Cervical Health Awareness Month

I believe Cervical Health Awareness Month is very important because I was diagnosed with Cervical Cancer at 28 years old. They first tried a semi-non-invasive procedure to remove cancer but it failed. I was waiting for my surgery when the doctor came in and said I have a high risk for Ovarian Cancer since my mother and grandmother both had Ovarian Cancer and hysterectomies at a young age.

The doctor recommended I do a full hysterectomy to be safe. I had minutes to decide if I wanted to take the risk or not be able to have kids. A full hysterectomy is what I went with, no more cancer for me.

The diagnosis came as a huge surprise and I had no symptoms. This is what makes education so important. You have to start when your kids are in their teens. You’ve seen the commercials on TV but may not pay attention.

 

You can lower your risk for cervical cancer by getting screened regularly, starting at age 21.

Screening Tests

The HPV test and the Pap test are screening tests that can help prevent cervical cancer or find it early.

  • The human papillomavirus (HPV) test looks for the virus that can cause cell changes on the cervix.
  • The Pap test (or Pap smear) looks for precancers,which are cell changes on the cervix that might become cervical cancer if they are not treated appropriately.

Screening Options

You should start getting Pap tests at age 21. If your Pap test result is normal, your doctor may tell you that you can wait three years until your next Pap test.

If you’re 30 to 65 years old, you have three options. Talk to your doctor about which testing option is right for you.

  • An HPV test only. If your result is normal, your doctor may tell you that you can wait five years until your next screening test.
  • An HPV test along with the Pap test. If both of your results are normal, your doctor may tell you that you can wait five years until your next screening test.
  • A Pap test only. If your result is normal, your doctor may tell you that you can wait three years until your next Pap test.

If you’re older than 65, your doctor may tell you that you don’t need to be screened anymore if you have had normal screening test results for several years and you have not had a cervical precancer in the past, or you have had your cervix removed as part of a total hysterectomy for non-cancerous conditions, like fibroids.

HPV Vaccine

The HPV vaccine protects against the types of HPV that most often cause cervical cancers. HPV can also cause other kinds of cancer in both men and women.

  • HPV vaccination is recommended for preteens aged 11 to 12 years, but can be given starting at age 9.
  • HPV vaccine also is recommended for everyone through age 26 years, if they are not vaccinated already.
  • HPV vaccination is not recommended for everyone older than age 26 years. However, some adults age 27 through 45 years who are not already vaccinated may decide to get the HPV vaccine after speaking with their doctor about their risk for new HPV infections and the possible benefits of vaccination. HPV vaccination in this age range provides less benefit, as more people have already been exposed to HPV.

HPV vaccination prevents new HPV infections but does not treat existing infections or diseases. This is why the HPV vaccine works best when given before any exposure to HPV. You should get screened for cervical cancer regularly, even if you received an HPV vaccine.

Get checked, your life may depend on it. Mine did.
Melinda
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