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Camille Pissarro​ One of My Favs

Originally posted on For the Love of Art:
It is strange that most of Camille Pissarro’s artwork I don’t care for. Landscapes, people working in fields, there all very nice but don’t have as much interest as Boulivorde Martmontre Avenue at Night, 1897. This piece draws me into all the different brush strokes, nothing clearly defined yet perfectly understand. I can feel the excitement of people bustling around on a brisk night. His use of reflections is the icing on the cake. Thank you for coming by to see on my favorite Impressionist/Post Impressionist artist Camille Pissarro. CAMILLE PISSARRO (July 10, 1830 – November 13, 1903) Camille Pissarro (July 10, 1830 – November 13, 1903) was a French Impressionist painter. His importance resides not only in his visual contributions to Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, but also in his patriarchal standing among his colleagues, particularly Paul Cezanne and Paul Gauguin. Jacob-Abraham-Camille Pissarro was born in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, to Abraham Gabriel Pissarro, a Portuguese Sephardic Jew, and Rachel Manzana-Pomie, from the Dominican Republic. Pissarro lived in St. Thomas until age 12, when he went to a boarding school in Paris. He returned to St. Thomas where he drew in his free time. Pissarro was attracted to political anarchy, an attraction that may have originated during his years in St. Thomas.

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Georgia O’Keeffe in North Carolina by da-AL — Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

What a great time my husband and I had visiting our dear friend David Hunt in North Carolina. He’s posted on Happiness Between Tails here and here. We hadn’t seen him in way too long — all the more reason that my recent discovery of the touching PBS series, “We’ll Meet Again,” gets me blubbering. […] via Georgia O’Keeffe in North Carolina by da-AL — Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

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Stream of Consciousness Saturday #SoSC

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “ends with -ly.” Start your post with any adverb that ends in “-ly.” Bonus points if you end with an adverb too. Have fun! Hardly the winter I expected, marching in so boldly. My dementia is bad today, had to look up adverb. Hope I hit the mark. Have a great weekend.  M   Join us for the fun and sharing good media stories   For more on the Stream of Consciousness Saturday, visit Linda Hill’s blog. Here’s the link: https://lindaghill.com/2019/01/18/the-friday-reminder-for-socs-jusjojan-2019-daily-prompt-jan-19th/ Here are the rules for SoCS: 1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write. 2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop. 3. There will be a prompt every week. I will post the prompt here on my blog on Friday, along with a reminder for you to join in. The prompt will be one random thing, but it will not be a subject. For instance, I will not say “Write about dogs”; the prompt will be more like, “Make your first sentence a question,” “Begin with the word ‘The’,” or simply a single word to get your started. 4. […]

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Fibro Friday: Hamster Wheel

Repost I’ve struggled with Chronic Lyme, Fibromyalgia, and Dementia for six years, every week it’s a follow-up or test for the latest ailment. I’ve made the decision to step off the Doctor Hamster Wheel in 2019. I saw a Rheumatologist two months ago, the clueless PA told me there wasn’t Lyme in Texas. REALLY? The doctor named a few possible illnesses and took my blood. The doctor’s visit was a bust but the lab work revealed my Calcium is high. Which can cause serious complications? She suggested having my Parathyroid checked. WOW, something came out of the lab work, I have another ailment to deal with! I saw the Endocrinologist, it was straight forward. A blood test, a scan at the hospital and possible surgery. We scheduled the scan immediately since it was affecting my heart. I fell down the stairs and banged myself up a good one. I landed a perfect 10! NO, I can’t lean my head back for two forty-five minute sessions. The test was rescheduled. 2019 is starting like the other six years, with a heart test scheduled, a Parathyroid scan with possible surgery, and a test for Traumatic Brain Injury from the fall. There are a few days left in 2018, I want to know who I am, how have I changed in that time. I developed Agoraphobia, haven’t driven in six years and have only seen the inside of doctor’s offices. I took the first step […]

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Today in History February 6th

1812 Earthquake causes Mississippi River to flow backwards The last of four massive earthquakes that began the previous December strikes in what will be the state of Missouri with a force strong enough to spawn a fluvial tsunami, causing the mighty Mississippi River to run backwards for many hours.   1935 Beloved board game Monopoly debuts Parker Brothers begins selling […]

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Celebrity Friday Quotes

“Too many people are buying things they can’t afford, with money that they don’t have… to impress people that they don’t like!” Nothing to do w/ “books” — Just like the quote!” ― Will Smith   “I don’t like to share my personal life… it wouldn’t be personal if I shared it.” ― George Clooney   “What’s the whole point […]

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[Wellness Wednesday] The Importance Of Lifelong Learning — Reclaiming HOPE

Welcome back to Wellness Wednesday everyone! This week I thought we could talk a little about the importance of continuing to learn throughout our lives. Sometimes we tend to think of learning only in the context of formal education, but the truth is that more learning takes place outside of the classroom than it does […] via [Wellness Wednesday] The Importance Of Lifelong Learning — Reclaiming HOPE

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Diversity Matters in Research

By 23andMe on Fri, 01 Feb 2019 17:49:06 Africans and African Americans are among the most underrepresented populations in genetic health research, yet they face some of the most daunting health outcomes.   It’s a bitter irony of the current state of research that among those most in need are the least served by our ever-expanding genetic knowledge. Africans, African Americans, as well as Latinos, still make up less than four percent of individuals included in genome-wide association studies, according to a recent study. Genetic Diversity This despite the fact that Africans and people of African ancestry are more genetically diverse than all other populations in the world combined. This is because humans originated in Africa and have lived there continuously for more than 200,000 years, adapting to the varied climates and regions. The rest of the world was populated by small groups of people who first migrated out of Africa some 60,000 to 130,000 years ago. In genetics this is called the Founder Effect. Including people of African ancestry in genetic study will likely uncover unique genetic variation that help scientists better understand conditions that affect people of African ancestry, who thus far have not benefited from many of the breakthroughs in genetic science. Yielding Results 23andMe’s efforts to improve diversity in its research has yielded results. The most promising is that we now have one of the largest groups, if not the largest, group of African Americans who […]

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Bloques de carreteras en la vida

Todos golpeamos las carreteras en la vida, algunas semanas duraderas, otros años. Para sobrevivir a la paliza que tiene que permanecer centrado en los pasos hacia adelante, incluso los pasos nano están avanzando. Tuve la suerte, el abuso, el trauma y el odio propio comenzaron cuando era muy joven. Crecí oyendo lo estúpido que me convencí de que era verdad. […]

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When a Patient Dies by Suicide — The Physician’s Silent Sorrow

New England Journal of Medicine January 24, 2019 Dinah Miller, M.D. We talk about the toll suicide takes on families and the tragedy for the people who’ve died. What we don’t openly talk about is suicide’s toll on the doctors who have treated these patients. But when a patient dies by suicide, it leaves us profoundly changed. The news came by text as we drove home from brunch. My patient had died that morning by suicide. I read the text and wailed. My husband was driving, and our adult children happened to be away, traveling together on an exotic journey. I struggled to gather words, and my husband held control of the car through those excruciating moments when he thought something horrible had happened to our kids. I calmed down enough to tell him that the tragedy involved a patient. He was relieved. I was not. U.S. suicide rates increased by 25.4% between 1999 and 2016.1 It’s been estimated that at least half of psychiatrists will lose at least one patient to suicide during their career.2 There are no estimates on how many primary care physicians will have the same experience, though they often treat psychiatric disorders. Among people who complete suicide in the United States, 46% have been diagnosed with a mental health condition, and many more people have undiagnosed mental illness. We talk about the toll suicide takes on families. They experience grief, guilt, regret, anguish, anger, and stigma, […]

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Coordination of Care or Conflict of Interest? Exempting ACOs from the Stark Law

New England Journal of Medicine Perspective Genevieve P. Kanter, Ph.D. and Mark V. Pauly, Ph.D. Suppose you are a Medicare-insured patient with coronary artery disease. You will visit, on average, 10 physicians at six practice sites in a given year.1 Such fragmentation of care has spurred efforts by health care systems and payers to coordinate the delivery of care by multiple providers in a range of settings. Hospitals and physician practices are merging at increasing rates to form integrated delivery systems with the goal of delivering harmonized services across the continuum of care — from initial primary care visit to hospital admission to nursing facility discharge. In addition, under the Affordable Care Act, hospitals and physician groups are encouraged to form accountable care organizations (ACOs) that jointly contract to deliver care to specified populations of Medicare beneficiaries. Care coordination has become a central theme of new payment and delivery systems and is believed to be an indispensable strategy for eliminating delivery inefficiencies, controlling costs, and improving outcomes. There is, however, at least one downside to care coordination arrangements: they clash with existing regulations on financial conflicts of interest in medicine. This set of regulations, collectively known as the Stark law, prohibits physicians from referring patients to providers when a financial arrangement would allow the referring physician to benefit from such a referral. For example, physicians who have a profit-sharing agreement with a nursing home are prohibited from referring their Medicare and […]

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Road Blocks in Life

We all hit road blocks in life, some lasting weeks, others years. To survive the beat down you have to remain focused on forward steps, even nano steps are moving forward. I was lucky, abuse, trauma and self-hatred started while very young. Growing up hearing how stupid I was convinced me it was true. I was abused, sexually abused and […]

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Guest Post with Harry Cline from newcaregiver.org

When it comes to Caregiving you may have questions regarding the options like where to live, type of facility or helping your loved one remain at home. Questions like Government benefits, health insurance, home care, and the never-ending questions that continue as your loved one ages. Please welcome Author Harry Cline of The New Caregiver’s Comprehensive Resource: Advice, Tips, and […]

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23andMe Receives FDA Clearance for Genetic Health Risk report that looks at a Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndrome

  By 23andMe on Tue, 22 Jan 2019 17:03:37   23andMe received FDA clearance to report on the two most common genetic variants influencing what is called MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome.This new clearance is part of… The post 23andMe Receives FDA Clearance for Genetic Health Risk report that looks at a Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndrome appeared first on 23andMe Blog.

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How to make your small wins work for you

IDEAS.TED.Com Jan 29, 2019 / Rob Smith The internet has inflated people’s expectations about what success looks like — any achievement that doesn’t go viral can seem skimpy. By changing our perspective and appreciating human-size, human-scale achievements, we can move towards our goals, says educator Mehrnaz Bassiri. Every weekday for the month of January, TED Ideas is publishing a new post in a series called “How to Be a Better Human,” containing a helpful piece of advice from a speaker in the TED community. To see all the posts, click here. “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” We’ve heard this chestnut — or seen it in Instagram posts with handwritten fonts — over and over again. But is there truth in this stale nut? And if so, how can we translate it into real life? Well, it may be time to give this aphorism a refresh and change it to: “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single win.” That’s because success can be found when we start to mark and celebrate our small wins, according to Vancouver-based educator Mehrnaz Bassiri. Drawing on the work of organizational theorist and psychologist Karl Weick, Bassiri says, “Small wins have a transformational power. Once a small win has been accomplished, forces are set in motion to favor another small win and another small win until the combination of these small wins lead to larger and greater […]

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Stream of Conciseness Saturday #soSC Affirm

The Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “affirm.” Use it any way you’d like. Enjoy! Praying each day affirms my belief in God is strong and unwavering.   Join us for the fun and sharing good media stories   For more on the Stream of Consciousness Saturday, visit Linda Hill’s blog. Here’s the link: https://lindaghill.com/2019/01/18/the-friday-reminder-for-socs-jusjojan-2019-daily-prompt-jan-19th/ Here are the rules for SoCS: 1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write. 2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop. 3. There will be a prompt every week. I will post the prompt here on my blog on Friday, along with a reminder for you to join in. The prompt will be one random thing, but it will not be a subject. For instance, I will not say “Write about dogs”; the prompt will be more like, “Make your first sentence a question,” “Begin with the word ‘The’,” or simply a single word to get your started. 4. Ping back! It’s important, so that I and other people can come and read your post! For example, in your post you can write “This post is part of SoCS:” and then copy […]

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Friday Quote

  Helen Keller Friendship, Light, Friend, Alone, Better Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence. Helen Keller Motivational, Confidence, Hope, Faith The best.  Most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched – they must be felt with the heart. Helen Keller Inspirational Beautiful, Heart, Best Walking with […]

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La educación sexual de Netflix es genial, pero se pone mal la terapia y no es la única.

Espía digital POR ABBY ROBINSON 28/01/2019 La nueva serie de comedia dramática británica Sex Education es un golpe inmediato, que pega a los estudiantes de la escuela secundaria Moordale y sus preocupaciones basadas en el sexo justo en frente de su cara sin previo aviso o disculpa. Porque esto es un espectáculo en una misión: “[se trata de] animar a la gente a arrancar la venda de la ayuda y tener esas conversaciones incómodas, torpe sobre el sexo, en lugar de embotellar todo en el interior, o pensar que tienen que ir en línea para obtener las respuestas, ” escritor Laurie Nunn le dijo a Digital Spy y a otra prensa. “Para tratar de hablar con sus compañeros o-si pueden manejarlo-a sus padres, o a sus amigos. “Realmente pensamos que eso les va a ayudar a tener relaciones sexuales más saludables. ” Es un propósito noble y por eso, nada es sanitizado. Las preocupaciones que los personajes están lidiando están pintadas en los colores más ruidosos, enfáticamente salpicado a través de la pantalla porque, como el reparto y la tripulación tienen contras “La primera campana de alarma que experimenté cuando vi que era la forma en que sugirió que el sexo y la terapia de relaciones era algo completamente dividido de la salud general de la gente y el bienestar mental, ” profesor Sarah Niblock, Director Ejecutivo del Reino Unido Consejo de psicoterapeutas, le dice a Digital Spy exclusivamente. “Eso […]

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Netflix’s Sex Education is great – but it gets therapy wrong And it’s not the only one.

Digital Spy BY ABBY ROBINSON 28/01/2019   Netflix’s brand new British comedy-drama series Sex Education packs an immediate punch, sticking the students of Moordale Secondary School and their sex-based concerns right in front of your face without warning or apology.   Because this is a show on a mission: “[It’s about] encouraging people to rip the band-aid off and have those uncomfortable, awkward conversations about sex, rather than bottle it all up inside, or think that they have to go online to get the answers,” writer Laurie Nunn told Digital Spy and other press. “To try and talk to their partners or – if they can handle it – to their parents, or to their friends. “We really think that that’s going to help them have healthier sexual relationships.”   It’s a noble purpose and because of that, nothing is sanitised. The concerns that the characters are grappling with are painted in the loudest colours, emphatically splashed across the screen because, as the cast and crew have consistently emphasised, Sex Education is nothing if not real. It does the heavy lifting, having those all-important yet toe-curling dialogues – about relationships, identity, and what healthy, consensual sex looks like – that most of us swerved like Fast & Furious drivers during our younger years, and often still do. Sex Education is just that: an education. (And we love it, by the way.) But it could be accused of falling short in […]

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Today in History January 31st

1734 Robert Morris, merchant (signed Declaration of Independence) 1865 Congress passes the 13th Amendment, abolishing slavery in America (passes 121-24) 1872 Zane Grey, American West novelist (Riders of the Purple Sage) 1925 Charles Aidman, American TV narrator (New Twilight Zone), born in Frankfort, Indiana 1949 ‘These Are My Children‘ is broadcast live on Chicago’s NBC station. It’s the first in […]

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What old story about yourself are you still believing? Here’s how to find it and change it

Ideas.Ted.com Jan 24, 2019 / Mary Halton Many of us hold deeply ingrained beliefs about ourselves that are simply not true. You can start to free yourself from them by editing your narrative, says psychiatrist John Sharp. Every weekday for the month of January, TED Ideas is publishing a new post in a series called “How to Be a Better […]

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It’s All About Me: Menstruation & Body Changes

  Brought to you by Medical City Women’s Plano If your daughter is approaching puberty you have an important task ahead. The better prepared her for the upcoming biological changes, the easier her transition to womanhood will be. Mothers and daughters together can learn about the biological, medical and practical lifestyle aspects of menstruation from an OB/GYN on Staff at Medical […]

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The Upside to Conflicts in Middle School

Posted on January 14, 2019by Free Spirit Publishing I’m sitting at a busy lunch table full of sixth graders. There is energy you can’t put your finger on and a deafening hum that continues from the first lunch all the way to the last. All 150 students are engaged in the same activity at the same time: communicating. With each word expressed in this lunchroom, lessons are being learned that will be filed away and used the next time there is a similar social situation. Sound confusing and overwhelming to keep up with? Just ask one of these sixth graders, and they will tell you that it absolutely is! Teachers in middle school will often comment that being with their students from one day to another is like playing tug-of-war. For every day a student makes progress, the next day he or she might fall behind, have a behavioral slip-up, and/or refuse to work. Parents might say they have never seen their children so sullen at times, and they miss the carefree nature of their son or daughter. However, these things only mean that adolescents are acting appropriately for their age. Middle schoolers are constantly making big connections, which lead to big lessons. These students will leave the lunchroom and continue communicating their way through endless life lessons until they can stand on their own two feet and approach independence. It’s going to be rocky at times, but if students can pick […]

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Stream of Consciousness Saturday #SoCS Zommie

  Zoomie word of the week.  Instead of looking for a definition, it’s time to wing it. I could see my nick name being Zoomie because walking at 10 months old created an unwanted road race my mother was not ready for. As a young girl Zoomie would fit my curiosity for all things behind doors. In kindergarten I snuck into the Janitor’s maintenance room and found large buckets of paint. I pried the lid off of one, it was solid on top, my little mind went “how far down is it dried”. I found out quickly not very far, just to the top of my arm. Imagine the Supervisors surprise when all the others are taking naps and I’m covered in paint.   Join us for the fun and sharing good media stories   For more on the Stream of Consciousness Saturday, visit Linda Hill’s blog. Here’s the link: https://lindaghill.com/2019/01/18/the-friday-reminder-for-socs-jusjojan-2019-daily-prompt-jan-19th/ Here are the rules for SoCS: 1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write. 2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop. 3. There will be a prompt every week. I will post the prompt here on my blog […]

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Barran’s Bears: How police are spreading cheer to kids. #WATWB

One sheriff’s department is going above and beyond the call of duty, using stuffed animals to comfort kids in traumatic situations. Deputy Turner Barran, of Louisiana’s Jefferson Parish Sheriff’s Office, talks about the impact of Barran’s Bears. https://www.today.com/video/barran-s-bears-how-police-are-spreading-cheer-to-kids-1429821507843         Join us the last Friday of each month spending good news with a special story that moved your heart. ~~~GUIDELINES~~~ Keep your post to below 500 words. All we ask is you link to a human news story on your blog on the last Friday of each month, one that shows love and humanity. Join us in sharing news that warms the cockles of our heart. No story is too big or small, as long as it goes beyond religion and politics, into the core of humanity. Place the WE ARE THE WORLD BLOGFEST Badge on your sidebar, and help us spread the word on social media. Tweets, Facebook shares, G+ shares using the #WATWB hashtag through the month most welcome. More We Are the World Blogfest signups mean more friends, love and light for all of us. We’ll read and comment on each others’ posts, get to know each other better, and hopefully, make or renew some friendships with everyone who signs on as participants in the coming months. Add your post HERE so we can all find it quickly.

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Spreading Mental Health Awareness: One Teen at a Time — Peace from Panic

I wish I would’ve known about mental health conditions when I was a teenager. If I had, I may have told someone about my frightening and strange panic attack symptoms. I could’ve received medical help much earlier than I did. But I was embarrassed and didn’t want to be different. To me, it wasn’t an […] via Spreading Mental Health Awareness: One Teen at a Time — Peace from Panic

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Today in History January 24th

  First canned beer goes on sale Canned beer makes its debut on this day in 1935. In partnership with the American Can Company, the Gottfried Krueger Brewing Company delivered 2,000 cans of Krueger’s Finest Beer and Krueger’s Cream Ale to faithful Krueger drinkers in Richmond, Virginia. Ninety-one percent of the drinkers approved of the canned beer, driving Krueger to give […]

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Did Daddy know he was “Crazy”

My father committed suicide in 1992, put a shot-gun in his mouth. I was 28 years old, we were estranged since I was a teen. A trigger hit me like a hurricane this week. I’m having memories, not the worst. You put the the pressure on my shoulders to arrange everything, who to call. I had to face the chore of the house, a man living out of touch for many years. Worst was going to morgue, hand me original note and his bloody shotgun. Could you not see your friends were different? They were thieves but not in the same universe. They all took advantage of you, move in move out and steal what they want. One roommate committed suicide with your gun in your house. Down on their luck, will make payments on car, he was lucky to get three payments. He would have to track down and repo the car. They would come back begging and he would do it again. His friends were people at the bar he parked cars at. All the ladies got special attention, my father walked the lot to make sure the cars were secure. They all flirted with him, fake flirting, trashy bar, easy women going to bar in the hood looking for love. One night feeling the black dog, I went to the bar where my father parked cars. We played a game of pool, sitting at the bar he […]

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Eight Benefits to Tamanu Oil

Feb./March/April Edition Willow and Sage by Stampington Tamanu oil is derived from the Tamanu tree, which originates in the Polynesian islands, tropical Southeast Asia, south India, and the tropical African Coast. With antioxidants, antibacterial, anti-inch, and healing properties, it has been used for skin care as well as hair care. The smell is slightly sweet and someone nutty, the color […]

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Vaping, CBD Oil, Gummies and Kraton

Last week I expanded my CBD options from oil to qummies and vaping (supplements and cream are in route). I purchased two packages of Kraton, still researching before I put in my body. National Geographic and Anthony Burdain with The Travel Channel went deep in the rainforest and others places only reached by boat. The locals ate leaves which took them […]

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Stream of Consciousness Saturday #SoCS

  This is my first go participating Stream of Consciousness Saturday #SoSC, if I miss something please point it out, nicely. 🙂 Television was a step closer to the internet by way of seeing images for the first time. Much like the radio brought words to books. I’ve seen photos and painting of people gathered around the radio, more imagination is needed to listen and draw the story in your mind. I had two favorite shows, Popeye and Gunsmoke. Sounds like a strange combo, I was a grandpa’s girl and Gunsmoke was his show. Looking at both now and then, it’s often the good guys against the bad. Melinda For more on the Stream of Consciousness Saturday, visit Linda Hill’s blog. Here’s the link: https://lindaghill.com/2019/01/18/the-friday-reminder-for-socs-jusjojan-2019-daily-prompt-jan-19th/ Here are the rules for SoCS: 1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write. 2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop. 3. There will be a prompt every week. I will post the prompt here on my blog on Friday, along with a reminder for you to join in. The prompt will be one random thing, but it will not be a subject. For […]

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How do I get rid of bumpy skin on my arms? — Healthverb

Everything you should know about the bumpy red skin on your arms called keratosis pilaris. Lumpy, bumpy limbs are not just the preserve of oven-ready poultry. ‘Chicken Skin’, Keratosis pilaris affects as many as 1 in 3 of us1.It tends to run in families and although it’s harmless, it can be unsightly. Unfortunately, there’s still […] via How do I get rid of bumpy skin on my arms? — Healthverb

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Channeling The Pain Of Depression Into Photography, And Finding You Are Not Alone

December 31, 20189:49 AM ET BECKY HARLAN In a particularly difficult season of depression, photography was one of the tools Tara Wray used to cope. “Just forcing myself to get out of my head and using the camera to do that is, in a way, a therapeutic tool,” says Wray, a photographer and filmmaker based in central Vermont. “It’s like exercise: You don’t want to do it, you have to make yourself do it, and you feel better after you do.” In July, she published Too Tired for Sunshine, a book of her photos from that period, taken between 2011 and 2018. Some of the images show a stark beauty, others a raw loneliness, and some capture hints that the world may be slightly off-kilter. Photographically, Wray says she’s drawn to light, the honesty of dogs and “things that are humorous and maybe aren’t trying to be.” Making these images helped keep her buoyant. Having a camera functions as “a sort of protection, a buffer that gives me a reason to be somewhere,” she says. “It helps me move through an environment with a purpose when I might otherwise feel out of place.” And, like exercise, photography provides a kind of release. “When I’ve made what I think is a good picture, I can feel it, and everything else momentarily falls away.” Through creative expression, Wray says she’s able to focus her “ruminating or obsessing” into “something bigger.” “There were moments that I felt […]

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Today in History January 17th

In 1929, His an iconic rascal endearing to history, a fictional hero. His name is Popeye the Sailor Man.  Popeye was created by Elzie Crisler Sega and syndicated by the New York Journal for the Thimble Theatre Page, through King Features, on December 19, 1919. Popeye the Sailor Man: “I yam what I yam” – he‘s feisty yet endearing! Jan. […]

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Can fatty liver be cured by exercise? — Healthverb

The researchers found that exercise, regardless of volume or intensity, benefits non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients even in the absence of weight loss. NAFLD is commonly associated with obesity and diabetes. “The results from our study show that all exercise doses, irrespective of volume or intensity, were efficacious in reducing liver fat and visceral […] via Can fatty liver be cured by exercise? — Healthverb

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Sheet Mask Basics

From Willow and Sage from Stampington Sheet Mask Basics Here we help narrow down your options and break down the basics.   Microfiber Sheets Microfiber sheets masks are the most common type on the market. Typically the cheapest option, they are made from non-woven, cotton-like fabric that is drenched in various ingredients to replenish the skin; however the microfiber causes the moister to evaporate quickly. These are not always one size fits all. Hydrogel Hydrogel mask are made from cosmetic serums and gelatin to produce a thin-film layer that locks in moisture and sticks to your face better than microfiber mask. These options are often sold as a system with two halves applied separately. Bio-cellulose Bio-cellulose mask consist of all natural fiber that experts consider the highest standard for hydrating skin and replenishing skin. They perform better mainly due to the snug adhesion the fiber allows to the face, maintaining the moist and nutrients through the entire application. Clay and Charcoal Clay and charcoal mask sheet masks, saturated with clay or charcoal and black in color, work to detoxify the skin from unwanted impurities. They often soothe the skin. Bubbling Sheet Mask Bubbling sheet masks work in a similar fashion bubbling mask. Made of charcoal, detoxifying nutrients, and sparkling water, foam is formed on top of the sheet mask, which is then to be massaged into skin after application. This helps to keep moisture locked into your skin afterward.

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Learning To Thrive In Spite Of The Fibro “Storm”: My Top 3 Tips — Reclaiming HOPE

We’re getting snow today….or maybe a mix of sleet, rain and snow…. We’re hearing three different things from three different news outlets. We definitely have a winter storm coming in, but the forecasters don’t seem to know exactly what path, and therefore what type of precipitation this storm is actually going to take yet. Sometimes […] via Learning To Thrive In Spite Of The Fibro “Storm”: My Top 3 Tips — Reclaiming HOPE

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Want to save your mental energy for the stuff that really matters? Set a decision budget

Ideas.Ted.com Jan 9, 2019 / Dave Asprey Watch his TEDxConstitutionDrive talk here: ABOUT THE AUTHOR Dave Asprey is a Silicon Valley investor and technology entrepreneur. He has spent over two decades and $1 million to hack his own biology and be a better husband, father and entrepreneur. Asprey is the creator of Bulletproof Coffee, founder of the Bulletproof Executive blog, host of the […]

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RAINN: Marissa’s Story

“When I speak authentically and truthfully about my experience, I have power. I am not going away.” Marissa Hoechstetter was repeatedly sexually assaulted by the OB-GYN she saw during her pregnancy, the delivery of her twin daughters, and follow-up appointments. The perpetrator was well-regarded in the field and was recommended to Marissa by a friend. At the time of the incidents, Marissa trusted her doctor’s treatment and was focused on making sure her pregnancy went well. “With medical professionals, there’s often a legitimate reason for why their hands are on your body. There’s a gray area and the minute you step into their office, they have power over you,” says Marissa. “Looking back, there were a lot of things that felt odd, but I was pregnant and focused on my babies and after all, this person was the uncle of a close friend of mine.” During one visit after her twins were born, Marissa recognized that the behavior crossed medical boundaries and knew immediately that something was wrong. “I felt it happen and froze. I never went back.” Despite continuing to feel for years that what had happened was wrong, Marissa chose not to report because she was immersed in being a new mother and found herself minimizing her own experience in comparison to other stories of sexual assault. “It just kept coming back to me how wrong it was, but I had one-year-old twins and was working full-time. I didn’t have the ability to […]

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Happy 98th Birthday Granny

Granny it’s hard to believe it’s your 98th birthday, I celebrate the memories in my head. You were on my side from birth, making unannounced house visits, questioning where I was and making sure I had clothes. You made my clothes until fifth grade, how did you find the time with all the hard work you did? Times were so […]

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12 Life-Changing Reads & Self-Help Books For 2019 — Invisibly Me

With attempts to renew hope and motivation for the New Year, I thought I’d share a few life-changing reads and self-help books to reignite your spark. These are reads to inspire, encourage, empower and enlighten, with a particular focus on chronic illness and mental health. Happy reading! 1. You Can Heal Your Life – Louise […] via 12 Life-Changing Reads & Self-Help Books For 2019 — Invisibly Me

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On This Day In History

1898.     Painter Henri Matisse (28) weds Amélie Noellie Parayre 1841  George Melville, American polar explorer & naval engineer, born in NYC, New York (d. 1912) 1946 First meeting of the United Nations The first General Assembly of the United Nations, comprising 51 nations, convenes at Westminster Central Hall in London, England. One week later, the U.N. Security Council met for […]

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Dementia and Suicide

Second Stage Dementia   As dementia progresses, the symptoms first experienced in the early stages of the dementia generally worsen. The rate of decline is different for each person. A person with moderate dementia scores between 6–17 on the MMSE. For example, people with Alzheimer’s dementia in the moderate stages lose almost all new information very quickly. People with dementia […]

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Lyme Progress #7 Supplements?

Every case of Lyme is different partly do to which major organ the spirochetes  penetrate and set up house. They go for the brain, liver, kidney’s or heart, some of the symptoms are relative to the organ they set up house in. Then you have co-infections to deal with. A tick can give you Lyme and other diseases it carries […]

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Could your thoughts make you age faster?

Apr 26, 2017 / Elizabeth Blackburn + Elissa Epel Researchers are finding that your mental patterns could be harming your telomeres — essential parts of the cell’s DNA — and affecting your life and health. Nobel-winning scientist Elizabeth Blackburn and health psychologist Elissa Epel explain. How can one person bask in the sunshine of good health, while another person looks old before her time? Humans have been asking this question for millennia, and recently, it’s becoming clearer and clearer to scientists that the differences between people’s rates of aging lie in the complex interactions among genes, social relationships, environments and lifestyles. Even though you are born with a particular set of genes, the way you live can influence how they express themselves. Some lifestyle factors may even turn genes on or shut them off. Deep within the genetic heart of all our cells are telomeres, or repeating segments of noncoding DNA that live at the ends of the chromosomes. They form caps at the ends of the chromosomes and keep the genetic material from unraveling. Shortening with each cell division, they help determine how fast a cell ages. When they become too short, the cell stops dividing altogether. This isn’t the only reason a cell can become senescent — there are other stresses on cells we don’t yet understand very well — but short telomeres are one of the major reasons human cells grow old. We’ve devoted most of our careers to studying telomeres, and […]

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How to use rituals to get closer to the people you care about

Jan 4, 2019 / Carly Alaimo Raúl Soria By turning our get-togethers with friends into regular events, we can build the kinds of connections that will sustain us, says life coach Baya Voce. Every weekday for the month of January, TED Ideas will publish a new post in a series called “How to Be a Better Human,” containing a helpful piece of advice from a speaker in the TED community. With all the “must dos” (work, pets, kids, home repairs, doctors’ visits) and “should dos” (eat right, sleep enough, check in with family, exercise) in our lives, there’s often little room for anything else. But what tends to fall between the cracks is everyone who doesn’t fall into those categories — like our friends and neighbors. Why does this matter? “People who are more socially connected to family, to friends, to community, are happier, they’re physically healthier, and they live longer than people who are less well connected,” says psychiatrist Robert Waldinger — who directs the longest-running study on wellbeing and adult development at Harvard University — in his TED talk. Instead of thinking of socializing as skippable, try to view it as an essential and energizing part of your life. Life coach and event producer Baya Vocesuggests making a ritual out of get-togethers, something she calls “a powerful tool for connection.” Here’s how Voce and her friends do this: “For me and my girlfriends, our couches act as the metaphorical fire that we gather around. Every Monday […]

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How Does Lighting Affect Mental Health in the Workplace

Dr. Pragya Agarwal  Contributor Forbes.com Poor lighting often gets overlooked in the workplace, as we talk about mental health and well-being, and the focus is firmly on creating happier and healthier workplaces. But bad lighting is associated with a range of ill-health effects, both physical and mental, such as eye strain, headaches, fatigue and also stress and anxiety in more high-pressured work […]

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Will Alexa Become Your Next Marriage Counselor

DECEMBER 27, 2018  While it’s estimated that nearly 93% of soon-to-be brides use the internet to plan their wedding, we might have more tech to thank when it comes to making our marriage last. According to new reports, home listening devices, like Alexa and Google Home, might have the ability to detect common problems in your relationship. These virtual assistants are always […]

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Is ‘Bird Box’ About Mental Health?

Psychology Today Shainna Ali Ph.D., LMHC A Modern Mentality   If you’re a human who uses social media, you’ve likely seen flocks of folks commenting on Netflix’s recently released psychological thriller, Bird Box. Based on the post-apocalyptic novel by Josh Malerman, the adaptation has spiked in recent popularity as Netflix claims it has been watched by over 45 million viewers in just one week.   Bird […]

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Friday Quote: Life and Living

“My life is my message.” Mahatma Gandhi “Not how long, but how well you have lived is the main thing.”  Seneca “Time means a lot to me because, you see, I, too, am also a learner and am often lost in the joy of forever developing and simplifying. If you love life, don’t waste time, for time is what life is made up of.” Bruce Lee Unknown  

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Today in History January 3rd

1496 Leonardo da Vinci unsuccessfully tests a flying machine 1777  General George Washington‘s revolutionary army defeats British forces at Battle of Princeton, New Jersey 1834 The government of Mexico imprisons Stephen F. Austin in Mexico City. 1977 Apple Computer, Inc incorporates 1986 British golfer Nick Faldo (28) weds manager’s secretary Gill Bennett   1840  1st deep sea sounding by James Clark Ross in south Atlantic at 2425                                 fathoms (14,450 feet) 1888 1st wax drinking straw patented, by Marvin C Stone in Washington, D.C.   Birthdays 1956   Mel Gibson, American actor (Mad Max, Mrs Soffel, Lethal Weapon) and                filmmaker, born in Peekskill, New York 1965  Eli Manning 1946  John Paul Jones, rocker, Led Zeppelin-Stairway to Heaven  

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Art curiosity

Originally posted on CRAZY LIFE:
I discovered my free online university, WordPress, and learned not only about writing but another subject that interest me also, so since this blog is called Crazy Life, there is a person https://lookingforthelight.blog/2018/12/27/for-the-love-of-art-plans-for-next-year/ wich I decided and… ordered! What is up with this art thing, always intrigued me. So I send her some questions and the person actually responded to this Crazy Blog, very interesting I might say.. Do you Paint? No I don´t paint, and neither I have goals to learn. (That took me by surprise, yet again I kept on asking) What does art do for you? Art takes me to the time period, it allows me to travel without leaving the chair. I look at the complexity of the art, were they appreciated at the time period. Even if I don’t like a time period or particular piece, I try to put myself in their shoes imaging what they were thinking while painting. How long did the painting take and what was the inspiration. What do you think about modern art? I am not a fan of Modern art yet have several pieces of current Modern, like Kieth Haring and Peter Max. It’s a goal to see more from the time period to see if a pice or artist changes my mind. Take Picasso, I like his early work very but when he moves into Fauvism and Cubism, you can count me…

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3 ways that your memory stays sharp even as you get older

Ideas.TED.com Oct 4, 2018 / Alan D. Castel While overall memory declines as we age, that’s far from the end of the story. In fact, there are certain things older people continue to remember quite well, says researcher Alan D. Castel. Our memories are our identities, and at my lab at UCLA, I’ve worked to understand how we remember what matters to us, especially as we age. Memory decline is one of the first things that concern people about growing older — it can start after the age of 20, so being more forgetful when you are 60 or 70 is often normal. And while a vast amount of research has shown the deficits that accompany aging, it’s far too simplistic to say that the elderly have impaired memories. In fact, there are many things older adults remember quite well. Here’s a look at a few of them: 1. Older people tend to remember the essentials. A great deal of memory research focuses on what might be considered by some of us to be mundane — word lists, face-name pairs, studying and being tested on pictures — and it’s unclear why this might be important to remember. But how about things that are of real concern or interest? Imagine you’re packing for a trip. You want to make sure you’ve put in the most important items, the ones that would be extremely costly and/or inconvenient if you forgot them (e.g., your passport, your credit cards). While […]

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Once unwanted, these dogs are now on the front lines of wildlife conservation

Ideas TED Talks Nov 6, 2018 / Rebekah Barnett These incredible pups catch poachers, sniff out invasive plants and diseases, and more, thanks to the work of wildlife biologist and conservation-dog expert Megan Parker. What happens to those dogs that are just too much dog for people to handle? “You know them — you go to your friend’s barbecue, their dog is so happy to see you that she pees on your feet, and she drops a slobbery ball in your lap,” says Megan Parker (TEDxJacksonHole talk: Dogs for Conservation), a wildlife biologist and dog expert based in Bozeman, Montana. “You throw it to get as much distance between you and the dog as possible, but she keeps coming back with the ball. By the 950th throw, you’re thinking, Why don’t they get rid of this dog?” All too often, their owners reach the same conclusion and leave their pet at a shelter. Thanks to Parker and the team at Working Dogs for Conservation (WD4C), some of these dogs have found a new leash lease on life. They’re using their olfactory abilities and unstoppable drive in a wide variety of earth-friendly ways, working with human handlers to sniff out illegal poachers and smugglers, track endangered species, and spot destructive invasive plants and animals. Chai is shown here with a trainer. After a dog learns to recognize a particular scent, the education isn’t over — their handler works with them regularly so they maintain their skills. These days, you can find this […]

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Today in History December 27

Radio City Music Hall opens in New York City  1932 The huge Art Deco theater is the anchor for John D. Rockefeller Jr.’s 12-acre complex, the Rockefeller Center in Midtown Manhattan. Tonight’s opening is a lavish stage show featuring dance by Martha Graham and vaudeville acts by Ray Bolger and others. It will be the top tourist destination in New […]

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Make Your Own Essential Oils

Recipe from Willow and Sage by Stampington Making your own essential oil is easier than you think. Gather dried herbs and oil of choice. Dried herbs are better than fresh to prevent mold.  Here are some single oils you can infuse along with their healing benefits.  Calendula Oil–Use for any skin remedies, like in lotion or facial oil. Peppermint Oil–Wonderful for […]

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Powering Down at Nighttime

Great suggestions is from Willow and Sage by Stamptington Simple Sleep Remedies Set a consistent sleeping schedule. Going to sleep and waking up at the same time each day helps regulate your internal clock, making it easier to fall asleep and get up in the morning refreshed. Drink plenty of water throughout the day, but stop at least two hours […]

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