse prescription medication, said while accepting the honour at a luncheon this weekend, according to Variety. Speaking in more detail about her former struggle around drugs, she added that “pills that I thought dulled my pain actually created it”. Dunham, who has been sober for 18 months, first disclosed her history of drug abuse last year in a podcast with Dax Shepard.     At that time, she told the actor she had “misused [benzodiazepines]” for three years, adding: “Nobody I know who are prescribed these medications is told, ‘By the way, when you try and get off this, it’s going to be like the most hellacious acid trip you’ve ever had where you’re f****** clutching the walls and the hair is blowing off your head and you can’t believe you found yourself in this situation.” During this weekend’s event, Dunham explained how media portrayals had skewed her […]

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Easy To Make Soothing Bath Salts *Great For Chronic Pain and Holiday Gift*

Willow and Sage by Stampington Great for people who suffer from chronic pain. For an additional benefit add apple cider vinegar to water when running the bath. You Will Need 4 cups Epsom salt 1/2 cup sea salt (optional) 25-30 drops of essential oils 3/4 cup baking soda Large Bowl Airtight containers To Make Mix the Epsom salt, sea salt, essential oils, and baking soda in a large bowl. Transfer mixture to airtight containers, such as a small glass jar for gifting. You can use any desired scent in your bath salts, but first, make sure to research the type of scent of essential oil that you’ll be using to ensure it’s safe for the bath.

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Great Gluten-Free Dessert For Of All Ages

From Helen Allan Christchurch, New Zealand For your next birthday party, make a “pavlova” – a delicious meringue shell filled with whipped cream and topped with fresh fruit. With it’s sweet, fluffy interior and crunchy crust, meringue is a favorite for kids of all ages. The desert, which is claimed by both New Zealand and Australia, was created for the great imperial Russian ballerina, Anna Palova, during her tour in the 1920’s. INGREDIENTS: 4 egg whites 1 cup fine granulated sugar (castor sugar) 1 teaspoon white vinegar 2 teaspoons cornstarch 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup heavy cream 1 tablespoon whipping cream 1 tablespoon powdered sugar (if desired) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Strawberries and kiwi fruit Preheat oven 250 degrees. Beat eggs whites on high speed until they look like ribbons when dropped from the beater. Add sugar, one tablespoon at a time, beating after each addition. Beat meringue mixture until it forms stiffs peaks but isn’t dry. Fold vinegar, cornstarch, and vanilla into mixture. Using parchment paper on a cookie sheet, spoon the meringue mixture into a circle on the sheet about six to eight inches in diameter ( a rubber spatula really helps with this step.) Bake 1 1/2 hours. Turn oven off and open the door, leaving the meringue to cool. The meringue shell will fall as it cools but that is okay.- that’s when whipped cream is for. When the meringue shell is cool, whip the […]

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Congress has a bill to expand medical marijuana and CBD research

Dear U.S. Pain Foundation advocates,  We wanted to let you know about an opportunity to take action on a federal bill that would expand and coordinate scientific research of cannabidiol (CBD) or marijuana-derived products, allowing researchers to better understand their potential efficacy and safety. While medical cannabis is increasingly available in a number of states nationwide, too often, there is little clinical data available to help patients and health care providers make informed decisions about whether it would work well for their specific condition, or how much and what type to use.    Introduced by Senators Dianne Feinstein, Chuck Grassley, and Brian Schatz, The Cannabidiol and Marihuana Research Expansion Act (S. 2032) would streamline the research process, eliminating the lengthy delays and roadblocks researchers face when trying to study medical marijuana and CBD-derived products.  Why U.S. Pain supports S. 2032We believe people with chronic illness and pain should have access to all safe, effective treatments, including medical cannabis. Research is critical as it would lead to increased understanding about cannabis as a therapeutic option (including efficacy, safety, proper dosing, best delivery methods, etc.) and may lead to new, FDA-approved treatment options for people with pain.  Now is the time to take action U.S. Pain has created two online campaigns for advocates on this issue because we’d like to accomplish two goals:  1. Have the Senate Committee on the Judiciary schedule a hearing on the bill2. Gain additional cosponsors of the bill Click here and see if your Senator sits on […]

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Celebrating 17th Wedding Anniversary

It’s hard to believe it’s been seventeen years, so many have been spent caring for loved ones or being sick. I’ve lost so many years, no they weren’t technically lost, I was present during the first three years of our marriage, we had fun cooking together, enjoying a late-night swim and grocery shopping together. When your vows say for better or worse you don’t think the worst will come so soon. You also don’t realize those years aren’t the worst, they get worse. I was caring for my ill and dying grandparents over an eight-year period during the last years of their life. I stayed for weeks at a time. Absent, absent from my husband, our life and myself. It’s not a pity party today, it’s a real reflection of how marriage can be so different than you plan. The year my gramps died I started getting sick and a year-long journey with a neurologist started. Every test was abnormal but she could not make a diagnosis. Luckily, I learned Internet search skills from my previous job and could start my research. I narrowed my guesses to eight autoimmune diseases and took a wild guess at Lyme. This is one of those times I wish I were wrong. Lyme and the illnesses it brings along have been in the driver seat since 2012. This post isn’t about me, it’s about my husband. I’ve been absent, mentally unavailable, sick and dying […]

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New way to think about brain’s link to postpartum depression

Science News Research in animals shows brain’s immune system is activated by stress during pregnancy October 21, 2019 Source: Ohio State University Chronic stress during pregnancy triggers an immune response in the brain that has potential to alter brain functions in ways that could contribute to postpartum depression, new research in animals suggests. The study is the first to show evidence of this gestational stress response in the brain, which is unexpected because the immune system in both the body and the brain is suppressed during a normal pregnancy. The Ohio State University researchers who made the discovery have been studying the brain biology behind postpartum depression for several years, creating depressive symptoms in pregnant rats by exposing them to chronic stress. Chronic stress during pregnancy is a common predictor of postpartum depression, which is characterized by extreme sadness, anxiety and exhaustion that can interfere with a mother’s ability to care for herself or her baby. Stress is known to lead to inflammation, which prompts an immune response to protect against inflammation’s harmful effects. Based on what they already know about compromised brain signaling in rats stressed during pregnancy, the scientists suspect the immune cells in the brain responding to stress may be involved. If that’s the case, the immune changes may create circumstances in the brain that increase susceptibility to depression. In unstressed pregnant rats, the normal suppression of the immune system in the body and the brain remained […]

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How should the FDA evaluate new medications for pain?

Dear U.S. Pain volunteer advocates,   We wanted to make you aware of an opportunity to submit public comments to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Specifically, the FDA would like the public’s views on two main issues: 1. What criteria the FDA should use to evaluate new opioids to treat pain2. What new incentives are needed to better support and encourage the development of new treatments for painOn Sept. 17 the FDA held a public hearing called “Standards for Future Opioid Analgesic Approvals and Incentives for New Therapeutics to Treat Pain and Addiction.” While the public hearing has passed, the FDA is accepting written comments until Nov. 18.  How to submitWritten comments are to be submitted to the Division of Docket’s Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. Electronic comments can be submitted by using the button below.All comments must be identified with the docket number FDA-2019-N-2514. Please keep in mind that all comments submitted to the docket are public.Why advocates should engageWe think it is important for people with pain to let FDA know your thoughts on these issues. A number of people and organizations at the hearing said that they thought no new opioids should be allowed on the market. What’s your opinion about this?People with pain need new optionsThere has long been a lack of new non-opioid medications approved for pain. We encourage you to tell FDA what impact pain has had on your life and how speeding up the development of new […]

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Ketamine and Future Depression Treatments

October 16, 2019 Psychiatry Advisor Contributing Writer Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Reddit Print Share by Email Researchers are hailing ketamine as the most significant new development in psychiatry given its high efficacy for treating major depression. Recent evidence has shown that in addition to depression, ketamine may also be a promising treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a number of other treatment-refractory neuropsychiatric disorders. In a recent paper published in Drug Discovery Today, researchers explore ketamine’s role in revolutionizing new mental health treatments and discuss how this drug’s mechanism of action has led to an influx of new research and studies on depression treatment. Ketamine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1970 as an anesthetic and safe alternative to phencyclidine. The therapeutic benefits of ketamine as an antidepressant were explored years later because of a stigma on from its widespread recreational use during the late 1960s and 1970s, and this agent was initially only administered intravenously. In 2000, researchers found that ketamine had strong, fast-acting, and long-term effects in depression. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design study, patients with depression received 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine or saline on the first day of testing. Treatments were switched 1 week later. Researchers found that the antidepressant effects of ketamine began within 4 hours, peaked at 72 hours, and lasted for 1 to 2 weeks thereafter.1 In a 2006 study, this finding was […]

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Bring Change To Mind November Newsletter

BC2M 4th Annual SF Student Summit 300 BC2M High School club members gathered in San Francisco on November 2nd to mark our 4th Annual Student Summit. Thanks to our amazing host, Pinterest, these teens spent an afternoon engaging in mental health conversations, participating in exciting activities, and meeting other students from around the Bay Area. We are so grateful for our keynote speaker, Jen Gotch, CCO and founder of ban.do, in sharing her personal story and path to successfully managing her mental illness. She spent hours engaging in Q&A following her time on stage!After a morning filled with various speakers and an exciting activity fair, our students dispersed into breakout sessions where they chose workshop tracks covering the following topics: Advocacy in High School and Beyond; Mental Health & Interpersonal Relationships; Mental Health in the 21st Century; and Identity and Mental Health. The track system was a hit and our students gave us amazing feedback on this new change we implemented. The BC2M Summit is one of the biggest highlights of the year for the students and allows them to learn from one another, build a movement of change in their community, deepen their understanding of mental health topics, and make life-long friends. With the inspiration and hope that filled the room, we know that these students will put an end to stigma and create a more empathetic and compassionate world.  Special thanks to our sponsors for making the event possible: […]

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Easy To Make Peppermint Sugar Scrub-Perfect Holiday Gift

Willow and Sage by Stampington YOU WILL NEED Yields 1 cup 1/2 cup coconut oil Glass bowl 1 cup granulated sugar 12-15 drops peppermint essential oil Glass jars Candy cane, finely crushed TO MAKE Melt the coconut oil in a glass bowl in the microwave for about 30 seconds, and let cool for five minutes. Stir in the sugar and essential oils until combined. Package the peppermint sugar scrub in airtight glass jars, and sprinkle finely crushed candy cane on top; mix the candy cane into the scrub if desired. To use, gently massage a small amount into clean, dry skin. Rinse thoroughly with lukewarm water, and pat dry. Store the sugar scrub in a cool dry place for up to six months. Buy jars with hinged lids for a spa look and attach a ribbon and small spoon. 

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Easy To Make Spiced Citrus Room Spray-Great Holiday Gift

Willow and Sage by Stampington Spiced Citrus Room Spray YOU WILL NEED 2 oz. witch hazel Glass spray bottle: 4 oz 14 drops orange essential oil 6 drops cinnamon essential oil 6 drops clove essential oil 4 drops ginger essential oil 2 oz. filter water TO MAKE Add the witch hazel to the spray bottle. Add the essential oils. Top it with the filtered water. Shake before each use. You can tie a ribbon around, this would make a perfect inexpensive holiday gift.

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Channeling HYGEE in Wintery Days

Willow and Sage by Stampington The Danish concept of hygee never gets old. It’s all about slowing down and taking your time, creating space for warmth, coziness, and being in the moment. Although it’s not specific to wintertime, hygee lends itself well to the season. Here are a few ideas on how to infuse hygee into your cozy living this winter. Snuggle up with blankets and pillows Use soft lighting and candlelight Decorate with natural items Wear thick soaks and wooly sweaters Drink warm apple cider or hot cocoa Pay attention to textures Declutter your home Make soup from scratch Reread a favorite book Handwrite letters to friends or family Eat dinner by candlelight Practice embroidery  

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Why Joker’s depiction of mental illness is dangerously misinformed

Annabel Driscoll and Mina Husain The Guardian Mon 21 Oct 2019 11.04 EDT With films playing a key role in shaping attitudes to mental health, two doctors say Joaquin Phoenix’s troubled supervillain perpetuates damaging stereotypes As junior doctors who work on acute inpatient psychiatric wards, serious mental illness is our daily reality. We have, therefore, watched the controversies around Todd Phillips’s Joker – in which Joaquin Phoenix plays a troubled loner who turns to violence – with professional interest. The film’s dominance in the debate about portrayals of mental illness in the movies comes at a curious time. Recently, we’ve witnessed great leaps of awareness about relatively common mental-health issues such as depression and anxiety, and with that awareness, increasing dismissal of the sort of unhelpful prejudices that used to surround them. These are now readily discussed without shame and often represented in the media with a well-informed grasp of the facts, thanks to effective information campaigns. Joker review – the most disappointing film of the year 2 out of 5 stars.     Read more However, severe mental health conditions, such as psychotic illnesses, remain shrouded in stigma and are consistently misrepresented and misunderstood. Portrayals of mental illness in film can perpetuate unfounded stereotypes and spread misinformation. One of the more toxic ideas that Joker subscribes to is the hackneyed association between serious mental illness and extreme violence. The notion that mental deterioration necessarily leads to violence against others – implied by the juxtaposition of Phoenix’s character Arthur stopping […]

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Treating Lyme with Marty Ross MD-Probiotics

Dear Subscriber, Most people with Lyme disease should take probiotics while they are in treatment. However, not all probiotics are created equal. And there are different types of probiotics for different situations. In Probiotics in Lyme Treatment I explain the different kinds of probiotics. Preventing yeast requires a different probiotic strategy than treating active yeast infection. Some on antibiotics may also develop an intestinal infection problem called C. Difficile. In Probiotics in Lyme Treatment I show you which probiotic products to use for each of these situations and describe how to dose them. In Health, Marty Ross MD  Read Now Spread the Word!   ShareTweetForward Quality Matters. See the various probiotic products I use successfully in my practice at Marty Ross MD Healing Arts.  Look Now

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U.S. PAIN FOUNDATION SUBMITS COMMENTS TO CMS RFI

October 16, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation/ 0 Comments October 11, 2019 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Comments on the Request for Information (RFI) on the Development of a CMS Action Plan to Prevent Opioid Addiction and Enhance Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment The U.S. Pain Foundation is pleased to respond to CMS’s request for information to inform the development of a CMS Action plan to prevent opioid addiction and improve the treatment of acute and chronic pain. The U.S. Pain Foundation is the largest 501 (c) (3) organization for people who live with chronic pain from a myriad of diseases, conditions and serious injuries. Our mission is to connect, support, educate and advocate for those living with chronic pain, as well as their caregivers and healthcare providers. Chronic pain is an enormous public health problem. The CDC and NIH have reported that 50 million Americans live with chronic pain and 19.6 million live with high-impact chronic pain that interferes with their ability to 1 There are currently very few highly effective treatments for many pain conditions. Managing pain is a matter of finding the right combination of treatments that allows pain sufferers to function and have some quality of life. We believe people with chronic pain should have access to a wide range of therapies and treatments because pain is very individual – what helps one person living with pain will not necessarily help another.Most people living with chronic pain spend […]

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INTERIM CEO A KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT AMERICAN MASSAGE THERAPY ASSOCIATION CONVENTION

October 31, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation/ 0 Comments Interim CEO Nicole Hemmenway was one of three keynote speakers at the closing session of the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) national convention last weekend in Indianapolis, IN. In her talk, “Massage for Chronic Pain: What our community wants you to know,” Hemmenway shared her personal journey with complex regional pain syndrome and why she’s dedicated herself to helping others with pain through the U.S. Pain Foundation. She gave attendees a glimpse into the programs and services U.S. Pain offers, and provided insight into the scope of the chronic pain health crisis in America. The emphasis of Hemmenway’s remarks was on the barriers to multidisciplinary care, particularly massage, and how massage therapists can best help people with pain. “It truly was a privilege to be invited by the AMTA to speak at their annual convention,” Hemmenway says. “There is a greater need, maybe now more than ever, for affordable access to multidisciplinary care, such as massage therapy. I was so impressed with the therapists I spoke to who are genuinely invested in patient’s overall wellness. But like the pain community, they also feel discouraged by the lack of access. That is why it is so important for us to use our voices to fight for better coverage of options like massage.” Hemmenway shared feedback from the pain community about what they wanted massage therapists to know, including: People with pain have bodies that are […]

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How To Care For Yourself When Dealing With Difficult People

By Dana BelletiereLast updated: 3 Oct 2019~ One of my friends tells her story of growing up with a mother with “issues” rather matter-of-factly, but the details are pretty grim to listen to. “She would stop talking to me for no reason, for days at a time, and put a gift on my bed when she decided she was done being mad at me. We never talked about why she was angry, and most of the time I didn’t know. I just knew not to talk to her until she left something on my bed, and then I’d hold my breath until the next time she got upset about something.”  My friend’s mother sometimes disappeared for lengths of time without anyone knowing where she went or when (or if) she would return. When she fought with my friend’s father, she frequently brought my friend into the arguments as a mediator, despite her being a child. “Everything was about her,” my friend says. “Even as an adult, forty years later, everything is still about her.” Whether we are born into families with difficult people, or enter into relationships with them as friends, coworkers, partners, etcetera, it can be challenge to know how to best respond to someone who is emotionally unwell. In order to do so effectively, it is paramount that we understand that the behaviors that are being presented are not our fault, develop firm and clear boundaries about what we will and will […]

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Gluten-Free Salmon with Lime and Sesame Seeds Great for Holidays

Gluten-Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD with Susie Flaherty   Ingredients: 1 1/2 to 2 pounds salmon (wild-caught preferred with skin on) Juice from 2-3 limes Olive Oil Sesame Seeds Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and coat very lightly with olive oil. Place salmon, skin side down, on parchment paper in the pan. Squees the juice of 2-3 limes into a bowl. Use a pastry brush to coat salmon with lime juice. Coat the top of the salmon with sesame seeds. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. Be careful to not overcook.  

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#Art Through Pain #KNOWvember

Dear pain warriors,Each November, U.S. Pain Foundation organizes a month-long educational campaign for the pain community. Recognizing that art and writing can help kids and adults cope with and/or express chronic pain and its effects on their lives, this year’s KNOWvember campaign will focus on creativity.During the month, titled “Art through Pain: How Creativity Helps Us Cope,” U.S. Pain will be:hosting three virtual events, soliciting visual art submissions to showcase at a later date,and highlighting information about art and pain on social media (#ArtThroughPain).If you’d like to submit your artwork, you have the option of sharing it with us privately or allowing us to use it in a future project (such as in a blog post on Remedy or an INvisible Project magazine) through the link below. Submit your artwork >>

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Agoraphobia, Dreams, Trauma and EMDR

In post https://lookingforthelight.blog/2019/07/22/agoraphobia-is-not-logical/ ,‎ I forgot to mention the nightmares that have haunted me and I believe reinforce my agoraphobia. Every dream is based on not being able to get out or leave where I am. Examples, can’t find keys, don’t know what exit to take from store, cars covered in snow, not sure which one is mine. I also dream I’m flying, which I have for a long time, new to my dreams are not being able to see or only seeing a small amount. I’m not real deep into dream interpretation but from what I’ve read the deffinitions could fit. Flying is generally a good sign however it could mean you are fleeing something. Being blind is not wanting to see or face what is before you. I can’t help but think these dreams are aggrevating my agroraphobia and anxiety. Saturday I woke up and during the dream I could not find my car because it was snowed under, then I was flying in a part of town that is an hour away from where I live yet I was trying to get home. Next in the dream I’m in an expensive business suit and enter an auditorium, I’m nervious someone will think I have money and try to rob me so I’m shoving my purse into my breifcase. Then I find and pay phone and fumble for change and someone is standing in my way and won’t move […]

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Gluten-Free Capri Salad *Great for Holiday Gatherings

Ingredients: 2 large tomatoes Fresh basil 1/2 pound Mozzarella di Bufala di Campania (soft mozzarella cheese) 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil Using a bread knife, slice tomatoes thickly in 1/2 inch slices. Select soft mozzarella cheese packaged in water so it remains moist and flavorful (don’t use hard packed mozzarella used for pizza topping.) Carefully slice the mozzarella cheese […]

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Here’s the truth about CBD, from a cannabis researcher

IDEAS.TED.COM Sep 23, 2019 / Jeffrey Chen, MD Is CBD a cure-all — or snake oil? Jeffrey Chen, executive director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, explains the science behind the cannabis product. CBD gummies. CBD shots in your latte. CBD dog biscuits. From spas to drug stores, supermarkets to cafes, wherever you go in the US today, you’re likely to see products infused with CBD. There are cosmetics, vape pens, pills and, of course, the extract itself; there are even CBD-containing sexual lubricants for women which aim to reduce pelvic pain or enhance sensation. CBD has been hailed by some users as having cured their pain, anxiety, insomnia, depression or seizures, and it’s been touted by advertisers as a supplement that can treat all of the above and combat aging and chronic disease. As Executive Director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, I’m dedicated to unearthing the scientific truth — the good and the bad — behind cannabis and CBD. My interest was sparked in 2014 when I was a medical student at UCLA, and I discovered a parent successfully treating her child’s severe epilepsy with CBD. I was surprised and intrigued. Despite California legalizing medical cannabis in 1996, we weren’t taught anything about cannabis or CBD in med school. I did research and found other families and children like Charlotte Figi reporting success with CBD, and I knew it was something that needed to be investigated. I established Cannabis Research Initiative in the fall of 2017, and today we […]

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Why PTSD Is a Mental Injury, Not a Mental Illness

Psychology Today Posted Sep 23, 2019 Tracy S. Hutchinson, Ph.D. New research suggests that PTSD is a normal response to common life events.   According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 7.7 million adults suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Along with a surge of awareness regarding PTSD, there are also many misconceptions. For example, some believe it is only associated with war veterans, events such as 9/11, or natural disasters. Although this diagnosis has historically been associated with military veterans who undergo multiple deployments, there are many other events that can trigger symptoms of PTSD. For example, prolonged exposure to emotional and psychological abuse (e.g., verbally abusive relationships, alcoholism, or stressful childhoods) are risk factors for developing symptoms. Some of these lingering misconceptions may be due to the fact that development and recognition of the disorder is relatively recent and has really only blossomed in the last three decades. History In 1980, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) formally recognized PTSD as an actual mental health diagnosis. Historically, it had been formally recognized as “shell shock” and was thought only to occur in military war veterans. Further, PTSD had historically been thought of as something that someone “gets over” over time. This may be true for some, but it isn’t for others. Researchers continue to discover risk factors that can cause PTSD symptoms. This includes emerging research on the study of what happens in childhood and how it affects adults in their lifetime (van Der Kolk, 2014). For example, some of my clients […]

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You Left Your Job Because of Sexual Harassment. What Now?

OCT 04, 2019 Some victims of workplace sexual harassment are reluctant to report what happened because they fear the effect on their career. For those who leave their job after experiencing harassment or assault, it can be hard to know how to approach a new job search, application, or interview process. “It’s a challenging issue. It’s a difficult scenario that more and more people are being placed in. The main thing is to remember you’re not to blame and this situation doesn’t define you,” says Pete Church, a member of RAINN’s National Leadership Council and Chief Human Resources Officer at Avangrid, a leading sustainable energy company that operates in 24 states. What to do during your search  “If your goal is to assess how a potential employer understands and addresses harassment in the work environment, then there’s a lot of helpful research you can do before you’re in an interview,” Church suggests. He also recommends going on Glassdoor and reading reviews of the company. Even if you don’t see specific mentions of sexual harassment in the reviews, you can learn about the company culture. It can also be helpful to find past employees of a company you’re interested in on LinkedIn. You can reach out for a networking phone call to ask about what their experience was like, about the company culture, and if you feel comfortable doing so, why they left the organization. Approach the situation optimistically and know […]

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Citrus Salt Scrub

Willow and Sage by Stampington By Sarah Hauser You will need: YIELDS 12 oz. 1 cup fine sea salt 1/2 cup grapeseed oil Bowl 15-20 drops citrus essential oils Jar To Make: Mix together the sea salt and the grapeseed oil in a bowl or jar. Add essential oils, and mix well. Transfer to a jar for storing or gifting. […]

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The bias of mental illness — Guest Blogger Shedding Light on Mental Health

When I ask a group of participants to think of all the words associated with someone who has mental illness here’s what I get: crazy, looney, nuts, attention seeking, dangerous, violent, etc. Then I ask the question what are words you hear about a cancer survivor. Those words are: hero, warrior, brave, strong, etc. Then […] The bias of mental illness — Shedding Light on Mental Health

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Keep Speaking Out About Pain

Keep speaking out.My personal path into patient advocacy began with speaking at conferences about my struggle with complex regional pain syndrome, and, then, writing a book about it. But I know first-hand that speaking up isn’t easy–it can leave you feeling vulnerable and exposed, and it requires your already-limited energy and time. That’s why I’m so grateful to each pain warrior […]

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Lyme Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond

 Dear Subscriber, There are a number of things that can block your recovery from Lyme disease. If you have been on antibiotics for six to nine months and you are not getting better, there are additional steps to take. In Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond I describe how to move your treatment forward. In my Seattle practice, I discovered ways to move the treatments forward of my patients. In Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond I describe my formula. Read and watch this article to see if effective treatments are right for you. In Health, Marty Ross MD Read or Watch NowSpread the Word!  ShareTweetForwardQuality Matters. You can find the various supplements I use effectively in my Seattle practice at Marty Ross MD Supplements. Look Now

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Lyme Disease Journal #Five *Scoreboard Lyme-One, Me-Still Standing*

This is a repost from 2014 discussing a Gluten-Free diet. The information is an overview and may help if you’ve been told to start your Gluten-Free journey.  I hope this answers some of your questions and starts you on your way to less inflammation in your life.  Have a great day and always thank you for reading, I appreciate you. I love reading your comments so keep them coming. Melinda  This week I want to give a brief overview on Gluten Free Diet and Epstein Barr Virus. Both where the top searches in last weeks post. I hope the information is helpful. The CDC is a great place to get up to date information. Have a great weekend. 🙂   M Gluten Free What does it mean? My doctor follows The Mayo Clinic, Gluten-free diet: What’s allowed, what’s not. All information taken from The Mayo Clinic outline. A gluten-free diet is a diet that excludes the protein gluten. Gluten is found in grains such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale (a cross between wheat and rye). Gluten causes inflammation in the small intestines. Switching to a gluten-free diet is a big change at first, it takes some getting used to. Many specialty grocery stores sell gluten-free foods. We shop at Whole Foods and have found a large selection of gluten-free products, including brownies. Here are some surprises I discovered. My husband eats many gluten-free products but not exclusively. The Mayo Clinic strongly warns […]

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What are Glutens and how to start a Gluten-Free Lifestyle

It’s important to understand what glutens are and where to look for in order to establish a gluten-free lifestyle. As more people are diagnosed gluten intolerant more pre-made products will become available making choices much easier. I plan to write a number of post on the Gluten-Free lifestyle in the coming months. Below is a short list of items and ingredients you can eat. The Information is taken from Gluten Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD. Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School.  Melinda Gluten is found in common foods such as breads, cereals, baked goods, and pasta. Because it’s used in processed foods as an additive or preservative, gluten is also found in a wide variety of foods and nonfood items from prescription medications to Play-Doh. If you are the food shopper in the family, you must learn to read labels very carefully to comply with gluten-free diet. Things you can eat on the Gluten-Free Diet Gluten-Free Grains, Flours, Seeds and Starches Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Cassava Corn Flaxseed Nut Flours Millet Montina Gluten-Free Oats Quinoa Rice Sago Sorghum Tapioca Teff Wild rice Safe Ingredients List  Vinegar except malt vinegar  Distilled alcohol Carmel color Citric acid Spices Monosodium glutamate Maltodextrin Mono- and diglycerides Artificial flavor and color Natural flavor and color 

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Gluten-Free Basic Salad Dressing and Salads

From Mary Frances McFadden, Jackson Township, New Jersey Basic Salad Dressing Ingredients: 1/2 cup water 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar or white vinegar 1 teaspoon white sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt Pinch of black pepper 1 teaspoon celery seed Fresh herbs of your choice (parsley, rosemary, thyme, dill or other) Cucumber Salad Peel one or two cucumbers and slice into rounds. […]

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Remembering Mom Part 3 – How to Help Your Dementia Loved One — Guest Blogger Hindsight: My Journey

Realizing your parent or any loved one may have dementia is a tough one. I live with the regretful feeling that I should have recognized it sooner. At the time I was absorbed with my own life drama, but that’s no excuse. My hope is that what I learned as a daughter, observer and eventual […] Remembering Mom Part 3 – How to Help Your Dementia Loved One — Hindsight: My Journey

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Billie Eilish opens up about mental health: ‘I didn’t think that I would even make it’ to 17

Charles Trepany, USA TODAYPublished 10:22 a.m. ET Sept. 5, 2019 Billie Eilish is getting real on her mental health. The “Bury a Friend” songstress confessed in her cover story for Elle magazine that, despite early career success, she hasn’t always been happy.  “Two years ago, I felt like nothing mattered; every single thing was pointless,” she said in the article published Thursday. “Not just in my life, but everything in the whole world. I was fully clinically depressed. It’s insane to look back and not be anymore.” Eilish has been accused by trolls of faking her depression, which she admitted have been painful to read. “It hurt me to see that,” she said. “I was a 16-year-old girl who was really unstable. I’m in the happiest place of my life, and I didn’t think that I would even make it to this age.” More: Billie Eilish, 17, rips Nylon Germany for topless cover: I ‘did not consent in any way’ The 17-year-old said her mental health has since improved, calling happiness a “crazy” feeling. “I haven’t been happy for years,” she said. “I didn’t think I would be happy again. And here I am—I’ve gotten to a point where I’m finally okay. It’s not because I’m famous. It’s not because I have a little more money. It’s so many different things: growing up, people coming into your life, certain people leaving your life.” More: Believe the hype: Billie Eilish proves she’s a once-in-a-generation talent at NYC concert The singer added […]

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Reusable Dryer Sheets

Willow and Sage by Stampington You will need 2 1/2 cups water 2 1/2 cups white vinegar 3-4 TB. vegetable glycerin Jar with sealed lid: large wide mouth 12 drops orange essential oil 12 drops lemon essential oil 7 drops lavender essential oil 7 drops peppermint essential oil Cotton quilting squares/washcloths To Make Add water, white vinegar and vegetable glycerin […]

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Men’s Eating Disorders Often Not Recognized

WEBMD HEALTH NEWS By Jennifer Clopton Sept. 5, 2019 — Nevada mom Ashley says she became worried when her 10-year-old son, Jordon, started to restrict his snacks and excessively work out. But even as he lost weight, she and her husband didn’t realize the extent or true cause of the problem. Like all the parents quoted in this story, she asked that her last name not be used to protect her son’s privacy. Ashley wasn’t the only one who failed to identify what was happening. Her husband thought their son was having a growth spurt. A nutritionist called it “a phase.” The emergency room doctor she sought out when she didn’t know where else to turn attributed his weight loss to being active and involved in sports. The ER doctor also said they needed to follow up with a pediatric oncologist to make sure Jordan didn’t have cancer. “He basically told my son to add smoothies to his diet, and he jumped to cancer as a possibility,” Ashley says. Ashley had to wait 3 weeks before a pediatric oncologist could see her son. But thankfully, he knew exactly what was going on. “He pulled my husband and I aside and said, ‘Your son doesn’t have cancer. He has an eating disorder.’” “I look back at pictures now and think, how did we miss it? But we were around him all the time, and we saw him eating. We didn’t realize how much he was exercising though, and we […]

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Camila Cabello just shared the simple self-help technique she uses to overcome her anxiety

People Posted byChristobel Hastings Published16 days ago Camila Cabello is no stranger to speaking out about her mental healthstruggles, and in a bid to raise awareness of the effects of anxiety, the singer shared the self-help technique she turns to when she’s feeling overwhelmed by the chaos of everyday life. In an age when our perception of the world is so often viewed through a heavily filtered lens, it can be tough to keep a cultivate a positive self-image. But despite the heavily-filtered images and aspirational messages we consume on our social media feeds, more and more celebrities are taking steps to break through the illusion of perfection and present a more nuanced reality. One star leading the way when it comes to disrupting the narrative is Camila Cabello. The singer is no stranger to speaking out about her struggles with mental health, and in a candid note to her followers last month, she opened up about her experiences with anxiety, and the ways she’s learned to cope with being “incredibly nervous” and “socially anxious.” This time around the Señorita singer is continuing her mental health conversation by sharing the coping mechanism she turns to when she’s feeling overwhelmed: breathing exercises. Taking to Instagram, the singer posted a long note to her followers acknowledging that she has the power to influence positive change in people’s lives through her social media platform, even if in “small ways.” “To anyone on here who is struggling, which we all do […]

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Knowledge Is Power but Experience Tells the Real Story

  National Pain Report Posted on August 26, 2019 by Denise Hedley There is something about being chronically ill that makes us need to know everything there is to know about what is wrong with our bodies. This, of course, gets us in trouble on occasion when the doctors take our knowledge of medical terminology and turn it around as proof that we are faking it. I guess they didn’t get the memo. Chronic pain does not mean chronic stupidity. We actually care. We are actively participating in our own care teams. We have gained a frightening amount of medical knowledge over the years just trying to understand our conditions. We know our bodies better than most. We deal with more in a short period of time, say during a flare, than many people deal within their lifetime. That is in addition to what we deal with when we’re not in a flare. For us, the pain never really goes away. Our experience adds to the knowledge we have accumulated. It enables us to cope with what is going on. It enables us to forge ahead through the abyss of opioid lies and laws that do little more than minimize our very existence. Denise Hedley I think we need to stand up and loudly use that knowledge because it is backed by our experience. Those who have been responsible for the faux crisis have limited knowledge. They only know the scientific […]

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Let’s Talk About Pain

Dear pain warriors, At U.S. Pain Foundation, we deeply believe in the power of sharing patient stories. Talking about our experiences with pain helps us to educate others, to create change, and to offer hope. That’s why our theme for Pain Awareness Month 2019, which begins Sunday, is #LetsTalkAboutPain.I first got involved in patient advocacy by writing a book about my experiences with complex regional pain syndrome. It enabled me to process my personal journey, take control of my story, and help create awareness for those like me. I hope speaking up about pain this September can do the same for you. This year, we have dozens of opportunities for you to help bring pain to the forefront of public conversations, ranging from our daily storyathon to social media giveaways to weekly events.All of these activities are presented in collaboration with our generous sponsor, Thrive Tape, the creator of an innovative, far-infrared kinesiology tape for all types of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. (We encourage you to check them out! Use the code USPAIN for a discount.)How you can participateWe have something for everyone! Most activities are online, which means you can take part from the comfort of your home. Storyathon. Each day in September, U.S. Pain will be sharing a video story of a real person living with pain. These individuals–from all walks of life–bravely submitted their personal stories in August to help create awareness. To watch the videos, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Missed the video storyathon deadline? Share […]

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The Simple Guide to Value Triggers

Psychology Today   How to live by your highest ideals. Posted Aug 11, 2019 Steven C. Hayes Ph.D. Get Out of Your Mind Source: Pixabay/CC Being in touch with your values is essential to living a rich and meaningful life. By knowing what you care about most, you become inspired to live by your highest ideals, bringing out the best in yourself. In short, values help you find direction, meaning, and inspiration in life. Unfortunately, however, it’s more complicated than this. Because too often enough, we get sidetracked. Too often, the demands of the day pull our attention away from what really matters, to serve our immediate emotional needs. We then lose touch of our ideals, and revert back to old – often destructive – habits. If you wish to stop this from happening, break the cycle of bad habits, and bring forth the best of yourself, you have to reconnect with your values whenever you lose touch. And the easiest way to accomplish this, are value triggers. What Are Value Triggers? A value trigger is a physical reminder of your core values. By merely looking at it, you refocus back on what matters most, making you act more in line with your highest ideals. The trigger can be almost anything, as long as it makes you remember your values. Here are a few ideas: Card in Wallet. Write down a few core values on an index card, and put it in your […]

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My Lyme Data Chart Book

How many participants in the MyLymeData patient registry ever had a Lyme-related rash? (34%) How many initially presented with flu-like symptoms? (64%) How many were misdiagnosed with a psychiatric illness? (54%) These are some of the details you can learn in the MyLymeData 2019 Chart Book. This report is a compilation of our research results based on more than 2.5 […]

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23andMe Explores Dietary Habit and Health Outcomes

August 6, 2019 By 23andMe under 23andMe Research By Rafaela Bagur Quetglas, PhD You are what you eat, is the old adage, but what does your diet actually say about you?  23andMe has a unique opportunity to explore that question, as we investigate how dietary habits, along with genetics, demographics, lifestyle and other data can influence overall health outcomes. Looking at diet specifically, our scientists analyzed the data of more than 850,000 people who consented to participate in research and who shared details about their own eating habits.  Using machine learning techniques* we were able to see that dietary choices clustered into four distinct types of eaters, which were mainly characterized by two dietary behaviors. The first one represents the spectrum of foods’ nutrient content from high nutrient-dense foods (i.e. low caloric foods with high nutrient content like vegetables, leafy greens, fruit, beans or whole-grains) to low nutrient-dense foods (i.e. high caloric foods with low nutrient content like. processed foods, sweets, sodas, pastries, saturated fats or  fast food). The second main behavior differentiating diet groups is the meat intake, in particular, red and processed meat (e.g., sausages, hot dogs, ham, or cured bacon).   Dietary Types Using these two behaviors as axes, we can plot the four main diet groups:  On one end, we find people who eat high nutrient-dense (HND) foods like  vegetables, leafy greens and fruits and tend to avoid high caloric foods with low nutrient content like refined carbs, processed foods, saturated […]

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Natural Seasonal Allergy Relief

Willow & Sage by Stampington By Kaetlyn Kennedy   Nettle Leaf Tea Made from stinging nettle plants, organic nettle tea can help relieve seasonal allergy symptoms with it’s natural antihistamine. You reap all the benefits of antihistamine symptom relief without having to take conventional medicines. You can drink the daily as a preventative or as needed.   Spirulina & Other […]

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Bring Change to Mind Partners with Mental Health for US

 Bring Change to Mind is excited to announce that we have partnered with Mental Health for US, a nonpartisan educational initiative focused on elevating mental health and addiction in policy conversations by empowering grassroots advocates and improving candidate and policymaker health literacy. The initiative is powered by a coalition of stakeholder groups from around the country dedicated to uniting the American people to make systemic, long-term change with civic engagement tools and resources.  The movement launched at The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s 10th Annual Advocacy Forum by former U.S. Representative and co-chair of the Mental Health for US initiative Patrick J. Kennedy (D-R.I.). Former U.S. Senator Gordon H. Smith (R-OR), a long-time mental health advocate, will also serve as co-chair. “The suicide rate has skyrocketed over the past 20 years because mental health and substance use disorders often go undetected and undertreated,” said Sen. Smith. “Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in America. Now more than ever, we need our government leaders to stand up and champion systemic change. We have to make our voices heard.”  Join us in building this movement of change!   Learn More About Mental Health for Us 

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What is Endometriosis?

Originally posted on Dr. Lori Gore-Green:
Reproductive health must be taken very seriously, which is why women should understand what endometriosis is. It is often a painful disorder inside of the uterus and involves the fallopian tubes, ovaries, and tissue lining the pelvis. and can go undiagnosed for years. Unfortunately, it can lead to infertility. Defining Endometriosis Endometriosis is when tissue that makes up the uterine lining is present on other organs inside your body. It usually appears to happen within the pelvis and lower abdomen, but it can happen anywhere in the body. Although men can be affected by the disorder, it is extremely rare and most common in women.  The Symptoms Women can experience pain during intercourse, painful periods, lower abdomen pain, and infertility. Over time, unfortunately, pain can increase and become more intense. Some may also experience painful bowel movements and heavy menstruation. Other symptoms can range from bloating, nausea, constipation, fatigue, and diarrhea, especially during their periods. The more severe the pain usually indicates how severe the disorder is. Pain can be the most painful symptom, but some women do not experience any symptoms.  Due to these symptoms, endometriosis can be often misdiagnosed. It can often be diagnosed as a pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or ovarian cysts. Endometriosis also shares the same symptoms as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which can complicate the diagnosis. Causes Unfortunately, the exact causes of endometriosis are unknown, but there are possible…

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What are Glutens and how to start a Gluten-Free Lifestyle

It’s important to understand what glutens are and where to look for in order to establish a gluten-free lifestyle. As more people are diagnosed gluten intolerant more pre-made products will become available making choices much easier. I plan to write a number of post on the Gluten-Free lifestyle in the coming months. Below is a short list of items and ingredients you can eat. The Information is taken from Gluten Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD. Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School.  Melinda Gluten is found in common foods such as breads, cereals, baked goods, and pasta. Because it’s used in processed foods as an additive or preservative, gluten is also found in a wide variety of foods and nonfood items from prescription medications to Play-Doh. If you are the food shopper in the family, you must learn to read labels very carefully to comply with gluten-free diet. Things you can eat on the Gluten-Free Diet Gluten-Free Grains, Flours, Seeds and Starches Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Cassava Corn Flaxseed Nut Flours Millet Montina Gluten-Free Oats Quinoa Rice Sago Sorghum Tapioca Teff Wild rice Safe Ingredients List  Vinegar except malt vinegar  Distilled alcohol Carmel color Citric acid Spices Monosodium glutamate Maltodextrin Mono- and diglycerides Artificial flavor and color Natural flavor and color 

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Find Delight in Different Forms of Stillness

“Stillness” can sound sentimental but it’s what most of us long for. Psychology Today Posted Jul 29, 2019  Rick Hanson Ph.D. Your Wise Brain What is your sense of stillness? “Stillness or peace” may sound merely sentimental (“visualize whirled peas”). But deep down, it’s what most of us long for. Consider the proverb: The highest happiness is stillness. Not a stillness or […]

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Prevent unnecessary medical care — by asking your doctor these 4 questions first

TED TALKS Jul 22, 2019 / Daryl Chen Justin Tran By raising questions and taking on a more active role in decision making, patients can do their part to avoid needless medications, tests, treatments or procedures, says neurosurgeon Christer Mjåset. This post is part of TED’s “How to Be a Better Human” series, each of which contains a piece of helpful advice […]

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Mini Me Health Update

My Parathyroid surgery was July 8th and I’m healing nicely. The surgeon found quite a surprise, I had five Parathyroids instead of four. She said it was rare. I hope that translates to feeling all the better. She is getting my calcium levels adjusted and it was painful in the beginning with cramping legs and numb fingers. It’s not what […]

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How Grief Shows Up In Your Body

WEB MD By Stephanie Hairston July 11, 2019 — It’s surprising how physical grief can be. Your heart literally aches. A memory comes up that causes your stomach to clench or a chill to run down your spine. Some nights, your mind races, and your heart races along with it, your body so electrified with energy that you can barely sleep. Other nights, you’re so tired that you fall asleep right away. You wake up the next morning still feeling exhausted and spend most of the day in bed. Amy Davis, a 32-year-old from Bristol, TN, became sick with grief after losing Molly, a close 38-year-old family member, to cancer. “Early grief was intensely physical for me,” Davis says. “After the shock and adrenaline of the first weeks wore off, I went through a couple of months of extreme fatigue, with nausea, headaches, food aversion, mixed-up sleep cycles, dizziness, and sun sensitivity. It was extremely difficult to do anything. … If there’s one thing I want people to know about grief, it’s how awful it can make your body feel.” What causes these physical symptoms? A range of studies reveal the powerful effects grief can have on the body. Grief increases inflammation, which can worsen health problems you already have and cause new ones. It batters the immune system, leaving you depleted and vulnerable to infection. The heartbreak of grief can increase blood pressure and the risk of blood clots. Intense grief can alter the […]

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Agrophobia Is Not Logical

Whatever this obstacle is, it started 18 months ago, there wasn’t a moment I can pin this inability on. Inability is the right word, I’m not afraid to leave the house, I’ve driven a few times in the past year, I know how to drive and live in the same town. Yet I have my husband take me to all […]

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Natural Seasonal Allergy Relief

Willow & Sage by Stampington By Kaetlyn Kennedy   Nettle Leaf Tea Made from stinging nettle plants, organic nettle tea can help relieve seasonal allergy symptoms with it’s natural antihistamine. You reap all the benefits of antihistamine symptom relief without having to take conventional medicines. You can drink the daily as a preventative or as needed.   Spirulina & Other […]

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Mini Health Update

I have Thyroid & Parathyroid surgery tomorrow and will be out of pocket for a couple of weeks. Ok, it will be hard to stay completely away but considering moving my neck in any direction will hurt, I won’t spend much time on WordPress. Please don’t stop the comments, I’ll take all the encouragement I can get. There are tumors […]

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Caregiver to Grieving in Four Days

Each day was a roller coaster by how he felt and how exhausted I was. I learned so much being a caregiver to my grandmother and grandfather. As the population ages many of you will take on the responsibility. One of the most difficult changes was going from granddaughter to caregiver. Even at 92 my grandfather had a strong mind and felt he didn’t need help. I prayer for strength everyday. My grandfather died in 2010 at the young age of 92 years old. I spent more time with him 2010 year than I spent at home. I cherish the time we had together, no matter how painful. They are my memories and my life changed forever with his death. His health declined so fast that for two days I did not realize that he was dying now, not in a couple of weeks. He was at home under hospice care and would not get in the hospital bed until two days before he passed. He fell out of bed that morning, he was so weak it was difficult for me to get him back in bed. I don’t think we would have been able to talk him into moving to the hospital bed if he had not fallen. For him the bed meant death and he was still fighting. My grandfather had End Stage Kidney Disease. An emergency trip to the hospital for his AFIB is how we learned he had about two months to live. We knew his kidneys were losing function but I was not ready for […]

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Lost in Caregiver Twilight Zone

Written on 12/21/2009 I’m caring for my 92-year-old grandfather following three surgeries in seven days. I’m so tired it’s numbing, it’s impossible to think about doing it again tomorrow.  My grandfather is a man of habits driven by the time of day, maybe from his military background. One morning he was upset when the hospital had not brought his coffee and could not see he was the problem. We’re in a hospital not the Hilton. At home it was far worse. It does not matter that I have changed the sheets again this morning, changed his soiled underpants more than once and got him dressed for the day. If the coffee is not ready when he expects or I don’t have the newspaper yet, I hear about it. My grandparents raised me and I love my grandfather dearly but it’s hard to bite my tongue. I want to ask doesn’t he realize or care that I’ve been moving since 5:00 a.m. to take care of him. At 92 he lives at home alone, still drives (very limited), buys groceries and goes to the local Senior Center several times a week to play dominos. He amazes me with each year. He is the healthiest dying person I know and in his mind he is much younger and more capable. This makes it impossible for him to understand recovery will take several more weeks at least. I catch him doing things he […]

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This NBA Superstar Used 2 (Surprising) Words to Teach a Valuable Lesson in Emotional Intelligence

By Justin BarisoFounder, Insight It’s rare for professional athletes to admit weakness. It’s even rarer for them to do this. As the Toronto Raptors and Golden State Warriors continue their slugfest to determine the NBA’s 2019 champion, one player is already preparing for next season: The Milwaukee Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo. Not that long ago it appeared that Antetokounmpo and the Bucks would be playing the Warriors for this year’s championship. The Bucks had cruised through the playoffs, and were up two games to zero against the Toronto Raptors. But the Raptors went on to win the next four games in a row–a remarkable feat considering the Bucks hadn’t lost three games in a row the entire season. The Raptors managed to defeat the Bucks by tooling their defense to focus on stopping the young team’s star (who’s affectionately known as “the Greek Freak” due to his Athens upbringing and monstrous athletic prowess). In a recent interview with The Athletic, Antetokounmpo acknowledged that Raptors players Kawhi Leonard and Marc Gasol gave him particular trouble. Giannis admitted that now the series is over, “every day in his head,” he continues to see Gasol and Leonard coming at him. Then, Antetokounmpo went on to say something remarkable to his opponents: “Thank you. Thank you, because Gasol and Kawhi made me a better player. I’m not trying to be sarcastic. I’m being honest. They’re going to push me to be better.” “Thank you.” It’s rare for professional athletes to admit weakness or to credit opposing players for […]

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23andMe Scientist to Present Data on the Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes at American Diabetes Association Conference

June 3, 2019 By 23andMe under 23andMe Research, Education By Eloycsia Ratliff, MPH, 23andMe Medical Education Project Manager We know that diet and exercise play an important role in a person’s likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, but what role does genetics play? That’s a question 23andMe researchers have been investigating, and at a meeting of the American Diabetes Associations (ADA) Annual Conference on June […]

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Anesthesia for Chronic Pain?

  Ketamine is an anesthesia used since the 1960s and has since been proven to work for Chronic Pain and Mental Illness. My pain levels have been through the roof and walking the last 15 days has been difficult. I made the decision to try something radically different. I had my first Ketamine treatment was yesterday. I  read about the LSD […]

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America’s Mental Health Crisis-Bring Change to Mind

Bring Change To Mind Washington Post Live     Last week, our Co-Founder Glenn Close spent the day on Capitol Hill at the invitation of U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) to advocate for Stabenow’s Excellence in Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Expansion Act.This legislation would renew and expand funding for clinics that provide a comprehensive set of mental health and addiction treatment services. Glenn started the day with a Washington Post Live event on mental health and the addiction crisis and participated in a number of meetings with House and Senate leaders throughout the rest of the day.Photo: BC2M Co-Founder Glenn Close, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (R-MO), and U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI).  Learn More

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What Are Parabens—and Do I Need to Worry About Them?

Real Simple By Eleni N. Gage Updated: October 12, 2017   These preservatives are common, but health concerns have cropped up.  Parabens have been widely used in products to prevent bacteria growth since the 1950s. “About 85 percent of cosmetics have them,” says Arthur Rich, Ph.D., a cosmetic chemist in Chestnut Ridge, New York. “They’re inexpensive and effective.” New York City dermatologist […]

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Prince Harry and Oprah Winfrey are joining forces on a new documentary series about mental health and well-being.

by Imogen Calderwood  April 16, 2019 The pair will be co-creators and executive producers of the series, according to an announcement on Wednesday from Kensington Palace via Harry and Meghan’s new Instagram account, SussexRoyal.  The multi-part series is due to be broadcast next year on the recently announced US streaming service, Apple TV+, which will launch this autumn. It’s not yet known, however, how viewers in the UK will be able to watch.  According to the statement, the show will “focus on both mental illness and mental wellness, inspiring viewers to have an honest conversation about the challenges each of us faces, and how to equip ourselves with the tools to not simply survive, but to thrive.”  The palace said the series would build on the Duke of Sussex’s extensive work on mental health.   Instagram Harry has previously spoken out about the “quite serious effect” the death of his mother, Princess Diana, had on his life, and said that he has “probably been very close to a complete breakdown on numerous occasions.”  “I truly believe that good mental health — mental fitness — is the key to powerful leadership, productive communities, and a purpose-driven self,” said Harry, in a statement about the documentary.  He also revealed that he feels the “huge responsibility to get this right as we bring you the facts, the science, and the awareness of a subject that is so relevant during these times.” “Our hope is that this series will be positive, enlightening, and inclusive — […]

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Almohadillas desmaquillantes caseras

Sauce y sabio por Stampington Necesitará alrededor de 14 almohadillas de algodón2 TB. bruja hazel1 TB. aloe vera gel1 TSP. aceite de almendras dulces 1/4 TSP. Jabón de castilla Jarra de 4 oz con almohadillas faciales de algodón con tapa 14 Para hacer Agregue los ingredientes a una jarra de 4 onzas. Agitar suavemente el frasco para combinar los ingredientes. Agregue las almohadillas faciales de algodón al frasco, presionando las almohadillas hacia abajo en la liguid. Las almohadillas absorberán la mayor parte (o todo) del líquido. Asegure la tapa del frasco y guárdela en la teperuture de la habitación. Para usar Quite la almohadilla facial humedecida de la jarra y limpie su cara con ambos lados de la almohadilla para quitar el maquillaje. Lávese la cara con un limpiador facial después de usar las toallitas. Dado que la solución solo contiene 14 almohadillas faciales, necesitará hacer una nueva solución cada dos semanas.

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PAIN COMMUNITY UNITES TO RESPOND TO FEDERAL DRAFT REPORT

May 1, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation The 90-day public comment period for the Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force’s (PMTF) draft report came to a close April 1, with more than 6,000 individuals and organizations submitting feedback. Among those to comment was the Consumer Pain Advocacy Task Force (CPATF), a coalition of pain patient-related nonprofits, including U.S. Pain Foundation, which submitted a 25-page joint letter. In addition to U.S. Pain Foundation, the CPATF letter was signed by the Center for Practical Bioethics; CHAMP (Coalition For Headache And Migraine Patients); Chronic Pain Research Alliance; For Grace: Women In Pain; Global Healthy Living Foundation; Headache and Migraine Policy Forum; International Pain Foundation; Interstitial Cystitis Association; RSDSA (Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association); and The Pain Community. “We are very grateful that so many patient organizations joined together to respond to this report with one, unified voice,” says Cindy Steinberg, U.S. Pain Foundation’s National Director of Policy and Advocacy and the only patient advocacy representative on the PMTF. “While the draft report holds a lot of promise, from the patient perspective, we had a number of important suggestions for ways to improve or expand on its recommendations.” Of note, the CPATF letter commends the draft report’s emphasis on individualized care and encouraged further emphasis of that point. CPATF also urges PMTF to go further and recommend that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) formally revise and reissue their 2016 guidelines on opioid prescribing […]

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CLEARING UP 12 COMMON MYTHS ABOUT MEDICAL CANNABIS FOR PAIN

April 18, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation   Ellen Lenox Smith is Co-Director of Medical Cannabis for U.S. Pain and a U.S. Pain Board Member. She lives with two rare conditions: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and sarcoidosis. After years of struggling to find pain relief without side effects or adverse reactions, she discovered medical cannabis. A retired school teacher, Ellen is now a renowned patient advocate and works tirelessly to encourage safe, fair access to all treatment options, particularly medical cannabis. She has spoken at numerous conferences on cannabis access and been featured widely in the media on the topic. She is also the author of two books: It Hurts Like Hell!: I Live With Pain—And Have A Good Life Anyway and My Life as a Service Dog. Below, she clears up common myths surrounding medical cannabis for pain. MYTH #1: ALL  PEOPLE WHO USE CANNABIS MUST BE “STONED” OR “HIGH.” Truth: this only happens if you use too much medication. People living with pain get pain relief; people using it socially and not in pain, get high! In addition, medical cannabis is made of two components: THC, which causes the mental effects associated with feeling high, and CBD, which produces bodily effects. Various strains of cannabis have different ratios of THC and CBD, which means that not all strains create as much of a “high” feeling. MYTH #2: EVERYONE WHO USES THE SAME STRAIN EXPERIENCES THE SAME RESULT TO USING IT. Truth: Each body can have […]

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PAIN CONNECTION ADDS FOUR SUPPORT GROUPS AND NEW MONTHLY CALL

May 1, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation   Finding community support is essential to living with chronic pain. With that in mind, Pain Connection, a program of U.S. Pain Foundation, continues to expand its in-person and conference call support group offerings nationwide. Along with three existing monthly “Pain Connection Live” support group calls, there will now be a morning call on the third Thursday of each month from 10-11 am EST. The first call will be May 16. Existing calls are held on one evening, one afternoon, and one Saturday each month. To learn more or register for a Pain Connection Live call, click here. In addition, four new in-person support groups have been added in CA, AL, and NJ. All support groups are led by a person with pain who has received intensive training from Gwenn Herman, LCSW, DCSW, Clinical Director of Pain Connection. Costa Mesa, CA  Date: Second Tuesday of each month. The next meeting is May 14. Time: 11 am – 1 pm Location: Panera Bread at 3030 Harbor Boulevard, Costa Mesa, CA. (Meet against the back wall.) Contact: Kristie McCurdy, MSN, RN, at CRPSsurvivorsOC@gmail.com San Francisco, CA Date: Second and fourth Friday of each month. The next meetings are May 10 and May 24. Time: 12 – 1 pm Location: 1701 Divisedero Street, 5th floor conference room, San Francisco, CA. (Elevator available.) Contact: Cessa Marshal at cessamarshall@yahoo.com or 415-637-1812. Pell City, ALDate: The first meeting will be May 2. Time: 6-7:30 pm. Location: The Brook Besor Coffee Shop, 4204 Martin St. S., Cropwell, AL […]

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FDA, CDC REACT TO HARM TO PAIN PATIENTS

May 1, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation Last month, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reacted to the unintended harm to people living with chronic pain as a result of policy measures intended to ameliorate the opioid crisis. On April 9, the FDA issued a Safety Announcement citing “serious harm,” including “withdrawal symptoms, uncontrolled pain, psychological distress and suicide” as a result of sudden discontinuation or rapid dose decreases in opioid pain medication. The FDA will now require changes to the prescribing information for health care professionals that will provide guidance on how to safely reduce or taper patients off opioid medications. The agency states that there is no standard opioid tapering schedule; rather, a schedule must be tailored to each patient’s unique situation considering a variety of factors, including the type of pain the patient has. The FDA is also warning patients not to suddenly stop taking their opioid medication, as this can result in serious problems. Even when patients gradually reduce these medications, they may still experience withdrawal symptoms such as chills and muscle aches. If these are excessive, patients are encouraged to contact their health care provider. Feeling the pressure from the FDA action, a letter from more than 300 health care practitioners, and increasing news coverage of harms to people with pain, three CDC Guideline authors, writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, said the Guidelines have been misapplied and applied inflexibly in […]

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What doctors don’t learn about death and dying

IDEAS TED.COM Oct 31, 2014 / Atul Gawande Dying and death confront every new doctor and nurse. In this book excerpt, Atul Gawande asks: Why are we not trained to cope with mortality?     I learned about a lot of things in medical school, but mortality wasn’t one of them. I was given a dry, leathery corpse to dissect in my first term — but that was solely a way to learn about human anatomy. Our textbooks had almost nothing on aging or frailty or dying. How the process unfolds, how people experience the end of their lives and how it affects those around them? That all seemed beside the point. The way we saw it — and the way our professors saw it — the purpose of medical schooling was to teach us how to save lives, not how to tend to their demise. The one time I remember discussing mortality was during an hour we spent on The Death of Ivan Ilyich, Tolstoy’s classic novella. It was in a weekly seminar called Patient-Doctor — part of the school’s effort to make us more rounded and humane physicians. Some weeks we would practice our physical examination etiquette; other weeks we’d learn about the effects of socioeconomics and race on health. And one afternoon we contemplated the suffering of Ivan Ilyich as he lay ill and worsening from some unnamed, untreatable disease. The first times, some cry. Some shut down. Some hardly notice. […]

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The messy, complicated truth about grief

IDEAS TED TALKS May 1, 2019 / Nora McInerny Mourning the loss of a loved one isn’t efficient, compact or logical, and it changes us forever, says writer Nora McInerny. She explains why. I quit my job shortly after my husband Aaron died in 2014 following three years with brain cancer. It made sense in the moment, but I needed money to keep my son and myself alive so I went to a networking event to hopefully make connections. I was introduced to a successful woman in her early 70s who everyone referred to as a “legend.” She wanted to meet me for coffee and I thought, “What could she possibly see in me?” What she saw in me was herself. She had been 16 when her boyfriend died. He was her first love and they were teenagers in a different era, when it was perfectly plausible that you would be married after high school. Instead, he went to the hospital one day and never came back. She learned later that he’d died of cancer, which his parents had kept secret from him and from his friends. They didn’t know how to talk about it, and they didn’t want him or his friends to worry. This boy had died decades ago. She was married, a mother and a grandmother. And she told me about his death as if it had happened weeks ago, as if she were still 16, still shocked and confused that […]

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U.S. Pain Foundation

U.S. Pain Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to improving the lives of people with chronic conditions that cause pain. HERE ARE SOME OF THE PROGRAMS WE OFFER: Awareness & Advocacy Programs INvisible Project Advocacy Program Pain Awareness Month Points For Pain Medical Cannabis Program Support & Empowerment Programs Pain Connection Pain Ambassador Network Pediatric Pain Warriors Share Your Story Education Programs Take Control of Your Pain Learn About Your Pain Pain Medicine 411 Pain Education Portal (PEP) Talks Clinical Programs National Coalition of Chronic Pain Providers and Professionals To learn more, visit: uspainfoundation.org Melinda Sandor Ambassador-Texas U.S. Pain Foundation

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I’ve Been Nominated For The Disability Award

I’m blown away Stacey Chapman at https://fightingwithfibro.com awarded me The Disability Award. You have to check out her site, here’s the original award post,  https://fightingwithfibro.com/2019/04/27/the-disability-award/ Her sunny personality welcomes you with every post, she’s informative, topics are fresh, up to date and she reviews products we might be interested in. She is very knowledgeable. Following her is a must. As part of my nomination, I choose other Disability Bloggers to give this award to. They are as follows: Wendy at  simplychronicallyill.wordpress.com Patricia at  https://patriciajgrace.wordpress.com Colly at https://dopaminequeen.com Alyssia at https://fightingmsdaily.com Mackenzie at lifewithanillness.com Robert at https://robertmgoldstien.com Gavin at https://sedge.com Nominees: Please answer the questions, choose your own nominees and develop your own set of questions. Stacey’s questions are so good I’m going with her’s. Display the award badge. What was the first sign of your illness? My chest and right clavicle starting hurting and would not go away for months. What is your worst symptom and how do you cope with it? Whatever it takes, pain meds, a nap, meditation, looking at the flower garden, put feet in the pool, letting them float. What one thing about you has changed as a result of your struggles? I understand people with all types of disabilities better. What words of advice or encouragement would you give to someone else suffering? Accept it, embrace your illness as part of your daily life and work on what relieves your pain. Name one good thing that has come out of having […]

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VATIC Foundation’s Support for Trauma and PTSD

  This organization is doing amazing work by helping people transition from a traumatic event. They offer support for those who suffer trauma-related symptoms and PTSD. Please visit their website, https://vaticfoundation.com for more information.  M OUR MISSION AT THE VATIC FOUNDATION After a traumatic experience, you will go through a period of transition. The Vatic Foundation backs people during the transitional phase who are wanting to start a new career or finish post-secondary education. The heart of the VATIC Foundation is to offer a lending hand to any individual recovering from a trauma-related event/PTSD. Our foundation awards educational grants to individuals looking for a new start. Our Aim: Ensure new career paths are met, Encourage participation in our community; Contribute a positive means for coping; Provide awareness; Protect people from further psychological harm; Return individuals to familiar routines; Make sure you’re not alone after a traumatic event. What does this mean for the VATIC Foundation?  It’s a cut-and-dried response; Our goal is to remain outspoken about mental health, trauma, PTSD, Complex-PTSD, while delivering the groundwork, strength, courage, or even the confidence we depend upon during a period of desolation.

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Frizzy Hair Remedies

    Willow & Sage by Stampington At Home Remedies While regular conditioning is helpful to tame frizzy hair, there are more remedies that smooth the outer layer of hair while reparing it for healthy growing. Applying any of the following treatments can improve shine and make hair more managable. Honey Coconut Hot Oil Treatment You will need 1 TB. […]

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Parathyroid/Health Overview

If calcium levels are low the body goes to your bones to look for calcium, this can lead to Osteoporosis. Anytime your calcium levels are high it shows the Parathyroid is working overtime trying to level your calcium, high calcium is a serious condition. All four of my Parathyroid Glands are not functioning properly and I have the beginning stages of Osteoporosis in my right hip. I have tumors on all four glands, two are small and the two lowers glands have tumors approx. 3-4 inches long. The surgeon will remove and possibly all four once the surgeon takes a look. The surgery itself is only 15-30 minutes with total recovery time approx. three weeks. I am waiting on my surgeon for the surgery date, I expect the surgery to happen in next two weeks. Please, read description and graphic below.  I’ll keep you posted on how the surgery goes and any other information I learn. M You have four Parathyroid Glands on the backside of the Thyroid, they are very small but play a very important role in your health, they keep calcium levels in the body and if calcium level become low the Parathriod Gland produces more hormone to compensate for the low calcium levels.   Illustration of the 4 parathyroid glands located on the back side of the thyroid. We all have 4 parathyroid glands.Parathyroid glands control the amount of calcium in our blood. Everyone has four parathyroid glands, usually […]

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How Many Pills A Day?

44 pills a day Most of the medications I take are for Mental Illness and Chronic Illnesses. I am blessed we have good insurance which covers most of the cost. There are two prescriptions that cost over $500 after coverage. I don’t like to take pills and can only take one at a time which can take 10 minutes to […]

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Medication Check List

How often do you update your medication checklist with all of your doctors? I make a habit of taking an updated list to every appointment. It’s up to me to keep everyone informed. That doesn’t mean side effects or mishaps don’t happen. I fired my Lyme doctor because he prescribed medicine in a class I was already taking. In this case, drugs from that class don’t mix with another in that category. It made me Psychotic for a week, walking in circles in the house 24 hours a day, I thought I learned a new language and was with my tribe of Indians. It was a horrible experience. It was half of my responsibility, doctors dispense too many medications to know all the side effects. My habit is to go to FDA.gov and read the Prescribing Instructions from the manufacturer. I can read all the side effect data and know what to look out for. In this case, I had put the medication aside for a week because I was too sick to look up the information and too stubborn to ask my husband for help. I paid the price. We have to manage our medications along with the doctor, they only have 15 minutes at best and most of the time new prescriptions aren’t written till the end of an appointment. Read the information given by the pharmacy. The information will at least include the most common side effects […]

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Constantly Evolving: Puberty and Menstruation — Guest Blogger Dr. Lori Gore-Green

Constantly evolving is a new series documenting the ways in which women’s bodies change. Based on the time of the month or period of life, the series hopes to highlight the magnificence of the woman’s body. The previous “Constantly Evolving” article focused on external physical changes girls experience when going through puberty. In conjunction […] Constantly Evolving: Puberty and Menstruation — Dr. Lori Gore-Green

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What You’re Missing If You Think Self-Care Is Just Candles And Bubble Baths

Womens Health By Marissa GainsburgApr 2, 2019 Pampering yourself is great, but challenging yourself? Way better.  I can’t believe I did that. The words flashed through my head over and over like a GIF as I walked alongside thousands of exhausted runners to exit Central Park. I’d just crossed the finish line of the TCS New York City Marathon—my first 26.2—and my cheeks, wrinkled up to my eyes, ached almost as much as my legs. When a photographer snapped a picture, I broke out in happy tears until a weird but powerful calm came over me. I can’t. Believe. I did that. It’s a sentiment I’d chased several times over the past year, the first on a rock-climbing trip in Joshua Tree National Park, then during an intensive hike up two “14ers” (mountain slang for Colorado’s multiple peaks exceeding 14,000 feet). I’d spent months training for each of the three events, dedicating weekdays and Saturdays to workouts and Sundays to recovery—or self-care, as we call it: I foam-rolled, pretzeled my limbs in candlelit yoga, read novels in bed, splurged on $11 smoothies, slathered my skin and hair in masks…you know, the works. Yet even on my most Zen days, nothing came close to the perfect peace I felt after pushing my body to a point it had never been. At first, the fitness editor in me chalked up the bliss to endorphins. But as I melted into the massage table at Connecticut’s serene Mayflower […]

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Special education teacher’s “mental health check in” for students inspires other educators

BY CAITLIN O’KANE APRIL 5, 2019 / 12:00 PM / CBS NEWS A special education teacher from Fremont, California, made a “mental health checklist” for her students. Now, teachers around the world are doing the same.  Erin Castillo posted a photo of her mental health poster on Instagram and it went viral. She made a version of it available to download for free, and teachers around the world are posting photos of the chart in their classrooms. The mental heath checklist asks kids if they are “great,” “okay,” “meh,” “struggling,” “having a hard time” or “in a really dark place.” Students are encouraged to write their names on the back of a post-it and stick it on the poster under the section describing how they’re feeling.  If they put their post-it in the “struggling” section, they know they should try speaking with an adult about their feelings. If they say they are “having a hard time,” or “in a really dark place,” Castillo checks in with them.  The teacher knows it’s important to take time and focus on mental health – especially for high school kids.  “My heart hurts for them,” Castillo wrote on Instagram. “High school is rough sometimes, but I was happy that a few were given a safe space to vent and work through some feelings.” Castillo teaches high school English to special education students, as well as a peer counseling class to general education students, she told CBS News. Her […]

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Clear the toxins from your life-Avoid these ingredients

People Magazine April 22, 2019 Three ingredients to avoid According to Nneka Leiba, Director of Environmental Working Group’s healthy-living science program. Parabens Often used as a preservative in cosmetics and personal-care products, the ingredient is believed to mimic estrogen and potentially cause hormone disruption. Formaldehyde Found in some nail polishes and hair smoothing treatments, it can lead to myriad skin irritations and was deemed carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Phthalates Commonly used as a solvent in the fragrances that scent aftershave, lotion, soap and more, the chemical has been linked to reproduction issues in men.

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