April is Sexual Assualt Awareness Month

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Part of raising awareness around sexual assault is not only highlighting the work being done to bring it to an end, but also focusing on supporting the health and well-being of survivors. Especially during these weeks of uncertainty and isolation, we know that the pressure experienced by survivors of violence can significantly increase.  Pain and […]

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#WATWB JOANN Stores are Handing Out Free Fabric Supplies at Curbside to Anyone Sewing Face Masks at Home

“…We hope to share the stories that show kindness, compassion, hope, overcoming challenges and in general, the impressive resilience of the human spirit. For every dark, negative story out there, there is a positive, heartwarming story that will add some light and lift the human spirit.” Belinda Witzenhausen Goodnewsnetwork.org By Andy Corbley – Mar 24, 2020 In a national emergency, some people’s initial […]

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Things You Can Do to Stay Mentally Healthy During Self-Isolation — Guest Blogger Damon Ashworth Psychology

With the COVID-19 pandemic, we are now being told that the most helpful thing we can do is stay at home and remain physically distant from others. Unless you are in an essential profession, this could be a time to slow down. To check in with those that you care most about. To chat for longer and to connect emotionally. To reflect on your life and rediscover what really matters to you. To hope and dream and plan for a better future. And to try things that you otherwise may not have had the chance or the time to do. Things You Can Do to Stay Mentally Healthy During Self-Isolation — Damon Ashworth Psychology

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Yale's Popular Happiness Class Is Now Available Online for Free — Here's What It Entails

The course, taught by psychology professor Laurie Santos, focuses on understanding happiness in life By  Eric Todisco March 24, 2020 10:55 AM Yale University has the perfect solution to keeping happiness alive amid the trying times of the coronavirus pandemic. The Connecticut-based Ivy League college is making its widely-popular “happiness” course available online for free via Coursera. According to Yale’s news site, the online […]

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Bill to Provide Service Dogs for Veterans with PTSD Passes House Unanimously

7 Feb 2020Military.com | By  Dorothy Mills-Gregg A decade-long effort to have the Department of Veterans Affairs provide service dogs to veterans with mental health issues passed a major hurdle with House passage Wednesday. The Puppies Assisting Wounded Servicemembers, or PAWS for Veterans Therapy Act, would have the VA create a 5-year pilot to give grants to one or more organizations to train and provide service dogs to […]

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What Is Coronavirus (COVID- 19)?

It’s impossible to talk about travel right now without addressing coronavirus. As the COVID-19 virus continues to spread, sharing accurate information is crucial to both help stem fear and arm ourselves and our loved ones with knowledge. For this reason, we have created a guide on coronavirus, informed by reliable sources like the CDC and World Health Organization. Stay safe […]

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MIGRAINE DISEASES MAKES NATIONAL HEADLINES

March 3, 2020/ U.S. Pain Foundation Headache and migraine diseases captured attention nationally throughout February thanks to features on ABC’s Good Morning America, CBS’s Sunday Morning Show, and PBS’s NewsHour. Members of the INvisible Project were highlighted on all three stations. On Feb. 25, Dr. William B. Young, a headache specialist at Jefferson Headache Center and contributing writer for the INvisible Project, discussed the reality and […]

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What is Hypogammaglobulinemia?

I’ve recently been diagnosed with the immune disorder Hypogammaglobulinemia which requires the expertise of an Endocrinologist doctor. My doctor isn’t sure how I contracted since I don’t fit any of the noted categories. My thoughts are it’s either my Lithium which I’ve taken for over 35 years or a result of Lyme Diseases. Lyme may sound like a stretch or crazy but one of the first things my PA told me is since Lyme has no cure and the virus is live in your body you will get other illnesses over time. So far she has been right. I have Fibromyalgia and full-body arthritis. Lyme isn’t a stretch to me. We’ll see as more testing is done. Like Lyme infusion treatment is necessary, some require only one treatment and others require ongoing infusion treatment. Hearing this makes me think of the nine months I spent on IV Infusion Therapy for Lyme. I am remaining optimistic only one injection will be needed. I’ll keep you posted and I learn more from the additional testing and meeting the Endocrinologist. Melinda Overview Hypogammaglobulinemia is a problem with the immune system that prevents it from making enough antibodies called immunoglobulins. Antibodies are proteins that help your body recognize and fight off foreign invaders like bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Without enough antibodies, you’re more likely to get infections. People with hypogammaglobulinemia can more easily catch pneumonia, meningitis, and other infections that a healthy immune system […]

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About Coronavirus and Lyme

published 3/4/20 About Coronavirus (Covid-19) and Lyme Many people with and without Lyme are fearful of Coronavirus also called Covid-19. In my Seattle Lyme practice, I am answering questions about what one should do to protect themselves and to boost their immune systems. Many wonder if immune dysregulation, caused by Lyme, increases their chances of acquiring the virus, having a […]

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Does CBD Topical Pain Cream Work?

I have been trying CBD products over the past two years but have not used topicals, not sure why but this week changed everything. I didn’t use the Redeem brand even though I did buy their Spray CBD. I had used several samples of topical CBD and that is not enough to know if relief can be found. I have […]

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#WATWB After Decade of Historic Growth, Wind Power is Now the Most-Used Renewable Energy Source in US

 By Good News Network – Feb 27, 2020 For the first time in U.S. history, the amount of electric power generated from wind in 2019 exceeded the amount sourced from hydroelectric. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s newly-released Electric Power Monthly, the exciting milestone means that wind is now the top renewable source of electricity generation in the country—a position previously held by […]

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Seven herbal medicines can kill Lyme disease bacteria in test tube

News LymeDisease.org 21FEB2020 Researchers have determined that seven herbal medicines are highly active in test tubes against B. burgdorferi, the bacteriathat causes Lyme disease, compared to the control antibiotics, doxycycline and cefuroxime. Published in the journalFrontiers in Medicine, the laboratory study was funded by the Bay Area Lyme Foundation and supported in part by The Steven & Alexandra Cohen Foundation. Researchers at Johns Hopkins […]

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The Tick Expert on the Go

I found this app today and it sounds like a great resource, or the best resource we have to date. Please check it out. Melinda By: Bieneke Bron, Maria del Pilar Fernandez, Pallavi Kache, University of Wisconsin – Madison & Columbia University04 June 2019 According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of people getting diseases transmitted by ticks, mosquitoes and fleas has tripled in recent years. Milder winters and warmer springs and falls are making matters worse by expanding the ticks’ range to new areas. Ticks are small but mighty adversaries. They represent a real threat to humans since they carry several infectious diseases, including the bacteria that causes typhus and Lyme disease (or Lyme borreliosis), which can be chronic and debilitating. These tick-borne diseases should be a serious concern if you live in a high-risk area, work with animals or spend a lot of time in nature, so you need to plan accordingly. If you might encounter ticks for any reason, then you should download “The Tick App” as your expert on the go. Since ticks are often found in rural or less populated areas, you may have trouble looking up information on the internet due to limited connectivity. With the app, you’ll have information readily available to understand tick prevention options, potential areas where you may encounter ticks, and most importantly, ways to remove ticks after exposure. Users in the Northeast and Midwest can use the […]

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Touched by Suicide

Twenty-eight years ago my father killed himself, I was twenty-eight years old. It’s strange that my father has been dead as long as he was alive in my life. I’ve written about his suicide many times over the years but this year feels different. It’s hard to put into words but I’ll share what words come to mind. I knew […]

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Last Birthday Song

Every year after I left home my grandparents would get on the phone together and sing Happy Birthday to me. It became a much-loved family tradition. Eight years ago today my gramps died, before he slipped into a coma he sang his last words, Happy Birthday to my brother. It was a great gift to leave him. Eight years ago […]

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HEARING ON MEDICAL CANNABIS IMPORTANT PROGRESS; TAKE ACTION TO ASK FOR SECOND HEARING

January 31, 2020/ U.S. Pain Foundation/ 0 Comments On Jan. 15, the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health held a hearing on discrepancies between state and federal medical cannabis policy and federal roadblocks to clinical research. Many felt the conversation was long overdue. “I honestly never dreamed I would see, in my lifetime, such progress and discussion on the need for […]

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Male Survivor Big Changes Coming

Since its founding 25 years ago, MaleSurvivor has played a leadership role in advocating for male survivors who have experienced sex abuse in any context, either as children or adults. Here’s a quick update:We’re planning our next major conference for 2021. It will mirror our groundbreaking series of biennial conferences that were available in years past. These events featured programs designed […]

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Medicare and Medicaid will cover Acupunture for Chronic Low Back Pain

Dear U.S. Pain Foundation volunteers, We are pleased to share that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will cover acupuncture for chronic low back pain (CLBP). The news comes following a series of open comment periods offered by CMS on the topic. We alerted our volunteers to the second comment period earlier this summer, and many of you took the time to respond. The second open comment period saw an impressive 644 submitted comments, most of them patients. (You can read U.S. Pain Foundation’s submitted comments here.) Why this mattersAs an organization, we support public and private payer coverage of acupuncture for people living with all diseases, injuries, and conditions that cause chronic pain. This decision validates the advocacy work of many of us in the pain community, who have been urging CMS to cover more nonpharmacological therapies for chronic pain. While this one modality may not help everyone with chronic low back pain, it’s important that patients have the opportunity to try it. It’s also important because Medicare coverage standards help inform private insurance policy.  Who is eligibleCMS defines chronic low back pain as lasting 12 weeks or longer, and as being nonspecific, in that it has no identifiable systemic cause, is not associated with surgery, and is not associated with pregnancy. Under this new decision, up to 12 visits in 90 days are covered for Medicare beneficiaries who meet the criteria. An additional eight sessions will be […]

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Flowly: Relaxation Training and 30 Day Trial

Dear pain warriors,Increased stress, anxiety, and trouble sleeping are common for people living with chronic pain. Unfortunately, stress, anxiety, and poor sleep can make pain worse, and vice versa. It’s a vicious cycle.That’s why we are delighted to share a new tool for managing anxiety, stress, and sleep, and by association, managing pain: Flowly: Relaxation Training. Flowly is an iPhone app that combines biofeedback and virtual reality (VR) using either just your phone or a bluetooth sensor. From the comfort of your home, Flowly lets you see how your heart rate and breathing change as you engage in VR. By being able to see your heart rate and breathing, you can learn to make changes in your body to reduce anxiety, reduce pain, and in some cases, even increase sleep and focus. In case studies, Flowly helped reduce pain an average of 46 percent after each session. It is currently partnering with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on an upcoming clinical trial.One-month, risk-free trialFlowly understands how important it is to be able to try a therapy option before investing money in it. Here’s how their one-month, risk-free trial works: download the Flowly app and sign up for the monthly or annual subscription. Flowly will automatically send you a kit, including one VR headset and heart rate sensor (the cost of the kit is included in your subscription).If you wish to discontinue Flowly, just send back the kit before the end of the first month, and […]

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Can A Spine Stimulator Stop Chronic Pain?

After working with a Pain Management doctor for six months he’s determined I’m a good candidate for a Spine Stimulator. It works by leads placed in your mid-back attached to the implanted stimulation device, the stimulation disrupts the pain signals to the brain thus relieving the pain. I had my psychological evaluation yesterday and now waiting for insurance approval. My […]

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Mens Healing new video “Beyond Survival: Hope and Healing on Kilimanjaro”

Dear friends,“Beyond Survival: Hope and Healing on Kilimanjaro” is the 11th addition to the MenHealing library of videos that feature the healing journeys of male survivors. This 22-minute video chronicles the incredible journey of Weekend Of Recovery Alumnus Jordan Masciangelo’s successful climb to the 19,341 foot summit of Africa’s Mt. Kilimanjaro In January 2019 This Expedition Climb project was a labor of […]

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Looking For The Light is Texas Ambassador for U.S. Pain Foundation

U.S. Pain Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to improving the lives of people with chronic conditions that cause pain. HERE ARE SOME OF THE PROGRAMS WE OFFER: Awareness & Advocacy Programs INvisible Project Advocacy Program Pain Awareness Month Points For Pain Medical Cannabis Program Support & Empowerment Programs Pain Connection Pain Ambassador Network Pediatric Pain Warriors Share Your Story […]

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Dealing with the realities of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

A Publication of the American Counseling Association DOWNLOAD  By Bethany Bray Licensed professional counselor (LPC) Ruth Drew oversees the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24-hour helpline, which offers support to those facing the challenges of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, including families and caregivers. The fact that the helpline receives more than 300,000 calls each year hints at the heart-wrenching issues that accompany a dementia diagnosis, not just for the individual but for the person’s entire support system. “We receive a wide range of questions, from someone worried about the warning signs of cognitive decline or dealing with a new diagnosis, to an adult son whose mother didn’t recognize him for the first time, or a wife wondering how to get her husband with Alzheimer’s to take a bath. Whatever the reason for the call, we meet callers where they are and endeavor to provide the information, resources and emotional support they need,” says Drew, director of information and support services at the Chicago-based nonprofit. Professional counselors are a good fit to help not only individuals with dementia and Alzheimer’s, but also those in their care networks, Drew says. Whether counseling individuals, couples or even children, the far-reaching implications of dementia mean that practitioners of any specialization may hear clients talk about the stressors and overwhelming emotions that can accompany the diagnosis. “People diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and other dementia diseases are going through profound life changes — coping with the realities of an incurable disease […]

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Hope For Depression Research Foundation, Inspired by the Hope in all of us

I found out about this exciting group from a fragrance advertisement for Hope, Hope Sport, and Hope Night, all available at Bergdorf Goodman.com. All net profits support Hope For Depression Research Foundation. Learn more at HOPEFORDEPRESSION.ORG Please check out their site, it’s packed full of information and resources. Melinda Our Mission The mission of the Hope for Depression Research Foundation (HDRF) is to fund cutting-edge, scientific research into the origins, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of depression and its related mood and other emotional disorders – bipolar disorder, postpartum depression, post-traumatic stress syndrome, anxiety disorder and suicide. In 2010, HDRF launched its Depression Task Force (DTF) – an outstanding collaboration of seven leading scientists, at the frontiers of brain science, from different research institutions across the U.S. and Canada.  These scientists have developed an unprecedented research plan that integrates the most advanced knowledge in genetics, epigenetics, molecular biology, electrophysiology, and brain imaging. To accelerate breakthrough research, they share ongoing results, in real time, at a centralized data bank, the HDRF Data Center. HDRF was founded in April 2006 by Audrey Gruss in memory of her mother, Hope, who suffered from clinical depression. Every dollar raised goes directly to research. Founder’s Message My mother Hope suffered from depression for most of her late adult life. My sisters, father and I witnessed decades of misdiagnosis, trials of medication, troublesome side effects and the psychic pain and life-sapping loss of energy that is a mark […]

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When college students post about depression on Facebook

Jan 07,2020 Jeff Grabmeier Ohio State News grabmeier.1@osu.edu Study suggests friends don’t encourage them to seek help When college students post about feelings of depression on Facebook, their friends are unlikely to encourage them to seek help, a small study suggests. In fact, in this study, none of the 33 participating students said their friends told them they should reach out to a mental health professional to discuss their problems. Instead, most friends simply sent supportive or motivating messages.Scottye CashBut that may not be good enough for people who are truly depressed – as some of the people in this study probably were, said Scottye Cash, lead author of the study and professor of social work at The Ohio State University. “It makes me concerned that none of the Facebook friends of students in this study were proactive in helping their friend get help,” Cash said. “We need to figure out why.” The research, published online recently in the journal JMIR Research Protocols, is part of a larger online study of health outcomes of 287 students at four universities in the Midwest and West. This study included the 33 students in the larger study who reported that they had “reached out on Facebook for help when depressed.” The students reported what type of post they made and how their friends responded. They also completed a measure of depression. Results showed that nearly half of the participants reported symptoms consistent with moderate or severe […]

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Survivors Blog Here Welcomes Ann Bale from Don’t Lose Hope

Please join me in welcoming Ann Bale from Don’t Lose hope to Survivors Blog Here. We are excited to have her as a Contributor and look forward to a great 2020.  Ann has a Master’s Degree in Psychology, a Diploma in Clinical and Pastoral Counselling, and has completed a year of psychotherapy training. She has worked as a counsellor in private practice, and has taught in schools and colleges (both online and in classroom settings.) In addition to this, she has written accredited certificate, diploma and degree courses in counselling and psychology, in the UK and in North America. Ann has been working in education, counselling and psychology for over 30 years. Ann’s blog Don’t Lose Hope, http://sexaddictionpartners@wordpress.com supports, helps heal and educate partners of sexual addiction. We are committed to sharing knowledge and offering support to those whose lives have been affected by addiction, are dealing with a crisis, have experienced a trauma, are walking through a period of grief and loss, or who are working on relationship issues. You can reach Ann at ann@coachingskillsintl.com. Please stop by, welcome Ann and be sure to check out her website. Melinda 

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Powering Down at Night Time

Great suggestions from Willow and Sage by Stamptington Simple Sleep Remedies Set a consistent sleeping schedule. Going to sleep and waking up at the same time each day helps regulate your internal clock, making it easier to fall asleep and get up in the morning refreshed. Drink plenty of water throughout the day, but stop at least two hours before […]

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Gluten-Free Salmon with Lime and Sesame Seeds Great for the Season

Gluten-Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD with Susie Flaherty   Ingredients: 1 1/2 to 2 pounds salmon (wild-caught preferred with skin on) Juice from 2-3 limes Olive Oil Sesame Seeds Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and coat very lightly with olive oil. Place salmon, skin side down, on parchment paper in the pan. Squees the juice of 2-3 limes into a bowl. Use a pastry brush to coat salmon with lime juice. Coat the top of the salmon with sesame seeds. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. Be careful to not overcook.  

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Lena Dunham opens up about drug addiction: ‘Pills I thought dulled my pain actually created it’

‘When I was dropped off at rehab, I thought it was the end of my life,’ says Dunham Clémence MichallonNew York @Clemence_Mcl Monday 28 October 2019 16:42  Lena Dunham attends the Friendly House 30th annual awards luncheon on 26 October, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. ( Vince Bucci/Getty Images for Friendly House ) Lena Dunham has opened up about her prescription drugs addiction and her newfound sobriety. The actor was named Woman of the Year by Friendly House, an addiction treatment facility for women in Los Angeles. “I didn’t think that I was a drug addict,” Dunham, who has previously said she used to misuse prescription medication, said while accepting the honour at a luncheon this weekend, according to Variety. Speaking in more detail about her former struggle around drugs, she added that “pills that I thought dulled my pain actually created it”. Dunham, who has been sober for 18 months, first disclosed her history of drug abuse last year in a podcast with Dax Shepard.     At that time, she told the actor she had “misused [benzodiazepines]” for three years, adding: “Nobody I know who are prescribed these medications is told, ‘By the way, when you try and get off this, it’s going to be like the most hellacious acid trip you’ve ever had where you’re f****** clutching the walls and the hair is blowing off your head and you can’t believe you found yourself in this situation.” During this weekend’s event, Dunham explained how media portrayals had skewed her […]

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Congress has a bill to expand medical marijuana and CBD research

Dear U.S. Pain Foundation advocates,  We wanted to let you know about an opportunity to take action on a federal bill that would expand and coordinate scientific research of cannabidiol (CBD) or marijuana-derived products, allowing researchers to better understand their potential efficacy and safety. While medical cannabis is increasingly available in a number of states nationwide, too often, there is little clinical data available to help patients and health care providers make informed decisions about whether it would work well for their specific condition, or how much and what type to use.    Introduced by Senators Dianne Feinstein, Chuck Grassley, and Brian Schatz, The Cannabidiol and Marihuana Research Expansion Act (S. 2032) would streamline the research process, eliminating the lengthy delays and roadblocks researchers face when trying to study medical marijuana and CBD-derived products.  Why U.S. Pain supports S. 2032We believe people with chronic illness and pain should have access to all safe, effective treatments, including medical cannabis. Research is critical as it would lead to increased understanding about cannabis as a therapeutic option (including efficacy, safety, proper dosing, best delivery methods, etc.) and may lead to new, FDA-approved treatment options for people with pain.  Now is the time to take action U.S. Pain has created two online campaigns for advocates on this issue because we’d like to accomplish two goals:  1. Have the Senate Committee on the Judiciary schedule a hearing on the bill2. Gain additional cosponsors of the bill Click here and see if your Senator sits on […]

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Ketamine and Future Depression Treatments

October 16, 2019 Psychiatry Advisor Contributing Writer Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Reddit Print Share by Email Researchers are hailing ketamine as the most significant new development in psychiatry given its high efficacy for treating major depression. Recent evidence has shown that in addition to depression, ketamine may also be a promising treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a number of other treatment-refractory neuropsychiatric disorders. In a recent paper published in Drug Discovery Today, researchers explore ketamine’s role in revolutionizing new mental health treatments and discuss how this drug’s mechanism of action has led to an influx of new research and studies on depression treatment. Ketamine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1970 as an anesthetic and safe alternative to phencyclidine. The therapeutic benefits of ketamine as an antidepressant were explored years later because of a stigma on from its widespread recreational use during the late 1960s and 1970s, and this agent was initially only administered intravenously. In 2000, researchers found that ketamine had strong, fast-acting, and long-term effects in depression. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design study, patients with depression received 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine or saline on the first day of testing. Treatments were switched 1 week later. Researchers found that the antidepressant effects of ketamine began within 4 hours, peaked at 72 hours, and lasted for 1 to 2 weeks thereafter.1 In a 2006 study, this finding was […]

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Bring Change To Mind November Newsletter

BC2M 4th Annual SF Student Summit 300 BC2M High School club members gathered in San Francisco on November 2nd to mark our 4th Annual Student Summit. Thanks to our amazing host, Pinterest, these teens spent an afternoon engaging in mental health conversations, participating in exciting activities, and meeting other students from around the Bay Area. We are so grateful for our keynote speaker, Jen Gotch, CCO and founder of ban.do, in sharing her personal story and path to successfully managing her mental illness. She spent hours engaging in Q&A following her time on stage!After a morning filled with various speakers and an exciting activity fair, our students dispersed into breakout sessions where they chose workshop tracks covering the following topics: Advocacy in High School and Beyond; Mental Health & Interpersonal Relationships; Mental Health in the 21st Century; and Identity and Mental Health. The track system was a hit and our students gave us amazing feedback on this new change we implemented. The BC2M Summit is one of the biggest highlights of the year for the students and allows them to learn from one another, build a movement of change in their community, deepen their understanding of mental health topics, and make life-long friends. With the inspiration and hope that filled the room, we know that these students will put an end to stigma and create a more empathetic and compassionate world.  Special thanks to our sponsors for making the event possible: […]

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Why Joker’s depiction of mental illness is dangerously misinformed

Annabel Driscoll and Mina Husain The Guardian Mon 21 Oct 2019 11.04 EDT With films playing a key role in shaping attitudes to mental health, two doctors say Joaquin Phoenix’s troubled supervillain perpetuates damaging stereotypes As junior doctors who work on acute inpatient psychiatric wards, serious mental illness is our daily reality. We have, therefore, watched the controversies around Todd Phillips’s Joker – in which Joaquin Phoenix plays a troubled loner who turns to violence – with professional interest. The film’s dominance in the debate about portrayals of mental illness in the movies comes at a curious time. Recently, we’ve witnessed great leaps of awareness about relatively common mental-health issues such as depression and anxiety, and with that awareness, increasing dismissal of the sort of unhelpful prejudices that used to surround them. These are now readily discussed without shame and often represented in the media with a well-informed grasp of the facts, thanks to effective information campaigns. Joker review – the most disappointing film of the year 2 out of 5 stars.     Read more However, severe mental health conditions, such as psychotic illnesses, remain shrouded in stigma and are consistently misrepresented and misunderstood. Portrayals of mental illness in film can perpetuate unfounded stereotypes and spread misinformation. One of the more toxic ideas that Joker subscribes to is the hackneyed association between serious mental illness and extreme violence. The notion that mental deterioration necessarily leads to violence against others – implied by the juxtaposition of Phoenix’s character Arthur stopping […]

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Treating Lyme with Marty Ross MD-Probiotics

Dear Subscriber, Most people with Lyme disease should take probiotics while they are in treatment. However, not all probiotics are created equal. And there are different types of probiotics for different situations. In Probiotics in Lyme Treatment I explain the different kinds of probiotics. Preventing yeast requires a different probiotic strategy than treating active yeast infection. Some on antibiotics may also develop an intestinal infection problem called C. Difficile. In Probiotics in Lyme Treatment I show you which probiotic products to use for each of these situations and describe how to dose them. In Health, Marty Ross MD  Read Now Spread the Word!   ShareTweetForward Quality Matters. See the various probiotic products I use successfully in my practice at Marty Ross MD Healing Arts.  Look Now

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U.S. PAIN FOUNDATION SUBMITS COMMENTS TO CMS RFI

October 16, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation/ 0 Comments October 11, 2019 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Comments on the Request for Information (RFI) on the Development of a CMS Action Plan to Prevent Opioid Addiction and Enhance Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment The U.S. Pain Foundation is pleased to respond to CMS’s request for information to inform the development of a CMS Action plan to prevent opioid addiction and improve the treatment of acute and chronic pain. The U.S. Pain Foundation is the largest 501 (c) (3) organization for people who live with chronic pain from a myriad of diseases, conditions and serious injuries. Our mission is to connect, support, educate and advocate for those living with chronic pain, as well as their caregivers and healthcare providers. Chronic pain is an enormous public health problem. The CDC and NIH have reported that 50 million Americans live with chronic pain and 19.6 million live with high-impact chronic pain that interferes with their ability to 1 There are currently very few highly effective treatments for many pain conditions. Managing pain is a matter of finding the right combination of treatments that allows pain sufferers to function and have some quality of life. We believe people with chronic pain should have access to a wide range of therapies and treatments because pain is very individual – what helps one person living with pain will not necessarily help another.Most people living with chronic pain spend […]

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INTERIM CEO A KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT AMERICAN MASSAGE THERAPY ASSOCIATION CONVENTION

October 31, 2019/ U.S. Pain Foundation/ 0 Comments Interim CEO Nicole Hemmenway was one of three keynote speakers at the closing session of the American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) national convention last weekend in Indianapolis, IN. In her talk, “Massage for Chronic Pain: What our community wants you to know,” Hemmenway shared her personal journey with complex regional pain syndrome and why she’s dedicated herself to helping others with pain through the U.S. Pain Foundation. She gave attendees a glimpse into the programs and services U.S. Pain offers, and provided insight into the scope of the chronic pain health crisis in America. The emphasis of Hemmenway’s remarks was on the barriers to multidisciplinary care, particularly massage, and how massage therapists can best help people with pain. “It truly was a privilege to be invited by the AMTA to speak at their annual convention,” Hemmenway says. “There is a greater need, maybe now more than ever, for affordable access to multidisciplinary care, such as massage therapy. I was so impressed with the therapists I spoke to who are genuinely invested in patient’s overall wellness. But like the pain community, they also feel discouraged by the lack of access. That is why it is so important for us to use our voices to fight for better coverage of options like massage.” Hemmenway shared feedback from the pain community about what they wanted massage therapists to know, including: People with pain have bodies that are […]

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The hidden abuse that can hurt your mental health: Gaslighting

Nearly half the women and men in the U.S. say they’ve endured psychological aggression from intimate partners. OCT. 4, 201903:45Oct. 4, 2019, 6:22 AM CDTBy Bianca Seidman Domestic abuse is a leading problem in American homes and it can take many different forms. When the abuse leaves no physical marks, outsiders may not recognize when all is not well and the abused person can find it challenging to translate what’s happening. “Gaslighting” — a term that became popular after the 1944 movie “Gaslight,” in which a husband slowly makes his wife think she’s going crazy through a long game of deceptions — is an insidious form of psychological abuse. It’s an intricate web of lies woven to break down one partner’s sense of self-worth and perception of what is real. “When you’re black and blue, you can point to the bruises and you can say ‘This happened to me,’” Dr. Robin Stern, associate director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, told TODAY. “But when somebody is undermining your reality and you simply have this feeling that there’s something wrong … women moreso than men, but men too, tend to point their fingers at themselves and say, ‘I did something wrong.’” Nearly half of all women and men in the U.S. said they’ve been subjected to psychological aggression by an intimate partner, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How couples can spot warning signs of domestic abuse OCT. 3, 201906:42 […]

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How To Care For Yourself When Dealing With Difficult People

By Dana BelletiereLast updated: 3 Oct 2019~ One of my friends tells her story of growing up with a mother with “issues” rather matter-of-factly, but the details are pretty grim to listen to. “She would stop talking to me for no reason, for days at a time, and put a gift on my bed when she decided she was done being mad at me. We never talked about why she was angry, and most of the time I didn’t know. I just knew not to talk to her until she left something on my bed, and then I’d hold my breath until the next time she got upset about something.”  My friend’s mother sometimes disappeared for lengths of time without anyone knowing where she went or when (or if) she would return. When she fought with my friend’s father, she frequently brought my friend into the arguments as a mediator, despite her being a child. “Everything was about her,” my friend says. “Even as an adult, forty years later, everything is still about her.” Whether we are born into families with difficult people, or enter into relationships with them as friends, coworkers, partners, etcetera, it can be challenge to know how to best respond to someone who is emotionally unwell. In order to do so effectively, it is paramount that we understand that the behaviors that are being presented are not our fault, develop firm and clear boundaries about what we will and will […]

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Gluten-Free Salmon with Lime and Sesame Seeds Great for Holidays

Gluten-Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD with Susie Flaherty   Ingredients: 1 1/2 to 2 pounds salmon (wild-caught preferred with skin on) Juice from 2-3 limes Olive Oil Sesame Seeds Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper and coat very lightly with olive oil. Place salmon, skin side down, on parchment paper in the pan. Squees the juice of 2-3 limes into a bowl. Use a pastry brush to coat salmon with lime juice. Coat the top of the salmon with sesame seeds. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. Be careful to not overcook.  

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#Art Through Pain #KNOWvember

Dear pain warriors,Each November, U.S. Pain Foundation organizes a month-long educational campaign for the pain community. Recognizing that art and writing can help kids and adults cope with and/or express chronic pain and its effects on their lives, this year’s KNOWvember campaign will focus on creativity.During the month, titled “Art through Pain: How Creativity Helps Us Cope,” U.S. Pain will be:hosting three virtual events, soliciting visual art submissions to showcase at a later date,and highlighting information about art and pain on social media (#ArtThroughPain).If you’d like to submit your artwork, you have the option of sharing it with us privately or allowing us to use it in a future project (such as in a blog post on Remedy or an INvisible Project magazine) through the link below. Submit your artwork >>

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The Flower of Purpose —Guest Blogger Shedding Light on Mental Health

Five years ago I began a friendship with my friend H.Dale who was incarcerated because of a psychotic episode. We began exchanging letters. Since that time I have come to know him as a brilliant young man who like many of us got blind sided by a serious mental illness. Unless you’re the one who […] The Flower of Purpose — Shedding Light on Mental Health

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Agoraphobia, Dreams, Trauma and EMDR

In post https://lookingforthelight.blog/2019/07/22/agoraphobia-is-not-logical/ ,‎ I forgot to mention the nightmares that have haunted me and I believe reinforce my agoraphobia. Every dream is based on not being able to get out or leave where I am. Examples, can’t find keys, don’t know what exit to take from store, cars covered in snow, not sure which one is mine. I also dream I’m flying, which I have for a long time, new to my dreams are not being able to see or only seeing a small amount. I’m not real deep into dream interpretation but from what I’ve read the deffinitions could fit. Flying is generally a good sign however it could mean you are fleeing something. Being blind is not wanting to see or face what is before you. I can’t help but think these dreams are aggrevating my agroraphobia and anxiety. Saturday I woke up and during the dream I could not find my car because it was snowed under, then I was flying in a part of town that is an hour away from where I live yet I was trying to get home. Next in the dream I’m in an expensive business suit and enter an auditorium, I’m nervious someone will think I have money and try to rob me so I’m shoving my purse into my breifcase. Then I find and pay phone and fumble for change and someone is standing in my way and won’t move […]

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Here’s the truth about CBD, from a cannabis researcher

IDEAS.TED.COM Sep 23, 2019 / Jeffrey Chen, MD Is CBD a cure-all — or snake oil? Jeffrey Chen, executive director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, explains the science behind the cannabis product. CBD gummies. CBD shots in your latte. CBD dog biscuits. From spas to drug stores, supermarkets to cafes, wherever you go in the US today, you’re likely to see products infused with CBD. There are cosmetics, vape pens, pills and, of course, the extract itself; there are even CBD-containing sexual lubricants for women which aim to reduce pelvic pain or enhance sensation. CBD has been hailed by some users as having cured their pain, anxiety, insomnia, depression or seizures, and it’s been touted by advertisers as a supplement that can treat all of the above and combat aging and chronic disease. As Executive Director of the UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, I’m dedicated to unearthing the scientific truth — the good and the bad — behind cannabis and CBD. My interest was sparked in 2014 when I was a medical student at UCLA, and I discovered a parent successfully treating her child’s severe epilepsy with CBD. I was surprised and intrigued. Despite California legalizing medical cannabis in 1996, we weren’t taught anything about cannabis or CBD in med school. I did research and found other families and children like Charlotte Figi reporting success with CBD, and I knew it was something that needed to be investigated. I established Cannabis Research Initiative in the fall of 2017, and today we […]

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Why PTSD Is a Mental Injury, Not a Mental Illness

Psychology Today Posted Sep 23, 2019 Tracy S. Hutchinson, Ph.D. New research suggests that PTSD is a normal response to common life events.   According to the National Institute of Mental Health, 7.7 million adults suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Along with a surge of awareness regarding PTSD, there are also many misconceptions. For example, some believe it is only associated with war veterans, events such as 9/11, or natural disasters. Although this diagnosis has historically been associated with military veterans who undergo multiple deployments, there are many other events that can trigger symptoms of PTSD. For example, prolonged exposure to emotional and psychological abuse (e.g., verbally abusive relationships, alcoholism, or stressful childhoods) are risk factors for developing symptoms. Some of these lingering misconceptions may be due to the fact that development and recognition of the disorder is relatively recent and has really only blossomed in the last three decades. History In 1980, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) formally recognized PTSD as an actual mental health diagnosis. Historically, it had been formally recognized as “shell shock” and was thought only to occur in military war veterans. Further, PTSD had historically been thought of as something that someone “gets over” over time. This may be true for some, but it isn’t for others. Researchers continue to discover risk factors that can cause PTSD symptoms. This includes emerging research on the study of what happens in childhood and how it affects adults in their lifetime (van Der Kolk, 2014). For example, some of my clients […]

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You Left Your Job Because of Sexual Harassment. What Now?

OCT 04, 2019 Some victims of workplace sexual harassment are reluctant to report what happened because they fear the effect on their career. For those who leave their job after experiencing harassment or assault, it can be hard to know how to approach a new job search, application, or interview process. “It’s a challenging issue. It’s a difficult scenario that more and more people are being placed in. The main thing is to remember you’re not to blame and this situation doesn’t define you,” says Pete Church, a member of RAINN’s National Leadership Council and Chief Human Resources Officer at Avangrid, a leading sustainable energy company that operates in 24 states. What to do during your search  “If your goal is to assess how a potential employer understands and addresses harassment in the work environment, then there’s a lot of helpful research you can do before you’re in an interview,” Church suggests. He also recommends going on Glassdoor and reading reviews of the company. Even if you don’t see specific mentions of sexual harassment in the reviews, you can learn about the company culture. It can also be helpful to find past employees of a company you’re interested in on LinkedIn. You can reach out for a networking phone call to ask about what their experience was like, about the company culture, and if you feel comfortable doing so, why they left the organization. Approach the situation optimistically and know […]

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The bias of mental illness — Guest Blogger Shedding Light on Mental Health

When I ask a group of participants to think of all the words associated with someone who has mental illness here’s what I get: crazy, looney, nuts, attention seeking, dangerous, violent, etc. Then I ask the question what are words you hear about a cancer survivor. Those words are: hero, warrior, brave, strong, etc. Then […] The bias of mental illness — Shedding Light on Mental Health

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Keep Speaking Out About Pain

Keep speaking out.My personal path into patient advocacy began with speaking at conferences about my struggle with complex regional pain syndrome, and, then, writing a book about it. But I know first-hand that speaking up isn’t easy–it can leave you feeling vulnerable and exposed, and it requires your already-limited energy and time. That’s why I’m so grateful to each pain warrior […]

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Lyme Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond

 Dear Subscriber, There are a number of things that can block your recovery from Lyme disease. If you have been on antibiotics for six to nine months and you are not getting better, there are additional steps to take. In Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond I describe how to move your treatment forward. In my Seattle practice, I discovered ways to move the treatments forward of my patients. In Treatment Stuck? Try These Steps at Six Months and Beyond I describe my formula. Read and watch this article to see if effective treatments are right for you. In Health, Marty Ross MD Read or Watch NowSpread the Word!  ShareTweetForwardQuality Matters. You can find the various supplements I use effectively in my Seattle practice at Marty Ross MD Supplements. Look Now

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What are Glutens and how to start a Gluten-Free Lifestyle

It’s important to understand what glutens are and where to look for in order to establish a gluten-free lifestyle. As more people are diagnosed gluten intolerant more pre-made products will become available making choices much easier. I plan to write a number of post on the Gluten-Free lifestyle in the coming months. Below is a short list of items and ingredients you can eat. The Information is taken from Gluten Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD. Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School.  Melinda Gluten is found in common foods such as breads, cereals, baked goods, and pasta. Because it’s used in processed foods as an additive or preservative, gluten is also found in a wide variety of foods and nonfood items from prescription medications to Play-Doh. If you are the food shopper in the family, you must learn to read labels very carefully to comply with gluten-free diet. Things you can eat on the Gluten-Free Diet Gluten-Free Grains, Flours, Seeds and Starches Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Cassava Corn Flaxseed Nut Flours Millet Montina Gluten-Free Oats Quinoa Rice Sago Sorghum Tapioca Teff Wild rice Safe Ingredients List  Vinegar except malt vinegar  Distilled alcohol Carmel color Citric acid Spices Monosodium glutamate Maltodextrin Mono- and diglycerides Artificial flavor and color Natural flavor and color 

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Remembering Mom Part 3 – How to Help Your Dementia Loved One — Guest Blogger Hindsight: My Journey

Realizing your parent or any loved one may have dementia is a tough one. I live with the regretful feeling that I should have recognized it sooner. At the time I was absorbed with my own life drama, but that’s no excuse. My hope is that what I learned as a daughter, observer and eventual […] Remembering Mom Part 3 – How to Help Your Dementia Loved One — Hindsight: My Journey

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Billie Eilish opens up about mental health: ‘I didn’t think that I would even make it’ to 17

Charles Trepany, USA TODAYPublished 10:22 a.m. ET Sept. 5, 2019 Billie Eilish is getting real on her mental health. The “Bury a Friend” songstress confessed in her cover story for Elle magazine that, despite early career success, she hasn’t always been happy.  “Two years ago, I felt like nothing mattered; every single thing was pointless,” she said in the article published Thursday. “Not just in my life, but everything in the whole world. I was fully clinically depressed. It’s insane to look back and not be anymore.” Eilish has been accused by trolls of faking her depression, which she admitted have been painful to read. “It hurt me to see that,” she said. “I was a 16-year-old girl who was really unstable. I’m in the happiest place of my life, and I didn’t think that I would even make it to this age.” More: Billie Eilish, 17, rips Nylon Germany for topless cover: I ‘did not consent in any way’ The 17-year-old said her mental health has since improved, calling happiness a “crazy” feeling. “I haven’t been happy for years,” she said. “I didn’t think I would be happy again. And here I am—I’ve gotten to a point where I’m finally okay. It’s not because I’m famous. It’s not because I have a little more money. It’s so many different things: growing up, people coming into your life, certain people leaving your life.” More: Believe the hype: Billie Eilish proves she’s a once-in-a-generation talent at NYC concert The singer added […]

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We Don’t Talk Much About Debt and Depression. This Blogger Is Changing That

Melanie Lockert remembers checking the traffic for her blog, Dear Debt, and feeling shocked at the results. Someone had found her site by searching, “I want to kill myself because of debt.” Lockert started Dear Debt in January 2013 after spending the previous year feeling depressed about her student loans. She posted monthly updates about her efforts to pay off […]

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Did Daddy know he was “Crazy”

My father committed suicide in 1992, put a shot-gun in his mouth. I was 28 years old, we were estranged since I was a teen. A trigger hit me like a hurricane this week. I’m having memories, not the worst. You put the the pressure on my shoulders to arrange everything, who to call. I had to face the chore of the house, a man living out of touch for many years. Worst was going to morgue, hand me original note and his bloody shotgun. Could you not see your friends were different? They were thieves but not in the same universe. They all took advantage of you, move in move out and steal what they want. One roommate committed suicide with your gun in your house. Down on their luck, will make payments on car, he was lucky to get three payments. He would have to track down and repo the car. They would come back begging and he would do it again. His friends were people at the bar he parked cars at. All the ladies got special attention, my father walked the lot to make sure the cars were secure. They all flirted with him, fake flirting, trashy bar, easy women going to bar in the hood looking for love. One night feeling the black dog, I went to the bar where my father parked cars. We played a game of pool, sitting at the bar he […]

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Camila Cabello just shared the simple self-help technique she uses to overcome her anxiety

People Posted byChristobel Hastings Published16 days ago Camila Cabello is no stranger to speaking out about her mental healthstruggles, and in a bid to raise awareness of the effects of anxiety, the singer shared the self-help technique she turns to when she’s feeling overwhelmed by the chaos of everyday life. In an age when our perception of the world is so often viewed through a heavily filtered lens, it can be tough to keep a cultivate a positive self-image. But despite the heavily-filtered images and aspirational messages we consume on our social media feeds, more and more celebrities are taking steps to break through the illusion of perfection and present a more nuanced reality. One star leading the way when it comes to disrupting the narrative is Camila Cabello. The singer is no stranger to speaking out about her struggles with mental health, and in a candid note to her followers last month, she opened up about her experiences with anxiety, and the ways she’s learned to cope with being “incredibly nervous” and “socially anxious.” This time around the Señorita singer is continuing her mental health conversation by sharing the coping mechanism she turns to when she’s feeling overwhelmed: breathing exercises. Taking to Instagram, the singer posted a long note to her followers acknowledging that she has the power to influence positive change in people’s lives through her social media platform, even if in “small ways.” “To anyone on here who is struggling, which we all do […]

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Let’s Talk About Pain

Dear pain warriors, At U.S. Pain Foundation, we deeply believe in the power of sharing patient stories. Talking about our experiences with pain helps us to educate others, to create change, and to offer hope. That’s why our theme for Pain Awareness Month 2019, which begins Sunday, is #LetsTalkAboutPain.I first got involved in patient advocacy by writing a book about my experiences with complex regional pain syndrome. It enabled me to process my personal journey, take control of my story, and help create awareness for those like me. I hope speaking up about pain this September can do the same for you. This year, we have dozens of opportunities for you to help bring pain to the forefront of public conversations, ranging from our daily storyathon to social media giveaways to weekly events.All of these activities are presented in collaboration with our generous sponsor, Thrive Tape, the creator of an innovative, far-infrared kinesiology tape for all types of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. (We encourage you to check them out! Use the code USPAIN for a discount.)How you can participateWe have something for everyone! Most activities are online, which means you can take part from the comfort of your home. Storyathon. Each day in September, U.S. Pain will be sharing a video story of a real person living with pain. These individuals–from all walks of life–bravely submitted their personal stories in August to help create awareness. To watch the videos, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Missed the video storyathon deadline? Share […]

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The Simple Guide to Value Triggers

Psychology Today   How to live by your highest ideals. Posted Aug 11, 2019 Steven C. Hayes Ph.D. Get Out of Your Mind Source: Pixabay/CC Being in touch with your values is essential to living a rich and meaningful life. By knowing what you care about most, you become inspired to live by your highest ideals, bringing out the best in yourself. In short, values help you find direction, meaning, and inspiration in life. Unfortunately, however, it’s more complicated than this. Because too often enough, we get sidetracked. Too often, the demands of the day pull our attention away from what really matters, to serve our immediate emotional needs. We then lose touch of our ideals, and revert back to old – often destructive – habits. If you wish to stop this from happening, break the cycle of bad habits, and bring forth the best of yourself, you have to reconnect with your values whenever you lose touch. And the easiest way to accomplish this, are value triggers. What Are Value Triggers? A value trigger is a physical reminder of your core values. By merely looking at it, you refocus back on what matters most, making you act more in line with your highest ideals. The trigger can be almost anything, as long as it makes you remember your values. Here are a few ideas: Card in Wallet. Write down a few core values on an index card, and put it in your […]

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My Lyme Data Chart Book

How many participants in the MyLymeData patient registry ever had a Lyme-related rash? (34%) How many initially presented with flu-like symptoms? (64%) How many were misdiagnosed with a psychiatric illness? (54%) These are some of the details you can learn in the MyLymeData 2019 Chart Book. This report is a compilation of our research results based on more than 2.5 […]

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23andMe Explores Dietary Habit and Health Outcomes

August 6, 2019 By 23andMe under 23andMe Research By Rafaela Bagur Quetglas, PhD You are what you eat, is the old adage, but what does your diet actually say about you?  23andMe has a unique opportunity to explore that question, as we investigate how dietary habits, along with genetics, demographics, lifestyle and other data can influence overall health outcomes. Looking at diet specifically, our scientists analyzed the data of more than 850,000 people who consented to participate in research and who shared details about their own eating habits.  Using machine learning techniques* we were able to see that dietary choices clustered into four distinct types of eaters, which were mainly characterized by two dietary behaviors. The first one represents the spectrum of foods’ nutrient content from high nutrient-dense foods (i.e. low caloric foods with high nutrient content like vegetables, leafy greens, fruit, beans or whole-grains) to low nutrient-dense foods (i.e. high caloric foods with low nutrient content like. processed foods, sweets, sodas, pastries, saturated fats or  fast food). The second main behavior differentiating diet groups is the meat intake, in particular, red and processed meat (e.g., sausages, hot dogs, ham, or cured bacon).   Dietary Types Using these two behaviors as axes, we can plot the four main diet groups:  On one end, we find people who eat high nutrient-dense (HND) foods like  vegetables, leafy greens and fruits and tend to avoid high caloric foods with low nutrient content like refined carbs, processed foods, saturated […]

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Natural Seasonal Allergy Relief

Willow & Sage by Stampington By Kaetlyn Kennedy   Nettle Leaf Tea Made from stinging nettle plants, organic nettle tea can help relieve seasonal allergy symptoms with it’s natural antihistamine. You reap all the benefits of antihistamine symptom relief without having to take conventional medicines. You can drink the daily as a preventative or as needed.   Spirulina & Other […]

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Bring Change to Mind Partners with Mental Health for US

 Bring Change to Mind is excited to announce that we have partnered with Mental Health for US, a nonpartisan educational initiative focused on elevating mental health and addiction in policy conversations by empowering grassroots advocates and improving candidate and policymaker health literacy. The initiative is powered by a coalition of stakeholder groups from around the country dedicated to uniting the American people to make systemic, long-term change with civic engagement tools and resources.  The movement launched at The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s 10th Annual Advocacy Forum by former U.S. Representative and co-chair of the Mental Health for US initiative Patrick J. Kennedy (D-R.I.). Former U.S. Senator Gordon H. Smith (R-OR), a long-time mental health advocate, will also serve as co-chair. “The suicide rate has skyrocketed over the past 20 years because mental health and substance use disorders often go undetected and undertreated,” said Sen. Smith. “Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in America. Now more than ever, we need our government leaders to stand up and champion systemic change. We have to make our voices heard.”  Join us in building this movement of change!   Learn More About Mental Health for Us 

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What are Glutens and how to start a Gluten-Free Lifestyle

It’s important to understand what glutens are and where to look for in order to establish a gluten-free lifestyle. As more people are diagnosed gluten intolerant more pre-made products will become available making choices much easier. I plan to write a number of post on the Gluten-Free lifestyle in the coming months. Below is a short list of items and ingredients you can eat. The Information is taken from Gluten Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD. Founder and Director of the Center for Celiac Research at Massachusetts General Hospital Harvard Medical School.  Melinda Gluten is found in common foods such as breads, cereals, baked goods, and pasta. Because it’s used in processed foods as an additive or preservative, gluten is also found in a wide variety of foods and nonfood items from prescription medications to Play-Doh. If you are the food shopper in the family, you must learn to read labels very carefully to comply with gluten-free diet. Things you can eat on the Gluten-Free Diet Gluten-Free Grains, Flours, Seeds and Starches Amaranth Arrowroot Buckwheat Cassava Corn Flaxseed Nut Flours Millet Montina Gluten-Free Oats Quinoa Rice Sago Sorghum Tapioca Teff Wild rice Safe Ingredients List  Vinegar except malt vinegar  Distilled alcohol Carmel color Citric acid Spices Monosodium glutamate Maltodextrin Mono- and diglycerides Artificial flavor and color Natural flavor and color 

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Find Delight in Different Forms of Stillness

“Stillness” can sound sentimental but it’s what most of us long for. Psychology Today Posted Jul 29, 2019  Rick Hanson Ph.D. Your Wise Brain What is your sense of stillness? “Stillness or peace” may sound merely sentimental (“visualize whirled peas”). But deep down, it’s what most of us long for. Consider the proverb: The highest happiness is stillness. Not a stillness or […]

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Prevent unnecessary medical care — by asking your doctor these 4 questions first

TED TALKS Jul 22, 2019 / Daryl Chen Justin Tran By raising questions and taking on a more active role in decision making, patients can do their part to avoid needless medications, tests, treatments or procedures, says neurosurgeon Christer Mjåset. This post is part of TED’s “How to Be a Better Human” series, each of which contains a piece of helpful advice […]

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Mini Me Health Update

My Parathyroid surgery was July 8th and I’m healing nicely. The surgeon found quite a surprise, I had five Parathyroids instead of four. She said it was rare. I hope that translates to feeling all the better. She is getting my calcium levels adjusted and it was painful in the beginning with cramping legs and numb fingers. It’s not what […]

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How Grief Shows Up In Your Body

WEB MD By Stephanie Hairston July 11, 2019 — It’s surprising how physical grief can be. Your heart literally aches. A memory comes up that causes your stomach to clench or a chill to run down your spine. Some nights, your mind races, and your heart races along with it, your body so electrified with energy that you can barely sleep. Other nights, you’re so tired that you fall asleep right away. You wake up the next morning still feeling exhausted and spend most of the day in bed. Amy Davis, a 32-year-old from Bristol, TN, became sick with grief after losing Molly, a close 38-year-old family member, to cancer. “Early grief was intensely physical for me,” Davis says. “After the shock and adrenaline of the first weeks wore off, I went through a couple of months of extreme fatigue, with nausea, headaches, food aversion, mixed-up sleep cycles, dizziness, and sun sensitivity. It was extremely difficult to do anything. … If there’s one thing I want people to know about grief, it’s how awful it can make your body feel.” What causes these physical symptoms? A range of studies reveal the powerful effects grief can have on the body. Grief increases inflammation, which can worsen health problems you already have and cause new ones. It batters the immune system, leaving you depleted and vulnerable to infection. The heartbreak of grief can increase blood pressure and the risk of blood clots. Intense grief can alter the […]

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Agrophobia Is Not Logical

Whatever this obstacle is, it started 18 months ago, there wasn’t a moment I can pin this inability on. Inability is the right word, I’m not afraid to leave the house, I’ve driven a few times in the past year, I know how to drive and live in the same town. Yet I have my husband take me to all […]

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Natural Seasonal Allergy Relief

Willow & Sage by Stampington By Kaetlyn Kennedy   Nettle Leaf Tea Made from stinging nettle plants, organic nettle tea can help relieve seasonal allergy symptoms with it’s natural antihistamine. You reap all the benefits of antihistamine symptom relief without having to take conventional medicines. You can drink the daily as a preventative or as needed.   Spirulina & Other […]

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Dementia Thoughts

Dementia sucks, it’s fucking life sucking. I watched my granny die from Dementia, you don’t wish that type of death on anyone. Once she no longer knew who she or anyone else was it was crushing. I don’t want to die that way and have been vocal about it to the surprise of my husband, Therapist and Psychiatrist. My decision […]

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Why Do Women Get More Migraines than Men?

National Migraine Institute Posted on August 27, 2018 by Staff Researchers have found a potential mechanism for migraine that may explain why women get more migraines than men. The study, in Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences, suggests that sex hormones affect cells around the trigeminal nerve and connected blood vessels in the head.  They found that estrogens, which are at their highest levels in women of reproductive age, are particularly important for sensitizing these cells to migraine triggers. “We can observe significant differences in our experimental migraine model between males and females and are trying to understand the molecular correlates responsible for these differences,” explains Professor Antonio Ferrer-Montiel from the Universitas Miguel Hernández, Spain. “Although this is a complex process, we believe that modulation of the trigeminovascular system by sex hormones plays an important role that has not been properly addressed.” Ferrer-Montiel and his team reviewed decades of literature on sex hormones, migraine sensitivity and cells’ responses to migraine triggers to identify the role of specific hormones. Some (like testosterone) seem to protect against migraines, while others (like prolactin) appear to make migraines worse. They do this by making the cells’ ion channels, which control the cells’ reactions to outside stimuli, more or less vulnerable to migraine triggers. Some hormones need much more research to determine their role. Estrogen, however, stands out as a key candidate for understanding migraine occurrence. It was first identified as a factor by the greater prevalence of migraine in menstruating […]

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Caregiver 101 Tips I Missed

Reblogged from 2009 I care for my 92-year-old gramps and have been here five weeks. He had three surgeries in seven days. Without Caregiving 101 training, I learned the hard way. *Ask the doctor what happens if the  procedure does not work. *If a second procedure does not work, is there a third option. *What is the recovery time and type of […]

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Chronic Pain: Swimming Therapy

  Most people don’t think of Mental Illness when discussing Chronic Pain. Mental Illness can be physically debilitating with many spending large amounts of time in bed. For someone like me who is challenged by both, daily life can be difficult. Today I’m in bed juggling my laptop on one knee trying to avoid the pain screaming on the left […]

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Pain Warriors

As Ambassador for U.S. Pain Foundation I want to share the latest news on a meeting offered by U.S. Pain Foundation and Coilition for Headache and Migranes Patients. Melinda Sandor Ambassador-Texas U.S. Pain Foundation. Dear pain warriors, Those with chronic pain, including migraine and headache disorders, can have an especially tough time finding a doctor they click with. Have you ever wanted to find a way to better communicate with your doctor, get the most out of your visits, and maximize your treatment plan?If yes, please join us this Thursday, June 13, at 7 pm ESTfor an intimate conversation between neurologist and headache specialist Abby Chua, DO, and patient advocate Katie Golden. Dr. Chua and Katie will discuss what patients and doctors can learn from one another, and offer tips for interacting.Dr. Chua is a headache specialist at Hartford HealthCare Headache Center in Connecticut. She also is program director of their Headache and Facial Pain Fellowship Program, one of the few such programs in the country. Dr. Chua brings a special level of compassion to her practice as a person living with vestibular migraine, and advocates tirelessly on behalf of patients. Katie lives with chronic migraine disease, and has emerged as a leading voice for the patient community. She is the Migraine Advocacy Liaison for U.S. Pain Foundation and a member of the steering committee for CHAMP. She was the recipient of the Impact Award 2017 for the Association of Migraine Disorders and writes […]

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This NBA Superstar Used 2 (Surprising) Words to Teach a Valuable Lesson in Emotional Intelligence

By Justin BarisoFounder, Insight It’s rare for professional athletes to admit weakness. It’s even rarer for them to do this. As the Toronto Raptors and Golden State Warriors continue their slugfest to determine the NBA’s 2019 champion, one player is already preparing for next season: The Milwaukee Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo. Not that long ago it appeared that Antetokounmpo and the Bucks would be playing the Warriors for this year’s championship. The Bucks had cruised through the playoffs, and were up two games to zero against the Toronto Raptors. But the Raptors went on to win the next four games in a row–a remarkable feat considering the Bucks hadn’t lost three games in a row the entire season. The Raptors managed to defeat the Bucks by tooling their defense to focus on stopping the young team’s star (who’s affectionately known as “the Greek Freak” due to his Athens upbringing and monstrous athletic prowess). In a recent interview with The Athletic, Antetokounmpo acknowledged that Raptors players Kawhi Leonard and Marc Gasol gave him particular trouble. Giannis admitted that now the series is over, “every day in his head,” he continues to see Gasol and Leonard coming at him. Then, Antetokounmpo went on to say something remarkable to his opponents: “Thank you. Thank you, because Gasol and Kawhi made me a better player. I’m not trying to be sarcastic. I’m being honest. They’re going to push me to be better.” “Thank you.” It’s rare for professional athletes to admit weakness or to credit opposing players for […]

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Blair Underwood: Ava Duvernay Made A Grief Counselor Available On The Set Of ‘When They See Us’

HelloBuzz Shamika Sanders, Sr. Entertainment Editor Posted May 31, 2019 Ava Duvernay was just a teenager when five young Black boys, from Harlem, were arrested and convicted for the rape of a white woman in Central Park on the night of April 19, 1989. So when Raymond Santana, one of the “Central Park 5” sent her a wishful tweet about bringing the Central Park 5 story to the screen, “it meant a lot” to her, she revealed to NPR. Ava and Netflix’s When They See Us chronicles the events of the Central Park Five case that captivated the nation. The four-part series will span 25 years, taking on the wrongful conviction of the boys, as well as highlight their exoneration in 2002 and the settlement reached with the city of New York in 2014. Antron McCray, Yusef Salaam, Raymond Santana, Jr., Kevin Richardson and Korey Wise were beaten upon arrest, forced into making false confessions and convicted of a crime they did not commit. They served between seven and 13 years in prison and were later exonerated only to have a convicted murderer, who was serving a life sentence, eventually confess to the crime. Their story is perfectly aligned with Duvernay’s mission to raise awareness around the injustices of the prison industrial system, which she explored in her critically acclaimed documentary the 13th. When They See Us stars a stellar cast Michael K. Williams, John Leguizamo, Niecy Nash and Blair Underwood, who opened up to us about this role […]

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23andMe Scientist to Present Data on the Genetics of Type 2 Diabetes at American Diabetes Association Conference

June 3, 2019 By 23andMe under 23andMe Research, Education By Eloycsia Ratliff, MPH, 23andMe Medical Education Project Manager We know that diet and exercise play an important role in a person’s likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes, but what role does genetics play? That’s a question 23andMe researchers have been investigating, and at a meeting of the American Diabetes Associations (ADA) Annual Conference on June […]

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Maisie Williams on how ‘Game of Thrones’ stardom impacted on her mental health

Nick Reilly May 16, 2019 10:13 am BST Read more at https://www.nme.com/news/tv/maisie-williams-says-game-of-thrones-stardom-affected-her-mental-health-2488647#ZzzRIZF429jpTWLX.99 “You can just sit in a hole of sadness” Game of Thrones actress Maisie Williams has explained how finding fame on the hit show adversely affected her mental health. The actress, who has drawn widespread acclaim for her portrayal of Arya Stark, told Fearne Cotton’s Happy Place podcast how it was tricky to navigate fame as a teenager. The star was just 13-years-old when she was cast in the role and said that she often became overwhelmed by negative comments on social media. “It gets to a point where you’re almost craving something negative, so you can just sit in a hole of sadness,” Williams said. While Williams now gives less attention to negative thoughts, she admits that she still considers how they affected her. Maisie Williams as Arya Stark ” I still lie in bed at, like, 11 o’clock at night telling myself all the things I hate about myself,” Williams said. “It’s just really terrifying that you’re ever going to slip back into it. That’s still something that I’m really working on, because I think that’s really hard. It’s really hard to feel sad and not feel completely defeated by it.” Describing her desire for a “normal life” after the show ends on Sunday, Williams admitted: “I don’t want any of this crazy, crazy world because it’s not worth it.” READ MORE: ‘Game of Thrones’ season 8 episode 5 review: Did Daenerys just jump […]

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America’s Mental Health Crisis-Bring Change to Mind

Bring Change To Mind Washington Post Live     Last week, our Co-Founder Glenn Close spent the day on Capitol Hill at the invitation of U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) to advocate for Stabenow’s Excellence in Mental Health and Addiction Treatment Expansion Act.This legislation would renew and expand funding for clinics that provide a comprehensive set of mental health and addiction treatment services. Glenn started the day with a Washington Post Live event on mental health and the addiction crisis and participated in a number of meetings with House and Senate leaders throughout the rest of the day.Photo: BC2M Co-Founder Glenn Close, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (R-MO), and U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI).  Learn More

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