Skip to content

*Last piece of mail you received* #SoSC

The last piece of mail is the same as all the mail I get, a sales flyer. Yesterday was for a plumber…..we could use one since my shower drain keeps clogging. That’s what’s happens when your losing loads of hair. The other piece of mail thou not addressed to me was this month’s Wood Worker magazine. It’s not my thing but I do love pointing out all the projects he could do for me. That would require getting off the computer. Maybe the next piece of mail will spark action. Melinda Join us for the fun and sharing good media stories   For more on the Stream of Consciousness Saturday, visit Linda Hill’s blog. Here’s the link: https://lindaghill.com Here are the rules for SoCS: 1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write. 2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop. 3. There will be a prompt every week. I will post the prompt here on my blog on Friday, along with a reminder for you to join in. The prompt will be one random thing, but it will not be a subject. For instance, I will not say “Write about dogs”; […]

Read More →

Lyme Progress #8 Fibromyalgia

    I’ve written 76 WordPress post on Chronic Lyme, rarely acknowledging the other Chronic Illnesses I have. When I started treatment for Lyme someone said to me, just wait you’ll get all types of other illnesses. I thought I was dying, having IV Therapy treatment seven days a week, Sunday bandage change, and do it all over again. I flew to D.C. […]

Read More →

The Healing Power of Telling Your Trauma Story

Psychology Today  March 6, 2019 Seth J. Gillihan Ph.D. Think, Act, Be When we’ve survived an extremely upsetting event, it can be painful to revisit the memory. Many of us would prefer not to talk about it, whether it was a car accident, fire, assault, medical emergency, or something else. However, our trauma memoriescan continue to haunt us, even — or especially — if we try to avoid them. The more we push away the memory, the more the thoughts tend to intrude on our minds, as many research studies have shown. If and how we decide to share our trauma memories is a very personal choice, and we have to choose carefully those we entrust with this part of ourselves. When we do choose to tell our story to someone we trust, the following benefits may await. (Please note that additional considerations are often necessary for those with severe and prolonged experiences of trauma or abuse, as noted below.) 1. Feelings of shame subside.  Keeping trauma a secret can reinforce the feeling that there’s something shameful about what happened — or even about oneself on a more fundamental level. We might believe that others will think less of us if we tell them about our traumatic experience. When we tell our story and find support instead of shame or criticism, we discover we having nothing to hide. You might even notice a shift in your posture over time — that thinking about or describing your trauma no longer makes […]

Read More →

Justin Bieber Opens Up About Mental Health on Instagram

Teen Vouge By De Elizabeth March 10, 2019 Getty Images “Been struggling a lot. Just feeling super disconnected and weird.”  Justin Bieber got real about mental health again — and asked his fans for their continued support. In an Instagram post on March 10, the singer-songwriter expressed that he wanted to update his fans on what he’s been going through, in hopes that it will “resonate” with his followers. “Been struggling a lot. Just feeling super disconnected and weird,” he wrote, adding that he always “bounces back” so he isn’t worried. Still, he said that having his fans’ support and positivity is helpful, adding that he’s been “facing my stuff head-on.” From the comments, it’s clear Justin’s fans have his back every step of the way. One fan, who shared that they experience depression, wrote: “Love you always and I hope you can find a way to feel better and more like yourself again.” Another Belieber told the singer, “We all believe in you!” View this post on Instagram Just wanted to keep you guys updated a little bit hopefully what I’m going through will resonate with you guys. Been struggling a lot. Just feeling super disconnected and weird.. I always bounce back so I’m not worried just wanted to reach out and ask for your guys to pray for me. God is faithful and ur prayers really work thanks .. the most human season I’ve ever been in facing my […]

Read More →

Today in History March 21st

Have a great day and thanks for stopping by. Melinda   1952 First Rock and Roll Concert DJ Alan Freed’s Moondog Coronation Ball, in Cleveland, Ohio, notably features racially mixed performers and fans. Considered history’s first big rock concert, some 20,000 screaming teens try to crowd into a venue that can hold just half that number. Police will halt the show after just one song is performed. 1980 Olympics Boycott Protesting the USSR’s invasion of Afghanistan, US President Jimmy Carter declares that the US won’t be participating in the upcoming Moscow Summer Olympics. In the end, 65 nations won’t participate in the games, but some will do so for economic, rather than political reasons. The USSR will respond in kind, snubbing the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Games. 1963 Alcatraz Prison in San Francisco Bay, a harsh maximum security jail which once housed gangster Al Capone, closed. 1965 Martin Luther King, Jr., led the start of a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. 1906 Ohio passes a law that prohibits hazing by fraternities. 1908 Frenchman Henri Farman carries a passenger in a bi-plane for the first time. 1928 President Calvin Coolidge presents the Congressional Medal of Honor to Charles Lindbergh, a captain in the US Army Air Corps Reserve, for making the first solo trans-Atlantic flight. On June 11, 1927, Lindbergh had received the first Distinguished Flying Cross ever awarded. 1939 Singer Kate Smith records “God Bless America” for […]

Read More →

How did the chicken reach the great idea? She borrowed The Onion’s techniques for brainstorming — ideas.ted.com

Brainstorms can result in a lot of sound and fury — shouted ideas, whiteboards covered with scribbles — but not much else. Here’s how The Onion sets up sharing for success, from designer and ex-Onion staffer Brian Janosch. via How did the chicken reach the great idea? She borrowed The Onion’s techniques for brainstorming — ideas.ted.com

Read More →

Throat got You down? Updated!

  Magnolia Issue #10 Throat Soother 1 large lemon Ginger root, fresh 2″ knob Turmeric root, fresh 2″ knob 2 cinnamon sticks 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1/2 cup honey Slice lemon, ginger, and turmeric paper-thin using a mandolin or sharp knife. Layer slices in a half-pint jar. Break cinnamon sticks lengthwise into several pieces and tuck them in jar. Add apple cider vinegar. Pour Pour honey into the jar, covering the other ingredients. Place jar in the refrigerator. The honey becomes thin syrup and read to use in 12 hours. To Use Stir up 1/4 cup into a hot tea or water: or take 1-2 tsp. syrup each hour as needed to soothe sore throat or cough. Shake the jar occasionally. Keep Refrigerated for up to three weeks. BONUS Grannies Recipe Mix equal parts honey, whiskey and lemon. Refrigerate in a pint jar, leave a spoon in and take a spoonful or two every time your throat needs it. Super Bonus Gramps Recipe Keep the bottle of Black Velvet on the nightstand, when you wake yourself up coughing, take a sig.

Read More →

Weighted Blanks for Mental Health — The Psych Talk

A weighted blanket is a blanket filled with hypoallergenic, non-toxic polypropylene pellets. The pellets are sewn into self-contained small pockets that are evenly distributed throughout the blanket. These pellets give the blanket its weight, which should generally be around 10 percent of the user’s body weight, give or take a few pounds depending on the […] Weighted Blanks for Mental Health — The Psych Talk

Read More →

Stream of Consciousness Saturday Week #SoSC “soul/sole”

Before blogging I kept many parts/experiences hidden, no one would or could understand. I was almost 30 before seeing a Therapist, boy the baggage I had. I hid parts of my life for several reasons, ashamed, guilty and I felt responsible. When I joined WordPress in 2005 it was a diversion to help me grieve my granny. I had very few followers and wasn’t involved, that blog was just for me and granny. After several years of the reading post, I noticed how many people had the same or similar secrets. I started to think about the past, analyzing each emotion, with the help of my Therapist I realized there was no shame or quilt. She helped me deal with the suicide of my father, my soul was an open book. My writing started to let these secrets out and love and support astounded me. I had never talked to someone with the same secrets. I’ve spent over ten years sharing my experiences, the bad and ugly, you could say people know me from head to sole. Melinda Join us for the fun and sharing good media stories   For more on the Stream of Consciousness Saturday, visit Linda Hill’s blog. Here’s the link: https://lindaghill.com Here are the rules for SoCS: 1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write. 2. Your post can be as […]

Read More →

22 Lesser Known Facts About Fibro — Fighting With Fibro

Thank you for the information packed post. Reblogged from Fighting With Fibro. If you’re like me, you’re always trying to stay apprised of new information surrounding your illness(es). Sometimes, it seems like I never see anything new and oftentimes, it seems the data I read is just somehow recycled; one site to another. So I spent some time (okay, a lot of time) gathering facts that, maybe, […] via 22 Lesser Known Facts About Fibro — Fighting With Fibro

Read More →

Today in History March 14

Have a great day and thank you for stopping by. Melinda   1794  Eli Whitney is granted a US patent for the cotton gin, a machine that vastly simplifies cotton harvesting. It will lead to huge profits for the cotton-rich South, but will also increase the demand for slaves to pick the expanded cotton crops. 1919 Max Brand, perhaps the […]

Read More →

Thoughts on Job Hunting: Interview Tips

Interview Tips If a job requires a resume, always take an extra copy. Take it out at first of interview and lay in lap. The greatest interview is being able to give examples of tasks or projects. As your interviewer doesn’t want to read what you’ve already written, give day-to-day details. If you pitched in while someone was on maternity leave […]

Read More →

Thoughts on Job Hunting

For many Spring Break is time to job hunt before the next school year starts. I worked in the Recruiting/Consulting/Staffing business for 30 years. I wanted to share some lessons that helped me and got me fired twice. Drawing the Line It can be difficult to draw the work/friend line for extroverted people, you may think your new lunch mates are […]

Read More →

Yo no….. Soy yo

No soy  Lyme crónico Fibromialgia Demencia Neuropatía Agrofóbico Cierre de Centrado en la enfermedad Estancarse Culpable Desesperada Buscando simpatía Soy yo Una mujer Esposa Perro madre Hermana Determinado Honesto Cuidado de un fallo Amar Asustado Tener metas elevadas Vivir con síntomas Fuerte voluntad Mentalidad abierta Escritor Estudiante No es un jugador ¿Cuál te gusta?  Melinda

Read More →

New fabulous friends!

Originally posted on Fightmsdaily:
After a lot of soul-searching and debate with myself due to fear of ridicule and possible judgments, I finally entered the blogging community in July 2017. I must say, this was one of the best decisions I have ever made and have never once regretted this adventure! There are numerous reasons I started and continue blogging…

Read More →

Reading list: 23 female TED speakers tell us about the books that shaped them

Ideas.Ted.Com Mar 7, 2018 / Rajpreet Heir Here are the books that profoundly influenced women from our speaker community, and they’re just as wonderfully diverse as TED itself. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë When I read this book for the first time as a deeply odd fifth-grader (or, as Jane says, “poor, plain, and little”), it felt like grasping onto a life raft that had been flung to me through the folds of time. Feeling such a kinship with Jane and with Charlotte Brontë herself made me feel, quite suddenly, less alone. I still re-read this book every couple of years, and it still speaks to something primal and yearning in me — the outsider woman who is finally seen, finds love, but also has the strength and self-possession to reject that love until she is able to accept it from a place of her own power and dignity. If you haven’t read it, do so immediately; if you read it a long time ago, it is well worth reading again; and if you, like me, can’t get enough of it, may I also recommend Wide Sargasso Sea, which is a prequel by Jean Rhys centered on the story of the mad wife in the attic. — Naomi McDougall Jones (TED Talk: What it’s like to be a woman in Hollywood) Good Woman by Lucille Clifton I read this collection of poems at a time of life when I was […]

Read More →

How to change your relationship with food — and stop eating your feelings

Ideas.Ted.Com Mar 4, 2019 / Daryl Chen   Jenice Kim Here are three common-sense tips to help you feed your hunger and not your emotions, from dietician Eve Lahijani. This post is part of TED’s “How to Be a Better Human” series, each of which contains a piece of helpful advice from someone in the TED community. To see all the posts, go here. Imagine if eating were as simple as, say, refueling a car. You’d fill up only when an indicator nudged towards E, you couldn’t possibly overdo it or else your tank would overflow, and you’d never, ever dream of using it as a treat. Instead, for many of us, eating is anything but straightforward. What starts out as a biological necessity quickly gets entangled with different emotions, ideas, memories and rituals. Food takes on all kinds of meanings — as solace, punishment, appeasement, celebration, obligation – and depending on the day and our mood, we may end up overeating, undereating or eating unwisely. It’s time for us to rethink our relationship with food, says Eve Lahijani, a Los Angeles-based dietician and a nutrition health educator at UCLA. She offers three common-sense steps to help get there. 1. Reconnect with your hunger. So many things drive us to eat — it’s noon and that means lunchtime, it’s midnight and that means snack time, we’re happy, we’re anxious, we’d rather not bring home leftovers, we’re too polite to say […]

Read More →

Highway to Hell Part Three

  At five years old I loved my baton and was quite good, until the day I got mad at my mother and bashed several holes in my closet door. There went the baton and the dream. No anger issues here! A large group of friends and I would tube down the Nacogdoches River. It’s a 6-8 hour trip if you do the full stretch. There is […]

Read More →

Learning about the Endocannabinoid System — My Wellness Journey

A great reblog by My Wellness Journey. Please check out her site where you will find other fascinating posts. One of the most interesting things I have learned about in the past few months is that all humans (and living creatures) have an Endocannabinoid system which is naturally present inside of our bodies. Apparently this system was discovered in the 1980’s. The science behind this fascinates me. All throughout our body systems we have […] via Learning about the Endocannabinoid System — My Wellness Journey

Read More →

Stream of Consciousness #SoSC “bash”

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “abash/a bash/bash.” Use “abash,” or “bash” as a noun or a verb. Bonus points if you manage all three. Have fun! JoAnna at https://joannaoftheforest.wordpress.com and I are on the exact same page with the bashing. We know each other, have talked a lot but I would not have guessed we would bash the exact same thing. For me bashing the media is on several layers, the parts left out to provide more drama, the local news running for two hours regurgitating the same stories. I can’t even watch the news without my blood pressure rising and wanting to bash something or someone. I try to watch one local and one national news a day but that is too much some days. When every story includes, Trump, Russians, North Korea, who was fired that day at the White House, I want to bash the television, the talking heads, the news stations and myself for allowing this behavior to happen. JoAnna watches Cop shows and so do I, it’s crazy that we have favorites that are the same. Blue Bloods is a nicer family cop show with doing the right thing is always the answer. I love the show but real life, my real life is not so holy. I prefer the bad-ass kick butt take names later type of show. I love NCIS LA because you have women who could probably kick […]

Read More →

Frugal Friday [ 08/03/2019 ] — Invisibly Me

Special Thanks to Invisibly Me for the Reblog Happy Friday, everyone! Breathe a sigh of relief as the weekend is here, you’ve survived another week, and tomorrow is a new day to start afresh. Here are just a couple of finds for this issue of Frugal Friday – Enjoy & have a restful weekend 🙂 Free Letter Samples & Templates Citizens Advice have […] via Frugal Friday [ 08/03/2019 ] — Invisibly Me

Read More →

Friday Quotes: Inspiring Women

  Thanks for stopping by and have a great weekend. Melinda Quotes from inspiring Women on International Women’s Day “I am a member of the team, and I rely on the team, I defer to it and sacrifice for it, because the team, not the individual, is the ultimate champion.” – Mia Hamm “I am lucky that whatever fear I […]

Read More →

On This Day In History March 7th

  1876 Alexander Graham Bell patents the telephone Following the development of his prototype ‘harmonic telegraph’ device, Scotland-born Alexander Graham Bell receives a US patent on a revolutionary new form of instantaneous communication, the telephone.   1965 Selma civil rights march becomes ‘Bloody Sunday’ Marching for civil rights for African Americans, hundreds of unarmed and peaceful protesters cross the Edmund […]

Read More →

It’s not politics or religion separating humans from each other; it’s shame

IDEAS.TED.com Feb 26, 2019 / Douglas Rushkoff   Excerpted from the new book Team Human by Douglas Rushkoff. Copyright © 2019 by Douglas Rushkoff. Reprinted by permission of W.W. Norton & Company. All rights reserved. Watch his TED Salon: Samsung talk here: https://embed.ted.com/talks/douglas_rushkoff_how_to_be_team_human_in_the_digital_future ABOUT THE AUTHOR Douglas Rushkoff is the host of the popular Team Human podcast. He has written 20 books, including the bestsellers “Present Shock” and “Program or Be Programmed,” as well as regular columns for Medium, CNN, Daily Beast and the Guardian. Rushkoff also made the PBS Frontline documentaries “Generation Like” and “Merchants of Cool.” He coined such concepts as “viral media” and “social currency,” and he’s been a leading voice for applying digital media toward social and economic justice. He is a research fellow of the Institute for the Future and founder of the Laboratory for Digital Humanism at CUNY/Queens, where he is a professor of media theory and digital economics.

Read More →

Beauty Tools 101: Clean or Toss

Willow and Sage by Stampington If you’ve ever noticed your skin or scalp acting out, it might be due to lack of clean beauty tools. Properly cleaning your everyday tools not only removes leftover makeup, oil, and dirt and keeps the tools usable longer, but also reduces the chance of bacteria causing breakouts, rashes, and infections. Follow this cheat sheet […]

Read More →

7 Signs You Have An Intense Emotional Bond With A Toxic Person

Bustle By KRISTINE FELLIZAR When you’re in an unhealthy relationship, the best and obvious thing for you to do is leave. But sometimes that’s easier said than done. If you’re in a trauma bond, therapists say it will make leaving that situation even harder “A trauma bond is an intense emotional bond between people that usually forms as a result of a toxic or abusive dynamic,” Samantha Waldman, MHC, an NYC-based therapist who specializes in trauma and relationships, tells Bustle. A past history of abuse or exposure to it can make a person more likely to form trauma bonds. For instance, people who experienced some form of neglect or abuse from childhood may normalize this behavior as an adult because it’s what they “learned.” As Dr. Connie Omari, clinician and owner of Tech Talk Therapy, tells Bustle, trauma bonding includes the tendency for a person to connect with others based off the needs of their own traumatic experiences. “Because trauma involves some unmet emotional or psychological need, the relationship serves as a way to meet this need, even when it’s not done so appropriately,” she says. “It looks very dysfunctional and typically includes one or more forms of abuse.” These bonds aren’t limited to romantic relationships. You can form a trauma bond with friends, family members, and even co-workers. When you’re in a trauma bond, you’ll find yourself continually drawn to someone even though they cause you significant pain. It’s […]

Read More →

5 Things I Wish I’d Known Before My Chronic Illness

New York Times By Tessa Miller  Feburary 18, 2019   Finding out you have a chronic illness — one that will, by definition, never go away — changes things, both for you and those you love. Seven Thanksgivings ago, I got sick and I never got better. What I thought was food poisoning turned out to be Crohn’s disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that doesn’t have a cure. It fools my immune system into attacking my digestive system, resulting in what I can only describe as the attempted birth of my intestines through my butthole. It’s a cruel and often debilitating disease. Since that first hospital stay, I’ve had colonoscopies, biopsies, CT scans, X-rays, blood and stool tests, enemas, suppositories, rectal foams, antiemetics, antidiarrheals, antivirals, antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, opiates, steroids, immunoglobulin, biologics and three fecal transplants (if you want to hear a story about my 9-year-old poop donor and a blender, find me on Twitter). My disease is managed now thanks to an expensive drug called infliximab, but the future is unpredictable. IBD works in patterns of flares and remissions, and little is known about what causes either. When I was diagnosed, I didn’t know how much my life would change. There’s no conversation about that foggy space between the common cold and terminal cancer, where illness won’t go away but won’t kill you, so none of us know what “chronic illness” means until we’re thrown into being sick […]

Read More →

Iditarod 2019 — MyLifeasaPhotographer

Saturday, March 2 was the 111th Iditarod held in Anchorage Alaska. Well, the opening ceremony that is; all the racers assemble in downtown Anchorage for the opening ceremony and then one-by-one mush to the airport where the dogs get put away until Sunday where the race officially starts in Willow AK. This year was an […] via Iditarod 2019 — MyLifeasaPhotographer

Read More →

1 in 6 Special Message From Anthony Edwards

Dear 1in6 Family, I wanted to take a moment and send a personal note to share a powerful and moving experience from this past week. On Wednesday, I had the incredible honor of joining an audience of survivors of sexual abuse, as well as others whose lives have been impacted, for a special screening of the two-part documentary “Leaving Neverland,” which will premiere this Sunday, March 3rd and Monday the 4th on HBO. The documentary introduces two incredible men, both survivors of sexual abuse, Wade Robson and James Safechuck. As a leading national organization helping male-identifying survivors of sexual abuse and assault, 1in6 both provided feedback to HBO on the effect of airing this powerful documentary, and recommended resources for survivors. Through this relationship, 1in6 was invited to participate in the taping of a television special, “Oprah Winfrey Presents: After Neverland,” immediately following the screening. As many television specials do, it all came together in a matter of days. Matthew Ennis, 1in6 President & Chief Executive Officer, reached out and asked if I would briefly share my story with Oprah and the audience. A short time later, Matthew and I joined over 150 fellow survivors and their guests in a theatre near New York’s Times Square for the taping. The cavernous room was filled with a positive energy I will not soon forget. Oprah, who has been a lifelong supporter of survivors and the complexities of their stories, brought us all together for an honest and probing discussion of abuse. […]

Read More →

What is Agoraphobia? — The Psych Talk

Agoraphobia is a very complex phobia usually manifesting itself as a collection of inter-linked conditions. For example many agoraphobics also fear being left alone (monophobia), dislike being in any situation where they feel trapped (exhibiting claustrophobia type tendencies) and fear travelling away from their ‘safe’ place, usually the home. Signs and Symptoms: Typical agoraphobia symptoms […] via What is Agoraphobia? — The Psych Talk

Read More →

Stream of Consciousness Saturday #SoSC “Cele”

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “cele-.” Find a word that starts with or contains “cele” and use it any way you’d like. Enjoy! Celebrate good times, come on!!!!!!! Join us for the fun and sharing good media stories   For more on the Stream of Consciousness Saturday, visit Linda Hill’s blog. Here’s the link: https://lindaghill.com Here are the rules for SoCS: 1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write. 2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop. 3. There will be a prompt every week. I will post the prompt here on my blog on Friday, along with a reminder for you to join in. The prompt will be one random thing, but it will not be a subject. For instance, I will not say “Write about dogs”; the prompt will be more like, “Make your first sentence a question,” “Begin with the word ‘The’,” or simply a single word to get your started. 4. Ping back! It’s important, so that I and other people can come and read your post! For example, in your post you can write “This post is part of SoCS:” and […]

Read More →

Friday Quote

  Courtesy of Good Reads    “You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” ― Mae West   “Insanity is doing the same thing, over and over again, but expecting different results.” ― Narcotics Anonymous   “Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog it’s too dark to read.” […]

Read More →

Genetics of insomnia more similar to psychiatric conditions than to other sleep traits

February 25, 2019 By 23andMe under 23andMe Research   We’ve always known that getting enough sleep is important and can have a significant impact on one’s health, but scientists have just begun to unravel the genetics behind why some people are more prone to sleep problems. Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder. About 30 percent of adults report short term problems, while about 10 percent report chronic insomnia. It’s also the second most common mental disorder. Recently, 23andMe collaborated with researchers from VU University Amsterdamand Netherlands Institute for Neuroscienceon one of the largest genome-wide analysis studies to identify genes associated with insomnia. Published in the journal Nature Genetics, the study used data from more than 1.3 million consenting research volunteers from the 23andMe database and the UK Biobank. “Our study shows that insomnia, like so many other neuropsychiatric disorders, is influenced by 100’s of genes, each of small effect,” said Guus Smit, a VU-University neurobiologist involved in the study. “These genes by themselves are not that interesting to look at. What counts is their combined effect on the risk of insomnia. We investigated that with a new method, which enabled us to identify specific types of brain cells, like the so-called medium spiny neurons.” Study Size The sheer size of this research cohort enabled us to ask questions about genetics of insomnia and its relationships with other conditions and sleep-related problems individuals may face. With this large dataset, researchers […]

Read More →

Zechstein Magnesium Chloride Mother Earth’s 250 Million Year Old Healing Treasure

Last week Fighting With Fibro  shared a cream that worked on her Fibromyalgia pain. It was a magnesium based product, being curious I had to understand the difference of the type she purchased. The magic word is Zechstein, many products claimed to relieve pain and a host of other problems but they didn’t have Zechstein included in ingredients. https://fightingwithfibro.com/2019/02/19/finally-something-that-actually-works-for-my-fibro-and-rls-pain/ I could not find the […]

Read More →

I Am Not…..I Am

I Am Not  Chronic Lyme Fibromyalgia Dementia Neuropathy Agrophobic Shut-in Over-focused on illness Stagnate Guilty Hopeless Looking for sympathy I am A Women Wife Dog mother Sister Determined Honest Caring to a fault Loving Scared Have high goals Living with symptoms Strong willed Open minded Writer Student Not a player Which one do you like? 

Read More →

Why Yoga? 6 Steps to Relieve Anxious Moods Naturally

  By Donna C. Moss Last updated: 11 Feb 2019 I’m anxious. Anxious traveler. Anxious driver. Anxious mother. There I said it. It was only when I found yoga with psychotherapy that I could regulate it on the spot. Now I use mind/body approaches in all my work. Why? Science has shown that the body keeps the score. Google anxiety, google yoga. The breathe complements our nervous systems. Calm the breathe and you calm your mind. Do a child’s pose. Legs up the wall, forward fold, butterfly, mountain and alternate nostril breathing. Then see if your body is more relaxed. You can do this right in the session. Now summon that deep relaxation each time you need it. Yoga, a centuries old practice, takes the focus on your breathe to the places that scare you. I remember the first time I tried yoga, I almost passed out. The teacher came over not too gently and said, you’re actually not breathing. I was mortified. But it was true. Every time I bent my head down I came up dizzy, probably due to shallow breathing. This was the beginning of my ten year yoga journey. I am now 200 hour yin yoga trained. It beats drugs and alcohol by a long shot. It actually teaches the cells of our bodies to be less reactive and more flexible. The very thing we need in this chaotic world. If you hold the poses just […]

Read More →

Depression Affects 15% of New Moms. A New Guideline Could Help Prevent It

TIME By JAMIE DUCHARME February 13, 2019 A new recommendation from a group of independent experts convened by the government could help more new and expecting mothers avoid depression, one of the most common complications of pregnancy and childbirth. The recommendation is the first from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) on preventing perinatal depression, which strikes during pregnancy or after childbirth and affects almost 15% of new mothers. The guideline states that clinicians, namely primary care providers, should provide counseling services, or references to them, to all pregnant and postpartum women at increased risk of perinatal depression. The guidance could help prevent mental health issues in this vulnerable population, and prompt more insurance providers to cover counseling services for pregnant and postpartum women. After reviewing the relevant research, the USPSTF specifically recommended that at-risk women try cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which focuses on changing a person’s thoughts to change how they feel, or interpersonal therapy, which focuses on building relationship skills. Those at heightened risk of depression include single, young and lower-income mothers, people with a history of depression and women showing depressive symptoms including low energy and mood. The proactive focus of the recommendations is important, says Jeff Temple, a psychologist in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Texas Medical Branch, who was not involved with the task force. Past USPSTF recommendations have focused on screening for existing depression among all adults, including […]

Read More →

How to Stop Being Irritable — The Psych Talk

Everyone experiences irritability at some point in their lives but for some people, it can become problematic and affect their relationships and personal well-being. In this case, there are many things you can do in order to reduce your levels of irritability and have more productive encounters with others. Avoid triggers and Change Environments: Removing […] via How to Stop Being Irritable — The Psych Talk

Read More →

Powerlifter Lifts 2-Ton SUV Off Man Trapped Underneath #WATWB

  February 19, 2019 A powerlifter in Michigan is being hailed as a real-life superhero after his quick actions helped save a man pinned under a rolled over vehicle. Ryan Belcher, 29, was preparing to leave work last Thursday when he heard a loud crash outside his workplace. He noticed an SUV flipped upside down, and he rushed outside toward the wreckage. Ryan said there was a man trapped under the vehicle begging for help. Belcher, who is 350 pounds and can deadlift over 800 pounds, recalled thinking at the time, “this is where I need to be. All the training I’ve been through… this is the time where it’s really going to pay off.” But the Jeep Cherokee he was about to try and lift weighed roughly two tons. “I just jumped right in,” Belcher told Fox News. “I seen a window that was broken out of the back of the vehicle and I knew if I can swing the vehicle in a certain direction I can free him from that pole. So, I just stuck my arms in and I don’t know I just grabbed it, lifted it up and started pushing and all I heard was that’s enough we can get him.” The man Belcher saved and another woman suffered serious injuries in the crash. No fatalities were reported. On Sunday, Belcher went to the hospital to visit the man he helped rescue. “I got to meet […]

Read More →

Today In History February 21

1599 Shakespeare leases marshland on the Thames River William Shakespeare joins seven other men in signing a lease on a Southwark lot along the Thames. The playwright now owns a share in what will become the Globe Theatre, where some of his most memorable plays will first be staged, including ‘Julius Caesar,’ ‘Macbeth,’ ‘Othello,’ ‘King Lear,’ and ‘Hamlet.’   1804 […]

Read More →

Male Trauma Survivor’s

OF NOTE Facilitating Male Trauma Survivors’ Meaningful Involvement in Health Research   Sexual abuse is an international problem and an often overlooked public health issue for men and boys. Given the prevalence of trauma and its well-documented connection to mental and physical health disorders, the relevance of male survivor input and engagement in healthcare research is profound.   With funding […]

Read More →

U.S. Pain Foundation Ambassador Network

Last week I joined the U.S. Pain Foundation Ambassador Program. The work the organization does for people with chronic pain is hands-on and at a government level. There are endless opportunities for you to support the organization with the time you have available. I have to learn how to do screenshots on MAC OS quickly, I’m attending a Webinar on Thursday.  Melinda Dear Junior Ambassador, I would like to personally welcome you into the U.S. Pain family! By joining our Pain Ambassador Network, you are taking action and choosing to help us advocate on behalf of the pain community. Our goal is to support you and provide you with the tools needed to raise awareness. The U.S. Pain Foundation is a nonprofit organization created by people with pain for people with pain. We want the experiences you have as a junior ambassador to be full of fun and excitement. Our mission is to educate, connect, empower, and advocate for pain warriors as well as their families, caregivers, and friends; the hard work and dedication of ambassadors like you is what allows us to fulfill this mission. We greatly appreciate the time, energy, and passion that you have chosen to dedicate towards raising awareness! To thank you for your commitment as a volunteer, we will be sending you a starter package in the mail. We encourage you to use these resources to empower yourself. As a junior ambassador, we would also like […]

Read More →

Love the news but hate clickbait and fluff? Here’s how to get more quality and less quantity

Ideas.Ted.com Feb 5, 2019 / Cal Newport Digital minimalist Cal Newport shows how you can turn off the information firehose and follow current events on your own terms. Are you ready to join the attention resistance? In 2010, a trio of Germans with backgrounds in sociology, technology and market research posted a document titled “Das Slow Media Manifest” (the English translation is “The Slow Media Manifesto”). Following the Slow Foodmovement — which promotes local food and cuisine as an alternative to fast food — the Slow Media Manifesto notes that the first decade of the 21st century “brought profound changes to the technological foundations of the media landscape.” The second decade, it proposes, should be dedicated to figuring out the “appropriate reaction.” Their suggestion: We can embrace the concept of “slow.” In an age in which the digital attention economy is shoveling more and more clickbait toward us and fragmenting our focus into emotionally charged shards, the right response is to become more mindful in our media consumption. The Slow Media movement is still mostly European; in the US, the response has proved more puritanical. Whereas the Europeans suggest transforming media consumption into a high‑quality experience, Americans have tended to embrace the “low information diet”: a concept popularized by author Tim Ferriss, in which you aggressively eliminate sources of news and information to reclaim time for other pursuits. Much like the American approach to healthy eating, it focuses on eliminating […]

Read More →

Stream of Consciousness Saturday #SoSC “YAWN”

  Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “yawn” Have fun!     Shaggy drives me crazy when he wakes me up only to yawn and go back to sleep.  M Join us for the fun and sharing good media stories   For more on the Stream of Consciousness Saturday, visit Linda Hill’s blog. Here’s the link: https://lindaghill.com/2019/01/18/the-friday-reminder-for-socs-jusjojan-2019-daily-prompt-jan-19th/ […]

Read More →

Is Your Perfume Poisoning You? — Talk Health With Alex

I’m a perfume wearer and I’ll definitely tell you that it smells good but the million dollar question is “Is it Toxic?” Perfumes tend to draw on essential oils in their formulations, but also include a number of chemicals (many known and probable carcinogens) that can outrightly cause a lot of health hazards. Fragrance is […] via Is Your Perfume Poisoning You? — Talk Health With Alex

Read More →

Valentines Day In History Feburary 14th

Saint Valentine is martyred The Catholic Church tells of a Bishop Valentine who, in part because he married couples without Imperial Rome’s consent, is imprisoned, tortured, and beheaded on this day. He will eventually become the patron saint of love. Captain James Cook killed in Hawaii After exploring and mapping vast areas of the globe, including the Hawaiian Islands, the […]

Read More →

MANAGING FIBROMYALGIA IN CHILDREN

Welcome to Remedy, a blog by U.S. Pain Foundation. Remedy aims to provide people with the support they need to thrive despite chronic pain. It features the information about promising treatments, tips and strategies for self-management, resources for coping with the emotional and social effects of pain, unique perspectives from patients, clinicians, and caregivers–and much more. To submit an article idea, email contact@uspainfoundation.org. Posted: January 14, 2019   By Brent Wells, DC, a chiropractor and founder of Better Health Chiropractic and Physical Rehab If your child feels tired and achy, you may not worry initially. After all, there’s nothing urgent about what seems to be mild, general discomfort. However, if your child is constantly in pain, exhausted, having trouble sleeping, and experiencing intense moods, he/she may have fibromyalgia. This condition is fairly common in adults, but parents and clinicians may overlook the possibility of juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome — that is, fibromyalgia in children. JUVENILE FIBROMYALGIA SYMPTOMS TO WATCH OUT FOR Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by pain and fatigue. According to experts, children will often describe this pain as “stiffness, tightness, tenderness, burning or aching.” This pain can last for months and is often accompanied by other symptoms that affect a child’s overall well-being, energy level, and emotional health, including: Tender spots on muscles Difficulty sleeping and fatigue Aches, including stomachaches and headaches Lack of focus or memory Anxiety and depression If your child is experiencing these symptoms, you should […]

Read More →

Camille Pissarro​ One of My Favs

Originally posted on For the Love of Art:
It is strange that most of Camille Pissarro’s artwork I don’t care for. Landscapes, people working in fields, there all very nice but don’t have as much interest as Boulivorde Martmontre Avenue at Night, 1897. This piece draws me into all the different brush strokes, nothing clearly defined yet perfectly understand. I can feel the excitement of people bustling around on a brisk night. His use of reflections is the icing on the cake. Thank you for coming by to see on my favorite Impressionist/Post Impressionist artist Camille Pissarro. CAMILLE PISSARRO (July 10, 1830 – November 13, 1903) Camille Pissarro (July 10, 1830 – November 13, 1903) was a French Impressionist painter. His importance resides not only in his visual contributions to Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, but also in his patriarchal standing among his colleagues, particularly Paul Cezanne and Paul Gauguin. Jacob-Abraham-Camille Pissarro was born in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, to Abraham Gabriel Pissarro, a Portuguese Sephardic Jew, and Rachel Manzana-Pomie, from the Dominican Republic. Pissarro lived in St. Thomas until age 12, when he went to a boarding school in Paris. He returned to St. Thomas where he drew in his free time. Pissarro was attracted to political anarchy, an attraction that may have originated during his years in St. Thomas.

Read More →

Georgia O’Keeffe in North Carolina by da-AL — Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

What a great time my husband and I had visiting our dear friend David Hunt in North Carolina. He’s posted on Happiness Between Tails here and here. We hadn’t seen him in way too long — all the more reason that my recent discovery of the touching PBS series, “We’ll Meet Again,” gets me blubbering. […] via Georgia O’Keeffe in North Carolina by da-AL — Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

Read More →

Stream of Consciousness Saturday #SoSC

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “ends with -ly.” Start your post with any adverb that ends in “-ly.” Bonus points if you end with an adverb too. Have fun! Hardly the winter I expected, marching in so boldly. My dementia is bad today, had to look up adverb. Hope I hit the mark. Have a great weekend.  M   Join us for the fun and sharing good media stories   For more on the Stream of Consciousness Saturday, visit Linda Hill’s blog. Here’s the link: https://lindaghill.com/2019/01/18/the-friday-reminder-for-socs-jusjojan-2019-daily-prompt-jan-19th/ Here are the rules for SoCS: 1. Your post must be stream of consciousness writing, meaning no editing, (typos can be fixed) and minimal planning on what you’re going to write. 2. Your post can be as long or as short as you want it to be. One sentence – one thousand words. Fact, fiction, poetry – it doesn’t matter. Just let the words carry you along until you’re ready to stop. 3. There will be a prompt every week. I will post the prompt here on my blog on Friday, along with a reminder for you to join in. The prompt will be one random thing, but it will not be a subject. For instance, I will not say “Write about dogs”; the prompt will be more like, “Make your first sentence a question,” “Begin with the word ‘The’,” or simply a single word to get your started. 4. […]

Read More →

Fibro Friday: Hamster Wheel

Repost I’ve struggled with Chronic Lyme, Fibromyalgia, and Dementia for six years, every week it’s a follow-up or test for the latest ailment. I’ve made the decision to step off the Doctor Hamster Wheel in 2019. I saw a Rheumatologist two months ago, the clueless PA told me there wasn’t Lyme in Texas. REALLY? The doctor named a few possible illnesses and took my blood. The doctor’s visit was a bust but the lab work revealed my Calcium is high. Which can cause serious complications? She suggested having my Parathyroid checked. WOW, something came out of the lab work, I have another ailment to deal with! I saw the Endocrinologist, it was straight forward. A blood test, a scan at the hospital and possible surgery. We scheduled the scan immediately since it was affecting my heart. I fell down the stairs and banged myself up a good one. I landed a perfect 10! NO, I can’t lean my head back for two forty-five minute sessions. The test was rescheduled. 2019 is starting like the other six years, with a heart test scheduled, a Parathyroid scan with possible surgery, and a test for Traumatic Brain Injury from the fall. There are a few days left in 2018, I want to know who I am, how have I changed in that time. I developed Agoraphobia, haven’t driven in six years and have only seen the inside of doctor’s offices. I took the first step […]

Read More →

Today in History February 6th

1812 Earthquake causes Mississippi River to flow backwards The last of four massive earthquakes that began the previous December strikes in what will be the state of Missouri with a force strong enough to spawn a fluvial tsunami, causing the mighty Mississippi River to run backwards for many hours.   1935 Beloved board game Monopoly debuts Parker Brothers begins selling […]

Read More →

Celebrity Friday Quotes

“Too many people are buying things they can’t afford, with money that they don’t have… to impress people that they don’t like!” Nothing to do w/ “books” — Just like the quote!” ― Will Smith   “I don’t like to share my personal life… it wouldn’t be personal if I shared it.” ― George Clooney   “What’s the whole point […]

Read More →

[Wellness Wednesday] The Importance Of Lifelong Learning — Reclaiming HOPE

Welcome back to Wellness Wednesday everyone! This week I thought we could talk a little about the importance of continuing to learn throughout our lives. Sometimes we tend to think of learning only in the context of formal education, but the truth is that more learning takes place outside of the classroom than it does […] via [Wellness Wednesday] The Importance Of Lifelong Learning — Reclaiming HOPE

Read More →

Diversity Matters in Research

By 23andMe on Fri, 01 Feb 2019 17:49:06 Africans and African Americans are among the most underrepresented populations in genetic health research, yet they face some of the most daunting health outcomes.   It’s a bitter irony of the current state of research that among those most in need are the least served by our ever-expanding genetic knowledge. Africans, African Americans, as well as Latinos, still make up less than four percent of individuals included in genome-wide association studies, according to a recent study. Genetic Diversity This despite the fact that Africans and people of African ancestry are more genetically diverse than all other populations in the world combined. This is because humans originated in Africa and have lived there continuously for more than 200,000 years, adapting to the varied climates and regions. The rest of the world was populated by small groups of people who first migrated out of Africa some 60,000 to 130,000 years ago. In genetics this is called the Founder Effect. Including people of African ancestry in genetic study will likely uncover unique genetic variation that help scientists better understand conditions that affect people of African ancestry, who thus far have not benefited from many of the breakthroughs in genetic science. Yielding Results 23andMe’s efforts to improve diversity in its research has yielded results. The most promising is that we now have one of the largest groups, if not the largest, group of African Americans who […]

Read More →

Bloques de carreteras en la vida

Todos golpeamos las carreteras en la vida, algunas semanas duraderas, otros años. Para sobrevivir a la paliza que tiene que permanecer centrado en los pasos hacia adelante, incluso los pasos nano están avanzando. Tuve la suerte, el abuso, el trauma y el odio propio comenzaron cuando era muy joven. Crecí oyendo lo estúpido que me convencí de que era verdad. […]

Read More →

When a Patient Dies by Suicide — The Physician’s Silent Sorrow

New England Journal of Medicine January 24, 2019 Dinah Miller, M.D. We talk about the toll suicide takes on families and the tragedy for the people who’ve died. What we don’t openly talk about is suicide’s toll on the doctors who have treated these patients. But when a patient dies by suicide, it leaves us profoundly changed. The news came by text as we drove home from brunch. My patient had died that morning by suicide. I read the text and wailed. My husband was driving, and our adult children happened to be away, traveling together on an exotic journey. I struggled to gather words, and my husband held control of the car through those excruciating moments when he thought something horrible had happened to our kids. I calmed down enough to tell him that the tragedy involved a patient. He was relieved. I was not. U.S. suicide rates increased by 25.4% between 1999 and 2016.1 It’s been estimated that at least half of psychiatrists will lose at least one patient to suicide during their career.2 There are no estimates on how many primary care physicians will have the same experience, though they often treat psychiatric disorders. Among people who complete suicide in the United States, 46% have been diagnosed with a mental health condition, and many more people have undiagnosed mental illness. We talk about the toll suicide takes on families. They experience grief, guilt, regret, anguish, anger, and stigma, […]

Read More →