Mental Health Haven: 4 Ways To Create One In Your Home

It’s an unfortunate fact that many people are not able to get the mental health support they need. Unfortunately, this can lead to feelings of isolation and loneliness, making physical and mental health worse. But you don’t have to let this happen. There are four easy ways that anyone can create a haven for themselves inside their home, no matter how big or small it may be. You’ll feel better after reading this article on how to do it.

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Let In the Natural Light

The natural light of the sun can have a significant impact on your mood. Unfortunately, you may spend so much time looking at screens that it’s essential to find ways to let in as much nature and sunlight as possible. 

Consider renovating your house with the help of home builders to accommodate natural light through large windows, skylights, and other features.

Open up curtains during daylight hours, keep windows open when you’re home, or try using an app like flux to reduce the effects of electronics on your sleep cycle.

Do you use artificial light after dark? Consider using a small candle or lamp instead, and opt for warmer lighting like candles. Lighting that is too bright can cause tension headaches.

Natural light is best for helping to balance out hormone levels during the winter months, which is a good time for restoring serotonin levels in your brain. Consequently, this helps you manage anxiety at home, stress, and other discomforts. 

No matter how you do it, make sure that you get some natural light! 

Make Your Bed a Sacred Place

Your bed is a sacred place, so why not make it as cozy and comfortable as possible? You can do this by stretching out your body to create an energy of openness. This will help you avoid feeling closed off or trapped at night when going to sleep. 

Claim a Personal Space

Claim a personal space and make it your own. Make this area the place where you recharge, whether that’s sitting in silence or by reading a book. This is also an excellent spot for therapy dogs to hang out when they’re visiting. 

If you have trouble getting started with decluttering, ask someone else for help setting up a donation box. By donating the things you no longer use, it feels like you’re shedding your old self and embracing your new one – just what mental health needs.

Make It Clean

If you live in a mess, your brain will never be at peace. Cleaning up is not just about the dirt and dust; it’s also about the mental clutter that affects your mood. The process of decluttering clears away space for mindful reflection and self-care.

It feels good to have a place where everything has a place. Therefore, living in a clean and organized area is good for your brain. 

Conclusion

There is no right or wrong answer to the question: “What does mental health look like?” It looks different for every person. For some people, it means going outside and exercising in nature. For others, it may mean spending time with a friend over coffee at their favorite cafe. So, do what makes sense for you and helps uplift your mental health.

This is a collaborative post.

Melinda

 

4 comments

  1. Reblogged this on Walking the Rails and commented:
    It is fact that disability may lead to emotional instability. And it that is all that you get out of it, consider yourself fortunate. Where I see sometime greater damage than that resulting from disability is what it does to a body’s sense of self. Yes, disability can do nasty stuff to the brain.

    It is the only one that you have, take care of it. There are some good ideas here to get you started. Try one on, see if it fits. Take what works and make it a great one. For you.

    Liked by 1 person

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