Anesthesia for Chronic Pain?

 

Ketamine is an anesthesia used since the 1960s and has since been proven to work for Chronic Pain and Mental Illness. My pain levels have been through the roof and walking the last 15 days has been difficult. I made the decision to try something radically different. I had my first Ketamine treatment was yesterday.

I  read about the LSD effect of Ketamine, this helped me prepare. First, it’s been ages since I’ve done LSD (Acid) and one experience was not pleasant at all. If you’ve not taken LSD you may keep a couple of things in mind.

I wasn’t afraid but started to get nervous as we arrived, I started preparing for this out of body experience. I ask the doctor to include anxiety medicine, the last thing I wanted was a panic attack.

You lay on a table in the patient room, bring your own pillow if you like. That was the worst part of the treatment, those little pillows doubled over. You are in full control of your limbs but maybe be a slower response, the medicine starts to work immediately and you may feel nausea.

Many people go to sleep or half-sleep at this point. I wanted to feel the entire “trip”, the anesthesiologist said if you’re not tripping it’s not working. One of the most common experiences was feeling outside of my body. The people’s voice around me sounded amplified yet I couldn’t make out what they were saying.

I couldn’t get my earbuds to work, crap! I wanted to listen to 70’s Rock & Roll. Instead, I positioned my self sideways and looked outside at the streets. If I let myself there could have been a few anxious moments, I focused on breathing.

I was in a semi-numb state but could handle phone without dropping. Your mind is twisted and turning during the 1.5-hour treatment.

I’m ready to see how this treatment helps.

P.S. It’s hard to know how much the Ketamine treatment worked by itself since the doctor doubled my pain med and wrote a script for topical pain relief. I’ll keep you posted after my next treatment.

 

Medical information provided by Wikipedia.


Ketamine is a medication mainly used for starting and maintaining anesthesia.[18] It induces a trance-like state while providing pain reliefsedation, and memory loss.[19] Other uses include for chronic pain, sedation in intensive care, and depression.[20][21][13][22] Heart function, breathing, and airway reflexes generally remain functional.[19] Effects typically begin within five minutes when given by injection and last up to about 25 minutes.[18][23]

Common side effects include agitation, confusion, or hallucinations as the medication wears off.[24][18][24][25] Elevated blood pressure and muscle tremors are relatively common.[18][25]Spasms of the larynx may rarely occur.[18] Ketamine is an NMDA receptor antagonist, but it may also have other actions.[26]

Ketamine was discovered in 1962, first tested in humans in 1964, and was approved for use in the United States in 1970.[23][27] It was extensively used for surgical anesthesia in the Vietnam War due to its safety.[27] It is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[28] It is available as a generic medication.[18] The wholesale cost in the developing world is between US$0.84 and US$3.22 per vial.[29] Ketamine is also used as a recreational drug for its hallucinogeniceffects.[30]

See also: Esketamine § Depression

Ketamine has been found to be a rapid-acting antidepressant in depression.[13][49][50][51][52] It also may be effective in decreasing suicidal ideation, although based on lower quality evidence.[53][54][55] The antidepressant effects of ketamine were first shown in small studies in 2000 and 2006.[10] They have since been demonstrated and characterized in subsequent studies.[10] A single low, sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine given via intravenous infusion may produce antidepressant effects within four hours in people with depression.[10] These antidepressant effects may persist for up to several weeks following a single infusion.[10][56] This is in contrast to conventional antidepressants like selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), which generally require at least several weeks for their benefits to occur and become maximal.[10]Moreover, based on the available preliminary evidence, the magnitude of the antidepressant effects of ketamine appears to be more than double that of conventional antidepressants.[10]On the basis of these findings, a 2017 review described ketamine as the single most important advance in the treatment of depression in over 50 years.[56] It has sparked interest in NMDA receptor antagonists for depression, and has shifted the direction of antidepressant research and development.[57]

Ketamine has not been approved for use as an antidepressant, but its active enantiomeresketamine, has been.[57] Esketamine was developed as a nasal spray for treatment-resistant depression and is approved for use in the United States.[10] While there is evidence to support the effectiveness of ketamine in treating depression, there is a lack of consensus on optimal dosing and the effects and safety of long-term therapy.[52][58] Ketamine can produce euphoria and dissociative hallucinogen effects at higher doses, and thus has an abuse potential.[10][59] Moreover, ketamine has been associated with cognitive deficitsurotoxicityhepatotoxicity, and other complications in some individuals with long-term use.[10][59] These undesirable effects may serve to limit the use of ketamine for depression.[10][59] Dozens of “ketamine clinics” have opened across the United States, where intravenous ketamine is used off-label to treat people with depression.[60]


9 Comments »

  1. I’ve never tried acid so the closest I can get to thinking what this is like is heaps of IV morphine that I’ve had in hospitals. I remember ‘tripping’ then, even though I hadn’t realised that’s what was happening. Ketamine treatment is certainly an interesting one. An hour and a half, quite a decent time to be in there. As you say, it’s going to be hard to define exactly how much it helps given the change to your meds. After the tripping side of things wears off, off long do they anticipate pain-relief properties to last..? Keeping my fingers crossed for you! xx

    Liked by 1 person

    • You know I was so excited about getting the treatment I didn’t even ask about the time of relief. I have an appt. in a couple of weeks and I’ll learn more. It has helped for sure now, I didn’t even take my pain med last night. Your trip of morphine is the same out of body type experience. The trip stops the minute the drip is complete. I’ve had no adverse effects and will ask for another treatment in next appt. Hugs 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. What would worry me is where do you go from here? You have really bad chronic pain, i have no idea in what form your pain is. I think your very brave trying this.

    I am such a light weight with pain meds. I have more fear of taking pain meds then actually dealing with pain itself. It came down to 2 grandparents i think, 1 had chronic pain and parkinsons and the other had RA. They both lived on pain medication and eventually they both died over time from each other with the after affects of their pain medication. I suppose a young girl at the time i was very impressionable.

    I am bless with a high threshold of pain. I have fractured my coxic and refused morphine and went without pain meds. I rarely take pain meds in any disguise. I have MS and my nerve pain is 247 all the time the only relief is sleep.

    I have tried to take the pysch meds they give you for it, but they made me really sick. My only relief is one 2mg diazepam at night to help me settle back to sleep when i wake up in the night which I will do.

    I rarely even take a paracetamol lol. I know crazy or what. My fear is worse then my coping with pain. My family always know when i am beyond a level 10 when i have to take a paracetamol.

    I wish i wasnt so stupid i really do. But i am training my brain to block out the pain signals. I do other things and I try not to focus on the stuff going on and it does help me a lot. I kind of getting used to it to be honest. I have a blanket cage now in my bed which keeps the blankets off my body so the touch of them doesnt irritate me. I wear light clothing, and i never let myself get over heated.

    I do find stress and anxiety makes the pain worse, so i have cut out most of the stress. the hardest time was when my husband died i was in so much i could have died with it.

    I am i suppose lucky as i dont have RA or arthritis or any bone jarring diseases that give you awful pain all the time, its a different pain to mine.

    I think you are very brave to try knew things in order for you to have a good day. I hope it works for you.

    xxxxxxxxxx oh and music calms me too.

    Living in the UK I doubt we would ever get given anesthesia for CP to be honest we cant even get given sativex which is a derivative from cannabis with the real stuff taken out lol. we are just handed out the same old things that are really not good for us.

    my brother was put on naproxen now he is told to get off it as its screwing up his kidneys.

    Nah in the UK you go to a pain clinic and they look at you and say, well you have MS and all i can offer you is pysch drugs which are designed to turn you into a zombie, then you find that 2 of them they were handing out like sweets have been declassified as Class A drugs and virtually impossible to get now unless you see your GP for a new prescription.

    my way forward is to read and learn all about pain and how to deal with it on my own, as i am not going to the support I need from my medical practice any day soon. xxx

    I hope you have a better day. xxxx

    Like

    • I have a high threshold for pain but decided there was no reason to live with more pain than needed. I also take pain meds and a sleeping med. The Ketamine treatment is very common is the US for pain. Things are very different in the UK and I understand getting meds or treatments takes a long time if you can get at all. I wish you luck with the natural method of dealing with pain. If your pain reaches the point of being to much, don’t torture yourself, take a med., you can take as long as you want. You control the possible addiction.

      Like

  3. thank you very much for this post…i was reading about LSD couple of days based on a post from a person in reddit who claims LSD stimulates a high, necessary to probe inner thoughts for gaining a higher spiritual experience. is it true?

    you have mentioned ” If you’ve not taken LSD you may keep a couple of things in mind.”. Please let me know them since i want people around me to be aware of the impact of substance abuse, they intend to take these because of their stressful lives. I don’t want them to get misleaded so that they could try it on their own..

    Liked by 1 person

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