Why Joker’s depiction of mental illness is dangerously misinformed

Annabel Driscoll and Mina Husain The Guardian Mon 21 Oct 2019 11.04 EDT With films playing a key role in shaping attitudes to mental health, two doctors say Joaquin Phoenix’s troubled supervillain perpetuates damaging stereotypes As junior doctors who work on acute inpatient psychiatric wards, serious mental illness is our daily reality. We have, therefore, watched the controversies around Todd Phillips’s Joker – in which Joaquin Phoenix plays a troubled loner who turns to violence – with professional interest. The film’s dominance in the debate about portrayals of mental illness in the movies comes at a curious time. Recently, we’ve witnessed great leaps of awareness about relatively common mental-health issues such as depression and anxiety, and with that awareness, increasing dismissal of the sort of unhelpful prejudices that used to surround them. These are now readily discussed without shame and often represented in the media with a well-informed grasp of the facts, thanks to effective information campaigns. Joker review – the most disappointing film of the year 2 out of 5 stars.     Read more However, severe mental health conditions, such as psychotic illnesses, remain shrouded in stigma and are consistently misrepresented and misunderstood. Portrayals of mental illness in film can perpetuate unfounded stereotypes and spread misinformation. One of the more toxic ideas that Joker subscribes to is the hackneyed association between serious mental illness and extreme violence. The notion that mental deterioration necessarily leads to violence against others – implied by the juxtaposition of Phoenix’s character Arthur stopping […]

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Treating Lyme with Marty Ross MD-Probiotics

Dear Subscriber, Most people with Lyme disease should take probiotics while they are in treatment. However, not all probiotics are created equal. And there are different types of probiotics for different situations. In Probiotics in Lyme Treatment I explain the different kinds of probiotics. Preventing yeast requires a different probiotic strategy than treating active yeast infection. Some on antibiotics may also develop an intestinal infection problem called C. Difficile. In Probiotics in Lyme Treatment I show you which probiotic products to use for each of these situations and describe how to dose them. In Health, Marty Ross MD  Read Now Spread the Word!   ShareTweetForward Quality Matters. See the various probiotic products I use successfully in my practice at Marty Ross MD Healing Arts.  Look Now

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U.S. PAIN FOUNDATION SUBMITS COMMENTS TO CMS RFI

October 16, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation/ 0 Comments October 11, 2019 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Comments on the Request for Information (RFI) on the Development of a CMS Action Plan to Prevent Opioid Addiction and Enhance Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment The U.S. Pain Foundation is pleased to respond to CMS’s request for information to inform the development of a CMS Action plan to prevent opioid addiction and improve the treatment of acute and chronic pain. The U.S. Pain Foundation is the largest 501 (c) (3) organization for people who live with chronic pain from a myriad of diseases, conditions and serious injuries. Our mission is to connect, support, educate and advocate for those living with chronic pain, as well as their caregivers and healthcare providers. Chronic pain is an enormous public health problem. The CDC and NIH have reported that 50 million Americans live with chronic pain and 19.6 million live with high-impact chronic pain that interferes with their ability to 1 There are currently very few highly effective treatments for many pain conditions. Managing pain is a matter of finding the right combination of treatments that allows pain sufferers to function and have some quality of life. We believe people with chronic pain should have access to a wide range of therapies and treatments because pain is very individual – what helps one person living with pain will not necessarily help another.Most people living with chronic pain spend […]

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INTERIM CEO A KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT AMERICAN MASSAGE THERAPY ASSOCIATION CONVENTION

October 31, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation/ 0 Comments Interim CEO Nicole Hemmenway was one of three keynote speakers at the closing session of the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) national convention last weekend in Indianapolis, IN. In her talk, “Massage for Chronic Pain: What our community wants you to know,” Hemmenway shared her personal journey with complex regional pain syndrome and why she’s dedicated herself to helping others with pain through the U.S. Pain Foundation. She gave attendees a glimpse into the programs and services U.S. Pain offers, and provided insight into the scope of the chronic pain health crisis in America. The emphasis of Hemmenway’s remarks was on the barriers to multidisciplinary care, particularly massage, and how massage therapists can best help people with pain. “It truly was a privilege to be invited by the AMTA to speak at their annual convention,” Hemmenway says. “There is a greater need, maybe now more than ever, for affordable access to multidisciplinary care, such as massage therapy. I was so impressed with the therapists I spoke to who are genuinely invested in patient’s overall wellness. But like the pain community, they also feel discouraged by the lack of access. That is why it is so important for us to use our voices to fight for better coverage of options like massage.” Hemmenway shared feedback from the pain community about what they wanted massage therapists to know, including: People with pain have bodies that are […]

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The hidden abuse that can hurt your mental health: Gaslighting

Nearly half the women and men in the U.S. say they’ve endured psychological aggression from intimate partners. OCT. 4, 201903:45Oct. 4, 2019, 6:22 AM CDTBy Bianca Seidman Domestic abuse is a leading problem in American homes and it can take many different forms. When the abuse leaves no physical marks, outsiders may not recognize when all is not well and the abused person can find it challenging to translate what’s happening. “Gaslighting” — a term that became popular after the 1944 movie “Gaslight,” in which a husband slowly makes his wife think she’s going crazy through a long game of deceptions — is an insidious form of psychological abuse. It’s an intricate web of lies woven to break down one partner’s sense of self-worth and perception of what is real. “When you’re black and blue, you can point to the bruises and you can say ‘This happened to me,’” Dr. Robin Stern, associate director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, told TODAY. “But when somebody is undermining your reality and you simply have this feeling that there’s something wrong … women moreso than men, but men too, tend to point their fingers at themselves and say, ‘I did something wrong.’” Nearly half of all women and men in the U.S. said they’ve been subjected to psychological aggression by an intimate partner, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How couples can spot warning signs of domestic abuse OCT. 3, 201906:42 […]

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How To Care For Yourself When Dealing With Difficult People

By Dana BelletiereLast updated: 3 Oct 2019~ One of my friends tells her story of growing up with a mother with “issues” rather matter-of-factly, but the details are pretty grim to listen to. “She would stop talking to me for no reason, for days at a time, and put a gift on my bed when she decided she was done being mad at me. We never talked about why she was angry, and most of the time I didn’t know. I just knew not to talk to her until she left something on my bed, and then I’d hold my breath until the next time she got upset about something.”  My friend’s mother sometimes disappeared for lengths of time without anyone knowing where she went or when (or if) she would return. When she fought with my friend’s father, she frequently brought my friend into the arguments as a mediator, despite her being a child. “Everything was about her,” my friend says. “Even as an adult, forty years later, everything is still about her.” Whether we are born into families with difficult people, or enter into relationships with them as friends, coworkers, partners, etcetera, it can be challenge to know how to best respond to someone who is emotionally unwell. In order to do so effectively, it is paramount that we understand that the behaviors that are being presented are not our fault, develop firm and clear boundaries about what we will and will […]

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Gluten-Free Salmon with Lime and Sesame Seeds Great for Holidays

Gluten-Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD with Susie Flaherty   Ingredients: 1 1/2 to 2 pounds salmon (wild-caught preferred with skin on) Juice from 2-3 limes Olive Oil Sesame Seeds Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and coat very lightly with olive oil. Place salmon, skin side down, on parchment paper in the pan. Squees the juice of 2-3 limes into a bowl. Use a pastry brush to coat salmon with lime juice. Coat the top of the salmon with sesame seeds. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. Be careful to not overcook.  

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#Art Through Pain #KNOWvember

Dear pain warriors,Each November, U.S. Pain Foundation organizes a month-long educational campaign for the pain community. Recognizing that art and writing can help kids and adults cope with and/or express chronic pain and its effects on their lives, this year’s KNOWvember campaign will focus on creativity.During the month, titled “Art through Pain: How Creativity Helps Us Cope,” U.S. Pain will be:hosting three virtual events, soliciting visual art submissions to showcase at a later date,and highlighting information about art and pain on social media (#ArtThroughPain).If you’d like to submit your artwork, you have the option of sharing it with us privately or allowing us to use it in a future project (such as in a blog post on Remedy or an INvisible Project magazine) through the link below. Submit your artwork >>

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Agoraphobia, Dreams, Trauma and EMDR

In post https://lookingforthelight.blog/2019/07/22/agoraphobia-is-not-logical/ ,‎ I forgot to mention the nightmares that have haunted me and I believe reinforce my agoraphobia. Every dream is based on not being able to get out or leave where I am. Examples, can’t find keys, don’t know what exit to take from store, cars covered in snow, not sure which one is mine. I also dream I’m flying, which I have for a long time, new to my dreams are not being able to see or only seeing a small amount. I’m not real deep into dream interpretation but from what I’ve read the deffinitions could fit. Flying is generally a good sign however it could mean you are fleeing something. Being blind is not wanting to see or face what is before you. I can’t help but think these dreams are aggrevating my agroraphobia and anxiety. Saturday I woke up and during the dream I could not find my car because it was snowed under, then I was flying in a part of town that is an hour away from where I live yet I was trying to get home. Next in the dream I’m in an expensive business suit and enter an auditorium, I’m nervious someone will think I have money and try to rob me so I’m shoving my purse into my breifcase. Then I find and pay phone and fumble for change and someone is standing in my way and won’t move […]

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Here’s the truth about CBD, from a cannabis researcher

IDEAS.TED.COM Sep 23, 2019 / Jeffrey Chen, MD Is CBD a cure-all — or snake oil? Jeffrey Chen, executive director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, explains the science behind the cannabis product. CBD gummies. CBD shots in your latte. CBD dog biscuits. From spas to drug stores, supermarkets to cafes, wherever you go in the US today, you’re likely to see products infused with CBD. There are cosmetics, vape pens, pills and, of course, the extract itself; there are even CBD-containing sexual lubricants for women which aim to reduce pelvic pain or enhance sensation. CBD has been hailed by some users as having cured their pain, anxiety, insomnia, depression or seizures, and it’s been touted by advertisers as a supplement that can treat all of the above and combat aging and chronic disease. As Executive Director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, I’m dedicated to unearthing the scientific truth — the good and the bad — behind cannabis and CBD. My interest was sparked in 2014 when I was a medical student at UCLA, and I discovered a parent successfully treating her child’s severe epilepsy with CBD. I was surprised and intrigued. Despite California legalizing medical cannabis in 1996, we weren’t taught anything about cannabis or CBD in med school. I did research and found other families and children like Charlotte Figi reporting success with CBD, and I knew it was something that needed to be investigated. I established Cannabis Research Initiative in the fall of 2017, and today we […]

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Why PTSD Is a Mental Injury, Not a Mental Illness

Psychology Today Posted Sep 23, 2019 Tracy S. Hutchinson, Ph.D. New research suggests that PTSD is a normal response to common life events.   According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 7.7 million adults suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Along with a surge of awareness regarding PTSD, there are also many misconceptions. For example, some believe it is only associated with war veterans, events such as 9/11, or natural disasters. Although this diagnosis has historically been associated with military veterans who undergo multiple deployments, there are many other events that can trigger symptoms of PTSD. For example, prolonged exposure to emotional and psychological abuse (e.g., verbally abusive relationships, alcoholism, or stressful childhoods) are risk factors for developing symptoms. Some of these lingering misconceptions may be due to the fact that development and recognition of the disorder is relatively recent and has really only blossomed in the last three decades. History In 1980, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) formally recognized PTSD as an actual mental health diagnosis. Historically, it had been formally recognized as “shell shock” and was thought only to occur in military war veterans. Further, PTSD had historically been thought of as something that someone “gets over” over time. This may be true for some, but it isn’t for others. Researchers continue to discover risk factors that can cause PTSD symptoms. This includes emerging research on the study of what happens in childhood and how it affects adults in their lifetime (van Der Kolk, 2014). For example, some of my clients […]

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You Left Your Job Because of Sexual Harassment. What Now?

OCT 04, 2019 Some victims of workplace sexual harassment are reluctant to report what happened because they fear the effect on their career. For those who leave their job after experiencing harassment or assault, it can be hard to know how to approach a new job search, application, or interview process. “It’s a challenging issue. It’s a difficult scenario that more and more people are being placed in. The main thing is to remember you’re not to blame and this situation doesn’t define you,” says Pete Church, a member of RAINN’s National Leadership Council and Chief Human Resources Officer at Avangrid, a leading sustainable energy company that operates in 24 states. What to do during your search  “If your goal is to assess how a potential employer understands and addresses harassment in the work environment, then there’s a lot of helpful research you can do before you’re in an interview,” Church suggests. He also recommends going on Glassdoor and reading reviews of the company. Even if you don’t see specific mentions of sexual harassment in the reviews, you can learn about the company culture. It can also be helpful to find past employees of a company you’re interested in on LinkedIn. You can reach out for a networking phone call to ask about what their experience was like, about the company culture, and if you feel comfortable doing so, why they left the organization. Approach the situation optimistically and know […]

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The bias of mental illness — Guest Blogger Shedding Light on Mental Health

When I ask a group of participants to think of all the words associated with someone who has mental illness here’s what I get: crazy, looney, nuts, attention seeking, dangerous, violent, etc. Then I ask the question what are words you hear about a cancer survivor. Those words are: hero, warrior, brave, strong, etc. Then […] The bias of mental illness — Shedding Light on Mental Health

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Keep Speaking Out About Pain

Keep speaking out.My personal path into patient advocacy began with speaking at conferences about my struggle with complex regional pain syndrome, and, then, writing a book about it. But I know first-hand that speaking up isn’t easy–it can leave you feeling vulnerable and exposed, and it requires your already-limited energy and time. That’s why I’m so grateful to each pain warrior […]

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Lyme Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond

 Dear Subscriber, There are a number of things that can block your recovery from Lyme disease. If you have been on antibiotics for six to nine months and you are not getting better, there are additional steps to take. In Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond I describe how to move your treatment forward. In my Seattle practice, I discovered ways to move the treatments forward of my patients. In Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond I describe my formula. Read and watch this article to see if effective treatments are right for you. In Health, Marty Ross MD Read or Watch NowSpread the Word!  ShareTweetForwardQuality Matters. You can find the various supplements I use effectively in my Seattle practice at Marty Ross MD Supplements. Look Now

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What are Glutens and how to start a Gluten-Free Lifestyle

It’s important to understand what glutens are and where to look for in order to establish a gluten-free lifestyle. As more people are diagnosed gluten intolerant more pre-made products will become available making choices much easier. I plan to write a number of post on the Gluten-Free lifestyle in the coming months. Below is a short list of items and ingredients you can eat. The Information is taken from Gluten Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD. Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School.  Melinda Gluten is found in common foods such as breads, cereals, baked goods, and pasta. Because it’s used in processed foods as an additive or preservative, gluten is also found in a wide variety of foods and nonfood items from prescription medications to Play-Doh. If you are the food shopper in the family, you must learn to read labels very carefully to comply with gluten-free diet. Things you can eat on the Gluten-Free Diet Gluten-Free Grains, Flours, Seeds and Starches Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Cassava Corn Flaxseed Nut Flours Millet Montina Gluten-Free Oats Quinoa Rice Sago Sorghum Tapioca Teff Wild rice Safe Ingredients List  Vinegar except malt vinegar  Distilled alcohol Carmel color Citric acid Spices Monosodium glutamate Maltodextrin Mono- and diglycerides Artificial flavor and color Natural flavor and color 

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Gluten-Free Basic Salad Dressing and Salads

From Mary Frances McFadden, Jackson Township, New Jersey Basic Salad Dressing Ingredients: 1/2 cup water 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar or white vinegar 1 teaspoon white sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt Pinch of black pepper 1 teaspoon celery seed Fresh herbs of your choice (parsley, rosemary, thyme, dill or other) Cucumber Salad Peel one or two cucumbers and slice into rounds. […]

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Remembering Mom Part 3 – How to Help Your Dementia Loved One — Guest Blogger Hindsight: My Journey

Realizing your parent or any loved one may have dementia is a tough one. I live with the regretful feeling that I should have recognized it sooner. At the time I was absorbed with my own life drama, but that’s no excuse. My hope is that what I learned as a daughter, observer and eventual […] Remembering Mom Part 3 – How to Help Your Dementia Loved One — Hindsight: My Journey

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Billie Eilish opens up about mental health: ‘I didn’t think that I would even make it’ to 17

Charles Trepany, USA TODAYPublished 10:22 a.m. ET Sept. 5, 2019 Billie Eilish is getting real on her mental health. The “Bury a Friend” songstress confessed in her cover story for Elle magazine that, despite early career success, she hasn’t always been happy.  “Two years ago, I felt like nothing mattered; every single thing was pointless,” she said in the article published Thursday. “Not just in my life, but everything in the whole world. I was fully clinically depressed. It’s insane to look back and not be anymore.” Eilish has been accused by trolls of faking her depression, which she admitted have been painful to read. “It hurt me to see that,” she said. “I was a 16-year-old girl who was really unstable. I’m in the happiest place of my life, and I didn’t think that I would even make it to this age.” More: Billie Eilish, 17, rips Nylon Germany for topless cover: I ‘did not consent in any way’ The 17-year-old said her mental health has since improved, calling happiness a “crazy” feeling. “I haven’t been happy for years,” she said. “I didn’t think I would be happy again. And here I am—I’ve gotten to a point where I’m finally okay. It’s not because I’m famous. It’s not because I have a little more money. It’s so many different things: growing up, people coming into your life, certain people leaving your life.” More: Believe the hype: Billie Eilish proves she’s a once-in-a-generation talent at NYC concert The singer added […]

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We Don’t Talk Much About Debt and Depression. This Blogger Is Changing That

Melanie Lockert remembers checking the traffic for her blog, Dear Debt, and feeling shocked at the results. Someone had found her site by searching, “I want to kill myself because of debt.” Lockert started Dear Debt in January 2013 after spending the previous year feeling depressed about her student loans. She posted monthly updates about her efforts to pay off […]

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Did Daddy know he was “Crazy”

My father committed suicide in 1992, put a shot-gun in his mouth. I was 28 years old, we were estranged since I was a teen. A trigger hit me like a hurricane this week. I’m having memories, not the worst. You put the the pressure on my shoulders to arrange everything, who to call. I had to face the chore of the house, a man living out of touch for many years. Worst was going to morgue, hand me original note and his bloody shotgun. Could you not see your friends were different? They were thieves but not in the same universe. They all took advantage of you, move in move out and steal what they want. One roommate committed suicide with your gun in your house. Down on their luck, will make payments on car, he was lucky to get three payments. He would have to track down and repo the car. They would come back begging and he would do it again. His friends were people at the bar he parked cars at. All the ladies got special attention, my father walked the lot to make sure the cars were secure. They all flirted with him, fake flirting, trashy bar, easy women going to bar in the hood looking for love. One night feeling the black dog, I went to the bar where my father parked cars. We played a game of pool, sitting at the bar he […]

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Christa’s Story

RAINN.ORG Christa is a Survivor of Sexual Assault, her story is hard to read and yet she comes out on top. She was able to more forward and rebuild her life. She has the strength like many of you.   “When you speak with a survivor of sexual assault, imagine that they are a loved one who has gone through […]

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Camila Cabello just shared the simple self-help technique she uses to overcome her anxiety

People Posted byChristobel Hastings Published16 days ago Camila Cabello is no stranger to speaking out about her mental healthstruggles, and in a bid to raise awareness of the effects of anxiety, the singer shared the self-help technique she turns to when she’s feeling overwhelmed by the chaos of everyday life. In an age when our perception of the world is so often viewed through a heavily filtered lens, it can be tough to keep a cultivate a positive self-image. But despite the heavily-filtered images and aspirational messages we consume on our social media feeds, more and more celebrities are taking steps to break through the illusion of perfection and present a more nuanced reality. One star leading the way when it comes to disrupting the narrative is Camila Cabello. The singer is no stranger to speaking out about her struggles with mental health, and in a candid note to her followers last month, she opened up about her experiences with anxiety, and the ways she’s learned to cope with being “incredibly nervous” and “socially anxious.” This time around the Señorita singer is continuing her mental health conversation by sharing the coping mechanism she turns to when she’s feeling overwhelmed: breathing exercises. Taking to Instagram, the singer posted a long note to her followers acknowledging that she has the power to influence positive change in people’s lives through her social media platform, even if in “small ways.” “To anyone on here who is struggling, which we all do […]

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Let’s Talk About Pain

Dear pain warriors, At U.S. Pain Foundation, we deeply believe in the power of sharing patient stories. Talking about our experiences with pain helps us to educate others, to create change, and to offer hope. That’s why our theme for Pain Awareness Month 2019, which begins Sunday, is #LetsTalkAboutPain.I first got involved in patient advocacy by writing a book about my experiences with complex regional pain syndrome. It enabled me to process my personal journey, take control of my story, and help create awareness for those like me. I hope speaking up about pain this September can do the same for you. This year, we have dozens of opportunities for you to help bring pain to the forefront of public conversations, ranging from our daily storyathon to social media giveaways to weekly events.All of these activities are presented in collaboration with our generous sponsor, Thrive Tape, the creator of an innovative, far-infrared kinesiology tape for all types of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. (We encourage you to check them out! Use the code USPAIN for a discount.)How you can participateWe have something for everyone! Most activities are online, which means you can take part from the comfort of your home. Storyathon. Each day in September, U.S. Pain will be sharing a video story of a real person living with pain. These individuals–from all walks of life–bravely submitted their personal stories in August to help create awareness. To watch the videos, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Missed the video storyathon deadline? Share […]

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The Simple Guide to Value Triggers

Psychology Today   How to live by your highest ideals. Posted Aug 11, 2019 Steven C. Hayes Ph.D. Get Out of Your Mind Source: Pixabay/CC Being in touch with your values is essential to living a rich and meaningful life. By knowing what you care about most, you become inspired to live by your highest ideals, bringing out the best in yourself. In short, values help you find direction, meaning, and inspiration in life. Unfortunately, however, it’s more complicated than this. Because too often enough, we get sidetracked. Too often, the demands of the day pull our attention away from what really matters, to serve our immediate emotional needs. We then lose touch of our ideals, and revert back to old – often destructive – habits. If you wish to stop this from happening, break the cycle of bad habits, and bring forth the best of yourself, you have to reconnect with your values whenever you lose touch. And the easiest way to accomplish this, are value triggers. What Are Value Triggers? A value trigger is a physical reminder of your core values. By merely looking at it, you refocus back on what matters most, making you act more in line with your highest ideals. The trigger can be almost anything, as long as it makes you remember your values. Here are a few ideas: Card in Wallet. Write down a few core values on an index card, and put it in your […]

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My Lyme Data Chart Book

How many participants in the MyLymeData patient registry ever had a Lyme-related rash? (34%) How many initially presented with flu-like symptoms? (64%) How many were misdiagnosed with a psychiatric illness? (54%) These are some of the details you can learn in the MyLymeData 2019 Chart Book. This report is a compilation of our research results based on more than 2.5 […]

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23andMe Explores Dietary Habit and Health Outcomes

August 6, 2019 By 23andMe under 23andMe Research By Rafaela Bagur Quetglas, PhD You are what you eat, is the old adage, but what does your diet actually say about you?  23andMe has a unique opportunity to explore that question, as we investigate how dietary habits, along with genetics, demographics, lifestyle and other data can influence overall health outcomes. Looking at diet specifically, our scientists analyzed the data of more than 850,000 people who consented to participate in research and who shared details about their own eating habits.  Using machine learning techniques* we were able to see that dietary choices clustered into four distinct types of eaters, which were mainly characterized by two dietary behaviors. The first one represents the spectrum of foods’ nutrient content from high nutrient-dense foods (i.e. low caloric foods with high nutrient content like vegetables, leafy greens, fruit, beans or whole-grains) to low nutrient-dense foods (i.e. high caloric foods with low nutrient content like. processed foods, sweets, sodas, pastries, saturated fats or  fast food). The second main behavior differentiating diet groups is the meat intake, in particular, red and processed meat (e.g., sausages, hot dogs, ham, or cured bacon).   Dietary Types Using these two behaviors as axes, we can plot the four main diet groups:  On one end, we find people who eat high nutrient-dense (HND) foods like  vegetables, leafy greens and fruits and tend to avoid high caloric foods with low nutrient content like refined carbs, processed foods, saturated […]

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Natural Seasonal Allergy Relief

Willow & Sage by Stampington By Kaetlyn Kennedy   Nettle Leaf Tea Made from stinging nettle plants, organic nettle tea can help relieve seasonal allergy symptoms with it’s natural antihistamine. You reap all the benefits of antihistamine symptom relief without having to take conventional medicines. You can drink the daily as a preventative or as needed.   Spirulina & Other […]

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Bring Change to Mind Partners with Mental Health for US

 Bring Change to Mind is excited to announce that we have partnered with Mental Health for US, a nonpartisan educational initiative focused on elevating mental health and addiction in policy conversations by empowering grassroots advocates and improving candidate and policymaker health literacy. The initiative is powered by a coalition of stakeholder groups from around the country dedicated to uniting the American people to make systemic, long-term change with civic engagement tools and resources.  The movement launched at The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s 10th Annual Advocacy Forum by former U.S. Representative and co-chair of the Mental Health for US initiative Patrick J. Kennedy (D-R.I.). Former U.S. Senator Gordon H. Smith (R-OR), a long-time mental health advocate, will also serve as co-chair. “The suicide rate has skyrocketed over the past 20 years because mental health and substance use disorders often go undetected and undertreated,” said Sen. Smith. “Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in America. Now more than ever, we need our government leaders to stand up and champion systemic change. We have to make our voices heard.”  Join us in building this movement of change!   Learn More About Mental Health for Us 

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What are Glutens and how to start a Gluten-Free Lifestyle

It’s important to understand what glutens are and where to look for in order to establish a gluten-free lifestyle. As more people are diagnosed gluten intolerant more pre-made products will become available making choices much easier. I plan to write a number of post on the Gluten-Free lifestyle in the coming months. Below is a short list of items and ingredients you can eat. The Information is taken from Gluten Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD. Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School.  Melinda Gluten is found in common foods such as breads, cereals, baked goods, and pasta. Because it’s used in processed foods as an additive or preservative, gluten is also found in a wide variety of foods and nonfood items from prescription medications to Play-Doh. If you are the food shopper in the family, you must learn to read labels very carefully to comply with gluten-free diet. Things you can eat on the Gluten-Free Diet Gluten-Free Grains, Flours, Seeds and Starches Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Cassava Corn Flaxseed Nut Flours Millet Montina Gluten-Free Oats Quinoa Rice Sago Sorghum Tapioca Teff Wild rice Safe Ingredients List  Vinegar except malt vinegar  Distilled alcohol Carmel color Citric acid Spices Monosodium glutamate Maltodextrin Mono- and diglycerides Artificial flavor and color Natural flavor and color 

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Find Delight in Different Forms of Stillness

“Stillness” can sound sentimental but it’s what most of us long for. Psychology Today Posted Jul 29, 2019  Rick Hanson Ph.D. Your Wise Brain What is your sense of stillness? “Stillness or peace” may sound merely sentimental (“visualize whirled peas”). But deep down, it’s what most of us long for. Consider the proverb: The highest happiness is stillness. Not a stillness or […]

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Prevent unnecessary medical care — by asking your doctor these 4 questions first

TED TALKS Jul 22, 2019 / Daryl Chen Justin Tran By raising questions and taking on a more active role in decision making, patients can do their part to avoid needless medications, tests, treatments or procedures, says neurosurgeon Christer Mjåset. This post is part of TED’s “How to Be a Better Human” series, each of which contains a piece of helpful advice […]

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Mini Me Health Update

My Parathyroid surgery was July 8th and I’m healing nicely. The surgeon found quite a surprise, I had five Parathyroids instead of four. She said it was rare. I hope that translates to feeling all the better. She is getting my calcium levels adjusted and it was painful in the beginning with cramping legs and numb fingers. It’s not what […]

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How Grief Shows Up In Your Body

WEB MD By Stephanie Hairston July 11, 2019 — It’s surprising how physical grief can be. Your heart literally aches. A memory comes up that causes your stomach to clench or a chill to run down your spine. Some nights, your mind races, and your heart races along with it, your body so electrified with energy that you can barely sleep. Other nights, you’re so tired that you fall asleep right away. You wake up the next morning still feeling exhausted and spend most of the day in bed. Amy Davis, a 32-year-old from Bristol, TN, became sick with grief after losing Molly, a close 38-year-old family member, to cancer. “Early grief was intensely physical for me,” Davis says. “After the shock and adrenaline of the first weeks wore off, I went through a couple of months of extreme fatigue, with nausea, headaches, food aversion, mixed-up sleep cycles, dizziness, and sun sensitivity. It was extremely difficult to do anything. … If there’s one thing I want people to know about grief, it’s how awful it can make your body feel.” What causes these physical symptoms? A range of studies reveal the powerful effects grief can have on the body. Grief increases inflammation, which can worsen health problems you already have and cause new ones. It batters the immune system, leaving you depleted and vulnerable to infection. The heartbreak of grief can increase blood pressure and the risk of blood clots. Intense grief can alter the […]

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Agrophobia Is Not Logical

Whatever this obstacle is, it started 18 months ago, there wasn’t a moment I can pin this inability on. Inability is the right word, I’m not afraid to leave the house, I’ve driven a few times in the past year, I know how to drive and live in the same town. Yet I have my husband take me to all […]

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Natural Seasonal Allergy Relief

Willow & Sage by Stampington By Kaetlyn Kennedy   Nettle Leaf Tea Made from stinging nettle plants, organic nettle tea can help relieve seasonal allergy symptoms with it’s natural antihistamine. You reap all the benefits of antihistamine symptom relief without having to take conventional medicines. You can drink the daily as a preventative or as needed.   Spirulina & Other […]

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Dementia Thoughts

Dementia sucks, it’s fucking life sucking. I watched my granny die from Dementia, you don’t wish that type of death on anyone. Once she no longer knew who she or anyone else was it was crushing. I don’t want to die that way and have been vocal about it to the surprise of my husband, Therapist and Psychiatrist. My decision […]

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Why Do Women Get More Migraines than Men?

National Migraine Institute Posted on August 27, 2018 by Staff Researchers have found a potential mechanism for migraine that may explain why women get more migraines than men. The study, in Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, suggests that sex hormones affect cells around the trigeminal nerve and connected blood vessels in the head.  They found that estrogens, which are at their highest levels in women of reproductive age, are particularly important for sensitizing these cells to migraine triggers. “We can observe significant differences in our experimental migraine model between males and females and are trying to understand the molecular correlates responsible for these differences,” explains Professor Antonio Ferrer-Montiel from the Universitas Miguel Hernández, Spain. “Although this is a complex process, we believe that modulation of the trigeminovascular system by sex hormones plays an important role that has not been properly addressed.” Ferrer-Montiel and his team reviewed decades of literature on sex hormones, migraine sensitivity and cells’ responses to migraine triggers to identify the role of specific hormones. Some (like testosterone) seem to protect against migraines, while others (like prolactin) appear to make migraines worse. They do this by making the cells’ ion channels, which control the cells’ reactions to outside stimuli, more or less vulnerable to migraine triggers. Some hormones need much more research to determine their role. Estrogen, however, stands out as a key candidate for understanding migraine occurrence. It was first identified as a factor by the greater prevalence of migraine in menstruating […]

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Caregiver 101 Tips I Missed

Reblogged from 2009 I care for my 92-year-old gramps and have been here five weeks. He had three surgeries in seven days. Without Caregiving 101 training, I learned the hard way. *Ask the doctor what happens if the  procedure does not work. *If a second procedure does not work, is there a third option. *What is the recovery time and type of […]

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Chronic Pain: Swimming Therapy

  Most people don’t think of Mental Illness when discussing Chronic Pain. Mental Illness can be physically debilitating with many spending large amounts of time in bed. For someone like me who is challenged by both, daily life can be difficult. Today I’m in bed juggling my laptop on one knee trying to avoid the pain screaming on the left […]

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Pain Warriors

As Ambassador for U.S. Pain Foundation I want to share the latest news on a meeting offered by U.S. Pain Foundation and Coilition for Headache and Migranes Patients. Melinda Sandor Ambassador-Texas U.S. Pain Foundation. Dear pain warriors, Those with chronic pain, including migraine and headache disorders, can have an especially tough time finding a doctor they click with. Have you ever wanted to find a way to better communicate with your doctor, get the most out of your visits, and maximize your treatment plan?If yes, please join us this Thursday, June 13, at 7 pm ESTfor an intimate conversation between neurologist and headache specialist Abby Chua, DO, and patient advocate Katie Golden. Dr. Chua and Katie will discuss what patients and doctors can learn from one another, and offer tips for interacting.Dr. Chua is a headache specialist at Hartford HealthCare Headache Center in Connecticut. She also is program director of their Headache and Facial Pain Fellowship Program, one of the few such programs in the country. Dr. Chua brings a special level of compassion to her practice as a person living with vestibular migraine, and advocates tirelessly on behalf of patients. Katie lives with chronic migraine disease, and has emerged as a leading voice for the patient community. She is the Migraine Advocacy Liaison for U.S. Pain Foundation and a member of the steering committee for CHAMP. She was the recipient of the Impact Award 2017 for the Association of Migraine Disorders and writes […]

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This NBA Superstar Used 2 (Surprising) Words to Teach a Valuable Lesson in Emotional Intelligence

By Justin BarisoFounder, Insight It’s rare for professional athletes to admit weakness. It’s even rarer for them to do this. As the Toronto Raptors and Golden State Warriors continue their slugfest to determine the NBA’s 2019 champion, one player is already preparing for next season: The Milwaukee Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo. Not that long ago it appeared that Antetokounmpo and the Bucks would be playing the Warriors for this year’s championship. The Bucks had cruised through the playoffs, and were up two games to zero against the Toronto Raptors. But the Raptors went on to win the next four games in a row–a remarkable feat considering the Bucks hadn’t lost three games in a row the entire season. The Raptors managed to defeat the Bucks by tooling their defense to focus on stopping the young team’s star (who’s affectionately known as “the Greek Freak” due to his Athens upbringing and monstrous athletic prowess). In a recent interview with The Athletic, Antetokounmpo acknowledged that Raptors players Kawhi Leonard and Marc Gasol gave him particular trouble. Giannis admitted that now the series is over, “every day in his head,” he continues to see Gasol and Leonard coming at him. Then, Antetokounmpo went on to say something remarkable to his opponents: “Thank you. Thank you, because Gasol and Kawhi made me a better player. I’m not trying to be sarcastic. I’m being honest. They’re going to push me to be better.” “Thank you.” It’s rare for professional athletes to admit weakness or to credit opposing players for […]

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Blair Underwood: Ava Duvernay Made A Grief Counselor Available On The Set Of ‘When They See Us’

HelloBuzz Shamika Sanders, Sr. Entertainment Editor Posted May 31, 2019 Ava Duvernay was just a teenager when five young Black boys, from Harlem, were arrested and convicted for the rape of a white woman in Central Park on the night of April 19, 1989. So when Raymond Santana, one of the “Central Park 5” sent her a wishful tweet about bringing the Central Park 5 story to the screen, “it meant a lot” to her, she revealed to NPR. Ava and Netflix’s When They See Us chronicles the events of the Central Park Five case that captivated the nation. The four-part series will span 25 years, taking on the wrongful conviction of the boys, as well as highlight their exoneration in 2002 and the settlement reached with the city of New York in 2014. Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam, Raymond Santana, Jr., Kevin Richardson and Korey Wise were beaten upon arrest, forced into making false confessions and convicted of a crime they did not commit. They served between seven and 13 years in prison and were later exonerated only to have a convicted murderer, who was serving a life sentence, eventually confess to the crime. Their story is perfectly aligned with Duvernay’s mission to raise awareness around the injustices of the prison industrial system, which she explored in her critically acclaimed documentary the 13th. When They See Us stars a stellar cast Michael K. Williams, John Leguizamo, Niecy Nash and Blair Underwood, who opened up to us about this role […]

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23andMe Scientist to Present Data on the Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes at American Diabetes Association Conference

June 3, 2019 By 23andMe under 23andMe Research, Education By Eloycsia Ratliff, MPH, 23andMe Medical Education Project Manager We know that diet and exercise play an important role in a person’s likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, but what role does genetics play? That’s a question 23andMe researchers have been investigating, and at a meeting of the American Diabetes Associations (ADA) Annual Conference on June […]

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Maisie Williams on how ‘Game of Thrones’ stardom impacted on her mental health

Nick Reilly May 16, 2019 10:13 am BST Read more at https://www.nme.com/news/tv/maisie-williams-says-game-of-thrones-stardom-affected-her-mental-health-2488647#ZzzRIZF429jpTWLX.99 “You can just sit in a hole of sadness” Game of Thrones actress Maisie Williams has explained how finding fame on the hit show adversely affected her mental health. The actress, who has drawn widespread acclaim for her portrayal of Arya Stark, told Fearne Cotton’s Happy Place podcast how it was tricky to navigate fame as a teenager. The star was just 13-years-old when she was cast in the role and said that she often became overwhelmed by negative comments on social media. “It gets to a point where you’re almost craving something negative, so you can just sit in a hole of sadness,” Williams said. While Williams now gives less attention to negative thoughts, she admits that she still considers how they affected her. Maisie Williams as Arya Stark ” I still lie in bed at, like, 11 o’clock at night telling myself all the things I hate about myself,” Williams said. “It’s just really terrifying that you’re ever going to slip back into it. That’s still something that I’m really working on, because I think that’s really hard. It’s really hard to feel sad and not feel completely defeated by it.” Describing her desire for a “normal life” after the show ends on Sunday, Williams admitted: “I don’t want any of this crazy, crazy world because it’s not worth it.” READ MORE: ‘Game of Thrones’ season 8 episode 5 review: Did Daenerys just jump […]

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America’s Mental Health Crisis-Bring Change to Mind

Bring Change To Mind Washington Post Live     Last week, our Co-Founder Glenn Close spent the day on Capitol Hill at the invitation of U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) to advocate for Stabenow’s Excellence in Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Expansion Act.This legislation would renew and expand funding for clinics that provide a comprehensive set of mental health and addiction treatment services. Glenn started the day with a Washington Post Live event on mental health and the addiction crisis and participated in a number of meetings with House and Senate leaders throughout the rest of the day.Photo: BC2M Co-Founder Glenn Close, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (R-MO), and U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI).  Learn More

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Fibromyalgia Thoughts #2

The pain has moved to my lower body, it attacks every joint and muscle I have. For the past 10 days, my leg has caused a big problem, it’s hard to walk. Any pressure on my leg makes me scream out in pain. I can’t stand up by myself unless there are objects strong enough to pull me up. My husband isn’t a little guy and it takes two or three tries because I start to cry out. I have no idea what is happening, this level of pain is new for me. It’s not so much the level but the time in constant pain. I’ve been going to bed between 4:30-6:30 p.m. every night thinking resting is the only answer. So far that seems to be the case. I can now move my knee closer to a normal sitting position. Try getting on and off the toilet, it’s been a painful 10 days. I’ve forced myself to bed in order to get better. I’m not looking for total pain relief, that’s not my goal. Right now I want to be able to get out of a chair by myself. The rest of my body feels the normal everyday dull pain, my shoulder still screams out at night. Pain meds, topical patches and ointments the doctor gave me on Friday have provided no relief. I’m laying in bed with one leg balancing the computer, trying not to walk any more than […]

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What Are Parabens—and Do I Need to Worry About Them?

Real Simple By Eleni N. Gage Updated: October 12, 2017   These preservatives are common, but health concerns have cropped up.  Parabens have been widely used in products to prevent bacteria growth since the 1950s. “About 85 percent of cosmetics have them,” says Arthur Rich, Ph.D., a cosmetic chemist in Chestnut Ridge, New York. “They’re inexpensive and effective.” New York City dermatologist […]

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For Kids With Anxiety, Parents Learn To Let Them Face Their Fears

April 15, 20195:00 AM ETHeard on  Morning Edition ANGUS CHEN The first time Jessica Calise can remember her 9-year-old son Joseph’s anxiety spiking was about a year ago, when he had to perform at a school concert. He said his stomach hurt and he might throw up. “We spent the whole performance in the bathroom,” she recalls. After that, Joseph struggled whenever he had to do something alone, like showering or sleeping in his bedroom. He would beg his parents to sit outside the bathroom door or let him sleep in their bed. “It’s heartbreaking to see your child so upset and feel like he’s going to throw up because he’s nervous about something that, in my mind, is no big deal,” Jessica says. Jessica decided to enroll in an experimental program, one that was very different from other therapy for childhood anxiety that she knew about. It wasn’t Joseph who would be seeing a therapist every week — it would be her. The program was part of a Yale University study that treated children’s anxiety by teaching their parents new ways of responding to it. “The parent’s own responses are a core and integral part of childhood anxiety,” says Eli Lebowitz, a psychologist at the Yale School of Medicine who developed the training. For instance, when Joseph would get scared about sleeping alone, Jessica and her husband, Chris Calise, did what he asked and comforted him. “In my mind, I was […]

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Prince Harry and Oprah Winfrey are joining forces on a new documentary series about mental health and well-being.

by Imogen Calderwood  April 16, 2019 The pair will be co-creators and executive producers of the series, according to an announcement on Wednesday from Kensington Palace via Harry and Meghan’s new Instagram account, SussexRoyal.  The multi-part series is due to be broadcast next year on the recently announced US streaming service, Apple TV+, which will launch this autumn. It’s not yet known, however, how viewers in the UK will be able to watch.  According to the statement, the show will “focus on both mental illness and mental wellness, inspiring viewers to have an honest conversation about the challenges each of us faces, and how to equip ourselves with the tools to not simply survive, but to thrive.”  The palace said the series would build on the Duke of Sussex’s extensive work on mental health.   Instagram Harry has previously spoken out about the “quite serious effect” the death of his mother, Princess Diana, had on his life, and said that he has “probably been very close to a complete breakdown on numerous occasions.”  “I truly believe that good mental health — mental fitness — is the key to powerful leadership, productive communities, and a purpose-driven self,” said Harry, in a statement about the documentary.  He also revealed that he feels the “huge responsibility to get this right as we bring you the facts, the science, and the awareness of a subject that is so relevant during these times.” “Our hope is that this series will be positive, enlightening, and inclusive — […]

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PAIN COMMUNITY UNITES TO RESPOND TO FEDERAL DRAFT REPORT

May 1, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation The 90-day public comment period for the Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force’s (PMTF) draft report came to a close April 1, with more than 6,000 individuals and organizations submitting feedback. Among those to comment was the Consumer Pain Advocacy Task Force (CPATF), a coalition of pain patient-related nonprofits, including U.S. Pain Foundation, which submitted a 25-page joint letter. In addition to U.S. Pain Foundation, the CPATF letter was signed by the Center for Practical Bioethics; CHAMP (Coalition For Headache And Migraine Patients); Chronic Pain Research Alliance; For Grace: Women In Pain; Global Healthy Living Foundation; Headache and Migraine Policy Forum; International Pain Foundation; Interstitial Cystitis Association; RSDSA (Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association); and The Pain Community. “We are very grateful that so many patient organizations joined together to respond to this report with one, unified voice,” says Cindy Steinberg, U.S. Pain Foundation’s National Director of Policy and Advocacy and the only patient advocacy representative on the PMTF. “While the draft report holds a lot of promise, from the patient perspective, we had a number of important suggestions for ways to improve or expand on its recommendations.” Of note, the CPATF letter commends the draft report’s emphasis on individualized care and encouraged further emphasis of that point. CPATF also urges PMTF to go further and recommend that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) formally revise and reissue their 2016 guidelines on opioid prescribing […]

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CLEARING UP 12 COMMON MYTHS ABOUT MEDICAL CANNABIS FOR PAIN

April 18, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation   Ellen Lenox Smith is Co-Director of Medical Cannabis for U.S. Pain and a U.S. Pain Board Member. She lives with two rare conditions: Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and sarcoidosis. After years of struggling to find pain relief without side effects or adverse reactions, she discovered medical cannabis. A retired school teacher, Ellen is now a renowned patient advocate and works tirelessly to encourage safe, fair access to all treatment options, particularly medical cannabis. She has spoken at numerous conferences on cannabis access and been featured widely in the media on the topic. She is also the author of two books: It Hurts Like Hell!: I Live With Pain—And Have A Good Life Anyway and My Life as a Service Dog. Below, she clears up common myths surrounding medical cannabis for pain. MYTH #1: ALL  PEOPLE WHO USE CANNABIS MUST BE “STONED” OR “HIGH.” Truth: this only happens if you use too much medication. People living with pain get pain relief; people using it socially and not in pain, get high! In addition, medical cannabis is made of two components: THC, which causes the mental effects associated with feeling high, and CBD, which produces bodily effects. Various strains of cannabis have different ratios of THC and CBD, which means that not all strains create as much of a “high” feeling. MYTH #2: EVERYONE WHO USES THE SAME STRAIN EXPERIENCES THE SAME RESULT TO USING IT. Truth: Each body can have […]

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PAIN CONNECTION ADDS FOUR SUPPORT GROUPS AND NEW MONTHLY CALL

May 1, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation   Finding community support is essential to living with chronic pain. With that in mind, Pain Connection, a program of U.S. Pain Foundation, continues to expand its in-person and conference call support group offerings nationwide. Along with three existing monthly “Pain Connection Live” support group calls, there will now be a morning call on the third Thursday of each month from 10-11 am EST. The first call will be May 16. Existing calls are held on one evening, one afternoon, and one Saturday each month. To learn more or register for a Pain Connection Live call, click here. In addition, four new in-person support groups have been added in CA, AL, and NJ. All support groups are led by a person with pain who has received intensive training from Gwenn Herman, LCSW, DCSW, Clinical Director of Pain Connection. Costa Mesa, CA  Date: Second Tuesday of each month. The next meeting is May 14. Time: 11 am – 1 pm Location: Panera Bread at 3030 Harbor Boulevard, Costa Mesa, CA. (Meet against the back wall.) Contact: Kristie McCurdy, MSN, RN, at CRPSsurvivorsOC@gmail.com San Francisco, CA Date: Second and fourth Friday of each month. The next meetings are May 10 and May 24. Time: 12 – 1 pm Location: 1701 Divisedero Street, 5th floor conference room, San Francisco, CA. (Elevator available.) Contact: Cessa Marshal at cessamarshall@yahoo.com or 415-637-1812. Pell City, ALDate: The first meeting will be May 2. Time: 6-7:30 pm. Location: The Brook Besor Coffee Shop, 4204 Martin St. S., Cropwell, AL […]

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FDA, CDC REACT TO HARM TO PAIN PATIENTS

May 1, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation Last month, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reacted to the unintended harm to people living with chronic pain as a result of policy measures intended to ameliorate the opioid crisis. On April 9, the FDA issued a Safety Announcement citing “serious harm,” including “withdrawal symptoms, uncontrolled pain, psychological distress and suicide” as a result of sudden discontinuation or rapid dose decreases in opioid pain medication. The FDA will now require changes to the prescribing information for health care professionals that will provide guidance on how to safely reduce or taper patients off opioid medications. The agency states that there is no standard opioid tapering schedule; rather, a schedule must be tailored to each patient’s unique situation considering a variety of factors, including the type of pain the patient has. The FDA is also warning patients not to suddenly stop taking their opioid medication, as this can result in serious problems. Even when patients gradually reduce these medications, they may still experience withdrawal symptoms such as chills and muscle aches. If these are excessive, patients are encouraged to contact their health care provider. Feeling the pressure from the FDA action, a letter from more than 300 health care practitioners, and increasing news coverage of harms to people with pain, three CDC Guideline authors, writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, said the Guidelines have been misapplied and applied inflexibly in […]

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What doctors don’t learn about death and dying

IDEAS TED.COM Oct 31, 2014 / Atul Gawande Dying and death confront every new doctor and nurse. In this book excerpt, Atul Gawande asks: Why are we not trained to cope with mortality?     I learned about a lot of things in medical school, but mortality wasn’t one of them. I was given a dry, leathery corpse to dissect in my first term — but that was solely a way to learn about human anatomy. Our textbooks had almost nothing on aging or frailty or dying. How the process unfolds, how people experience the end of their lives and how it affects those around them? That all seemed beside the point. The way we saw it — and the way our professors saw it — the purpose of medical schooling was to teach us how to save lives, not how to tend to their demise. The one time I remember discussing mortality was during an hour we spent on The Death of Ivan Ilyich, Tolstoy’s classic novella. It was in a weekly seminar called Patient-Doctor — part of the school’s effort to make us more rounded and humane physicians. Some weeks we would practice our physical examination etiquette; other weeks we’d learn about the effects of socioeconomics and race on health. And one afternoon we contemplated the suffering of Ivan Ilyich as he lay ill and worsening from some unnamed, untreatable disease. The first times, some cry. Some shut down. Some hardly notice. […]

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I’ve Been Nominated For The Disability Award

I’m blown away Stacey Chapman at https://fightingwithfibro.com awarded me The Disability Award. You have to check out her site, here’s the original award post,  https://fightingwithfibro.com/2019/04/27/the-disability-award/ Her sunny personality welcomes you with every post, she’s informative, topics are fresh, up to date and she reviews products we might be interested in. She is very knowledgeable. Following her is a must. As part of my nomination, I choose other Disability Bloggers to give this award to. They are as follows: Wendy at  simplychronicallyill.wordpress.com Patricia at  https://patriciajgrace.wordpress.com Colly at https://dopaminequeen.com Alyssia at https://fightingmsdaily.com Mackenzie at lifewithanillness.com Robert at https://robertmgoldstien.com Gavin at https://sedge.com Nominees: Please answer the questions, choose your own nominees and develop your own set of questions. Stacey’s questions are so good I’m going with her’s. Display the award badge. What was the first sign of your illness? My chest and right clavicle starting hurting and would not go away for months. What is your worst symptom and how do you cope with it? Whatever it takes, pain meds, a nap, meditation, looking at the flower garden, put feet in the pool, letting them float. What one thing about you has changed as a result of your struggles? I understand people with all types of disabilities better. What words of advice or encouragement would you give to someone else suffering? Accept it, embrace your illness as part of your daily life and work on what relieves your pain. Name one good thing that has come out of having […]

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Parathyroid/Health Overview

If calcium levels are low the body goes to your bones to look for calcium, this can lead to Osteoporosis. Anytime your calcium levels are high it shows the Parathyroid is working overtime trying to level your calcium, high calcium is a serious condition. All four of my Parathyroid Glands are not functioning properly and I have the beginning stages of Osteoporosis in my right hip. I have tumors on all four glands, two are small and the two lowers glands have tumors approx. 3-4 inches long. The surgeon will remove and possibly all four once the surgeon takes a look. The surgery itself is only 15-30 minutes with total recovery time approx. three weeks. I am waiting on my surgeon for the surgery date, I expect the surgery to happen in next two weeks. Please, read description and graphic below.  I’ll keep you posted on how the surgery goes and any other information I learn. M You have four Parathyroid Glands on the backside of the Thyroid, they are very small but play a very important role in your health, they keep calcium levels in the body and if calcium level become low the Parathriod Gland produces more hormone to compensate for the low calcium levels.   Illustration of the 4 parathyroid glands located on the back side of the thyroid. We all have 4 parathyroid glands.Parathyroid glands control the amount of calcium in our blood. Everyone has four parathyroid glands, usually […]

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Constantly Evolving: Puberty and Menstruation — Guest Blogger Dr. Lori Gore-Green

Constantly evolving is a new series documenting the ways in which women’s bodies change. Based on the time of the month or period of life, the series hopes to highlight the magnificence of the woman’s body. The previous “Constantly Evolving” article focused on external physical changes girls experience when going through puberty. In conjunction […] Constantly Evolving: Puberty and Menstruation — Dr. Lori Gore-Green

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What You’re Missing If You Think Self-Care Is Just Candles And Bubble Baths

Womens Health By Marissa GainsburgApr 2, 2019 Pampering yourself is great, but challenging yourself? Way better.  I can’t believe I did that. The words flashed through my head over and over like a GIF as I walked alongside thousands of exhausted runners to exit Central Park. I’d just crossed the finish line of the TCS New York City Marathon—my first 26.2—and my cheeks, wrinkled up to my eyes, ached almost as much as my legs. When a photographer snapped a picture, I broke out in happy tears until a weird but powerful calm came over me. I can’t. Believe. I did that. It’s a sentiment I’d chased several times over the past year, the first on a rock-climbing trip in Joshua Tree National Park, then during an intensive hike up two “14ers” (mountain slang for Colorado’s multiple peaks exceeding 14,000 feet). I’d spent months training for each of the three events, dedicating weekdays and Saturdays to workouts and Sundays to recovery—or self-care, as we call it: I foam-rolled, pretzeled my limbs in candlelit yoga, read novels in bed, splurged on $11 smoothies, slathered my skin and hair in masks…you know, the works. Yet even on my most Zen days, nothing came close to the perfect peace I felt after pushing my body to a point it had never been. At first, the fitness editor in me chalked up the bliss to endorphins. But as I melted into the massage table at Connecticut’s serene Mayflower […]

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Special education teacher’s “mental health check in” for students inspires other educators

BY CAITLIN O’KANE APRIL 5, 2019 / 12:00 PM / CBS NEWS A special education teacher from Fremont, California, made a “mental health checklist” for her students. Now, teachers around the world are doing the same.  Erin Castillo posted a photo of her mental health poster on Instagram and it went viral. She made a version of it available to download for free, and teachers around the world are posting photos of the chart in their classrooms. The mental heath checklist asks kids if they are “great,” “okay,” “meh,” “struggling,” “having a hard time” or “in a really dark place.” Students are encouraged to write their names on the back of a post-it and stick it on the poster under the section describing how they’re feeling.  If they put their post-it in the “struggling” section, they know they should try speaking with an adult about their feelings. If they say they are “having a hard time,” or “in a really dark place,” Castillo checks in with them.  The teacher knows it’s important to take time and focus on mental health – especially for high school kids.  “My heart hurts for them,” Castillo wrote on Instagram. “High school is rough sometimes, but I was happy that a few were given a safe space to vent and work through some feelings.” Castillo teaches high school English to special education students, as well as a peer counseling class to general education students, she told CBS News. Her […]

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Clear the toxins from your life-Avoid these ingredients

People Magazine April 22, 2019 Three ingredients to avoid According to Nneka Leiba, Director of Environmental Working Group’s healthy-living science program. Parabens Often used as a preservative in cosmetics and personal-care products, the ingredient is believed to mimic estrogen and potentially cause hormone disruption. Formaldehyde Found in some nail polishes and hair smoothing treatments, it can lead to myriad skin irritations and was deemed carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Phthalates Commonly used as a solvent in the fragrances that scent aftershave, lotion, soap and more, the chemical has been linked to reproduction issues in men.

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Dementia Thoughts

Dementia sucks, it’s fucking life sucking. I watched my granny die from Dementia, you don’t wish that type of death on anyone. Once she no longer knew who she or anyone else was it was crushing. I don’t want to die that way and have been vocal about it to the surprise of my husband, Therapist and Psychiatrist. My decision […]

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Taraji P. Henson Cries While Discussing Mental Health in the Black Community: ‘This Is a National Crisis’

Variety ByDANIEL NISSEN Taraji P. Henson shed light on the history and stigma of mental health in the black community at Variety’s Power of Women NY presented by Lifetime.  Henson received the honor on Friday for her work with the Boris Lawrence Henson Foundation. “Our vision is to eradicate the stigma around mental health in the black community by breaking the silence and breaking a cycle of shame. We were taught to hold our problems close to the vest out of fear of being labeled and further demonized as weak, or inadequate,” said Henson. Breaking down in tears, she called the state of mental health for black people a “national crisis.” “My dad is one of the reasons I started this foundation, and my son, and my neighbor, and my friends, my community, our children is why I keep going,” she said. The actress named the foundation after her father, who experienced mental illness after returning from his tour of duty in Vietnam. She continued, “The history of mental illness for black people in America stretches all the way back 400 years, 15 million people, and an ocean that holds the stories.” Henson reflected on the roles in her career where she has depicted the experiences of black women during Jim Crow segregation. She referenced Katherine Johnson, a NASA mathematician who helped launch the first man in space, and Catana Starks, the first black woman to coach a college men’s golf team. Finally, […]

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HOLISTIC APPROACHES TO CHRONIC PAIN *U.S. Pain Foundation*

March 4, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation By Deborah Ellis, ND, CTN If you’re like me, and millions of others, you’ve probably suffered with chronic pain for a year or longer. Chronic pain affects 50 million Americans, 20 million of whom have high-impact chronic pain. It has been linked to increased risk of major mental conditions including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Science understands a body in chronic pain continually sends stress signals to the brain, leading to a heightened perception of not only the pain itself but also the perceived level of threat. It’s a vicious cycle that’s hard to break or control. When a person is diagnosed with pain, the first line of treatment is typically pain medication. But while these medications may work for some people, in others, the side effects—ranging from nausea to heart complications—may outweigh the relief. For patients looking to explore a holistic pain management program, whether alone or in tandem with traditional medicine, there are a number of options to consider. Let’s review a few of the more common holistic strategies available today. Acupuncture Chiropractic Exercise Massage Stress-reduction techniques like mindfulness and meditation training Vitamin or herbal supplements Aloe vera ACUPUNCTURE Acupuncture, common in Chinese medicine, involves inserting thin, tiny needles into certain points of the body. Traditional Chinese practitioners believe acupuncture balances the flow of energy or life force — known as qi or chi. Western practitioners see it as a way to […]

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Hope Is An Action

April 2019 E-Newsletter Explore Your Definition Of Hope And Experience What It Can Inspire You To Do! Bring Change to Mind’s High School Program is proud to introduce its first collective call to action week for all participating clubs nationwide. Starting April 8th, we are dedicating this five-day campaign to the hashtag “Hope Is An Action.” We invite our entire community to join us in sharing this inspirational week with your family, friends, and social networks. Throughout this week, we aim to encourage communities to explore what hope means to them by exploring their own definition of hope, what it can look like, and experiencing what it can inspire you to do. These hopeful discoveries can be used to incite positive change while nurturing empathetic and compassionate conversations about mental health. For each day’s theme, BC2M has suggested a few different ways you can engage in this campaign. Most activities incorporate social media presence to spread the message throughout your community and throughout the greater BC2M community. We are thrilled to have our 180 clubs and more than 5.000 club members participate in our first BC2M-wide campaign activation and we can’t wait for you to be a part of this collective! Hope is something that everyone needs and it is particularly important to those living with mental illness. We ‘hope” that you will be inspired to join this growing movement of mental health advocacy and share the importance of compassion with […]

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If you’re unhappy with your body, just repeat after us: You are the new hotness

IDEAS.TED.COM Mar 28, 2019 / Emily Nagoski + Amelia Nagoski Ashley Lukashevsky Too many of us struggle to achieve a body ideal that’s just not obtainable by humans. It’s time to redefine what’s good, healthy and attractive on our own terms, say writers (and sisters) Emily Nagoski and Amelia Nagoski. The Bikini Industrial Complex. That’s our name for the $100 billion cluster of businesses that profit by setting an unachievable “aspirational ideal,” convincing us that we can and should — indeed we must — conform with the ideal, and then selling us ineffective but plausible strategies for achieving that ideal. It’s like old cat pee in the carpet, powerful and pervasive and it makes you uncomfortable every day but it’s invisible and no one can remember a time when it didn’t smell. Let’s shine a black light on it, so you can know where the smell is coming from. You already know that basically everything in the media is there to sell you thinness — the shellacked abs in ads for exercise equipment, the “one weird trick to lose belly fat” clickbait when all you wanted was a weather forecast, and the “flawless” thin women who fill most TV shows. The Bikini Industrial Complex, or BIC, has successfully created a culture of immense pressure to conform to an ideal that is literally unobtainable by almost everyone and yet is framed not just as the most beautiful, but the healthiest and […]

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Therapeutic Lavender Oat Scrub

Willow and Sage by Stampington   This itch-relief scrub is therapeutic on so many levels. It contains sugar to help exfoliate, oils to help hydrate, and oatmeal to help alleviate any irritation. The ground lavender buds are optional but they do add some spa-like qualities-yes, please. You Will Need 1 cup steel-cut oats Blender/Food Processor 1 TB. dried lavender buds Mortar & pestle […]

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From One Sarcastic Little Shit To Another – Happy Mother’s Day — Guest Invisibly Me

This day can be difficult and painful for many; I don’t want to be insensitive covering Mother’s Day so please feel free to avoid this post if it may be triggering. There are many who don’t have a relationship with their mothers, and those who have traumatic ones. Then there are those who have said […] via From One Sarcastic Little Shit To Another – Happy Mother’s Day — Invisibly Me

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I Believe in You #WATWB Two Year Anniversary

              Welcome to #WATWB # 22! We are sharing stories about people doing good work and bringing hope to the world.  To learn more about this monthly blogfest, visit https://www.damyantiwrites.com/we-are-the-world-blogfest/ and the WATWB Facebook page for more positive posts.   I saw Kevin Laue on television with a group of kids playing basketball. It was amazing to see the faces, looks of children feeling like they belonged for the first time. He is very upbeat and is making a difference in our youth across the country. Melinda Believe in you Tour Our mission is for every student in America to have someone who believes in them. That’s why we’ve created the Believe In You Challenge. The Challenge is for students to attend a school activity they never have before. Swim meets. Track meets. Plays. Choir concerts. Pick it, grab your friends, and go. Show each other that support! Share your acceptance of this Challenge using hashtag #BelieveInYouChallenge. If not you, then who? Believe in you Video Series    Just Click on Video STEP UP. IF NOT YOU, WHO? Believe in You is an episodic series designed to educate students and staff about the incredible power of believing in yourself, despite the challenges and trials that life may present. Hosted by Kevin Laue, and starring personalities from around the country who have overcome personal challenges to accomplish the extraordinary. Each episode comes with an accompanying […]

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An Olympic training approach to managing bipolar disorder — Guest Shedding Light on Mental Health

Guest Amy Gamble from http://www.sheddinglightonmentalhealth.com I was talking with a friend at the National Council on Behavioral Health’s annual conference in Nashville. We had just watched a movie about Andy Irons a world-class surfer who had bipolar disorder and died at 37. It was an emotional documentary. I felt sad. But the emotion that got my attention was anger. […] via An Olympic training approach to managing bipolar disorder — Shedding Light on Mental Health

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The Healing Power of Telling Your Trauma Story

Psychology Today  March 6, 2019 Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. Think, Act, Be When we’ve survived an extremely upsetting event, it can be painful to revisit the memory. Many of us would prefer not to talk about it, whether it was a car accident, fire, assault, medical emergency, or something else. However, our trauma memoriescan continue to haunt us, even — or especially — if we try to avoid them. The more we push away the memory, the more the thoughts tend to intrude on our minds, as many research studies have shown. If and how we decide to share our trauma memories is a very personal choice, and we have to choose carefully those we entrust with this part of ourselves. When we do choose to tell our story to someone we trust, the following benefits may await. (Please note that additional considerations are often necessary for those with severe and prolonged experiences of trauma or abuse, as noted below.) 1. Feelings of shame subside.  Keeping trauma a secret can reinforce the feeling that there’s something shameful about what happened — or even about oneself on a more fundamental level. We might believe that others will think less of us if we tell them about our traumatic experience. When we tell our story and find support instead of shame or criticism, we discover we having nothing to hide. You might even notice a shift in your posture over time — that thinking about or describing your trauma no longer makes […]

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Justin Bieber Opens Up About Mental Health on Instagram

Teen Vouge By De Elizabeth March 10, 2019 Getty Images “Been struggling a lot. Just feeling super disconnected and weird.”  Justin Bieber got real about mental health again — and asked his fans for their continued support. In an Instagram post on March 10, the singer-songwriter expressed that he wanted to update his fans on what he’s been going through, in hopes that it will “resonate” with his followers. “Been struggling a lot. Just feeling super disconnected and weird,” he wrote, adding that he always “bounces back” so he isn’t worried. Still, he said that having his fans’ support and positivity is helpful, adding that he’s been “facing my stuff head-on.” From the comments, it’s clear Justin’s fans have his back every step of the way. One fan, who shared that they experience depression, wrote: “Love you always and I hope you can find a way to feel better and more like yourself again.” Another Belieber told the singer, “We all believe in you!” View this post on Instagram Just wanted to keep you guys updated a little bit hopefully what I’m going through will resonate with you guys. Been struggling a lot. Just feeling super disconnected and weird.. I always bounce back so I’m not worried just wanted to reach out and ask for your guys to pray for me. God is faithful and ur prayers really work thanks .. the most human season I’ve ever been in facing my […]

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Throat got You down? Updated!

  Magnolia Issue #10 Throat Soother 1 large lemon Ginger root, fresh 2″ knob Turmeric root, fresh 2″ knob 2 cinnamon sticks 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/2 cup honey Slice lemon, ginger, and turmeric paper-thin using a mandolin or sharp knife. Layer slices in a half-pint jar. Break cinnamon sticks lengthwise into several pieces and tuck them in jar. Add apple cider vinegar. Pour Pour honey into the jar, covering the other ingredients. Place jar in the refrigerator. The honey becomes thin syrup and read to use in 12 hours. To Use Stir up 1/4 cup into a hot tea or water: or take 1-2 tsp. syrup each hour as needed to soothe sore throat or cough. Shake the jar occasionally. Keep Refrigerated for up to three weeks. BONUS Grannies Recipe Mix equal parts honey, whiskey and lemon. Refrigerate in a pint jar, leave a spoon in and take a spoonful or two every time your throat needs it. Super Bonus Gramps Recipe Keep the bottle of Black Velvet on the nightstand, when you wake yourself up coughing, take a sig.

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Thoughts on Job Hunting: Interview Tips

Interview Tips If a job requires a resume, always take an extra copy. Take it out at first of interview and lay in lap. The greatest interview is being able to give examples of tasks or projects. As your interviewer doesn’t want to read what you’ve already written, give day-to-day details. If you pitched in while someone was on maternity leave […]

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Thoughts on Job Hunting

For many Spring Break is time to job hunt before the next school year starts. I worked in the Recruiting/Consulting/Staffing business for 30 years. I wanted to share some lessons that helped me and got me fired twice. Drawing the Line It can be difficult to draw the work/friend line for extroverted people, you may think your new lunch mates are […]

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