Book Review Navigating Loneliness By Cheryl Rickman

I was kindly gifted an advanced copy of Navigating Loneliness-How to Connect with Yourself and Others, A Mental Health Handbook by Cheryl Rickman from Maddie Kirby-Dunne at Welbeck Publishing Group for an honest review. Thank you, Maddie.

About the Author

Cheryl Rickman is a qualified Positive Psychology Practitioner and Sunday Times bestselling author and ghostwriter of twenty self-help, wellbeing and business books.

After her parents’ lives were cut short, Cheryl decided to devote her life to helping others make the most of their own precious lives through the books she writes.

She specializes in writing practical books to help people fret less and flourish more, and is a Wellbeing Ambassador for the Network of Wellbeing.

Having qualified with a Certificate in Applied Positive Psychology in 2016, Cheryl also runs wellbeing retreats and delivers workshops on acceptance, balance and compassion, The ABC of FlourishingTM.

Cheryl lives with her husband, daughter and two dogs in a country cottage in Hampshire, UK. She is an unashamed tree- hugger and nature-lover, has an overflowing bookshelf and her favourite colour is rainbow. She loves pizza and the seaside, but is not a fan of mushrooms or spiders.

You can find out more at http://www.CherylRickman.co.uk

OTHER WELLBEING BOOKS BY THIS AUTHOR

Be More Wonder Woman: Fearless Thinking from a Warrior Princess

(DK, 2020)

The Flourish Colouring Book: Art Therapy Mindfulness

(CreateSpace, 2015)

The Flourish Handbook: How to Achieve Happiness with Staying Power, Boost Your Well-Being, Enjoy Life More and Reach Your Potential (CreateSpace, 2013)

The Happiness Bible: An Ultimate Guide to Sustainable Wellbeing

(Godsfield Press, 2019)

The Little Book of Resilience (Gaia, 2019)

The Little Book of Serenity (Gaia, 2020)

May You Be Well: Everyday Good Vibes for the Spiritual (Pyramid, 2021)

You Are Enough: Embrace Your Flaws and Be Happy Being You

(Summersdale, 2021)

Blurb

Navigating Loneliness is part of a Trigger Publishing series of books about managing mental health issues. Throughout this book you’ll learn what actions you can take to tackle the main causes of loneliness and reduce it.

First, you’ll be shown how to rethink loneliness and explore the benefits of solitude so that, once better connected with yourself and others, you can see it in a positive light and reap the benefits.

Next you will learn how to connect with yourself so you are able to enjoy and value your own company.

Finally, you will learn how to connect better with others so you can create at least one meaningful relationship with someone you can confide in.

In addition, there are several “compass points” which highlight especially useful or important information throughout, pointing you in the right direction, as it were. page16image63558912 page16image63559296 page16image63559872 page16image63557760 page16image63558336 page16image63558144 page16image63558720 page17image63446144 page17image63446336 page17image63446528 page17image63446720 page17image63446912page17image63447104

At the end of the book you will find signposts to further resources should you need to seek further professional help.

My hope is that after reading this book you will be able to take what you’ve learned to become sufficiently supported and happy enough in your own company that being alone doesn’t generate loneliness, rather that solitude is savoured and enjoyed as much as the increasingly meaningful connections you make with others.

My Thoughts

As a practising Psychologist and Sunday Times Best Selling Author, Cheryl’s book provides practical information and steps you can take to create more joy in your life. You don’t have to be lonely when alone. As she says, you can be in a room full of people and be lonely. 

One very important chapter in the book is How to Connect with Yourself. This chapter is a chance for self-reflection and how you think about loneliness. Cheryl uses her positive energy and experience to have you look at being alone differently. 

She also helps you take what you learn about yourself and apply it to meeting and connecting with others. This will also add more joy to your life. 

The book is a very fast read at only 155 pages long and includes helpful resources at the back of the book. 

Navigating Loneliness is a helpful tool to tweak your thinking about being alone and learning about yourself will help you connect better in your relationship with others. 

In the pandemic times, we are living in, it is quite normal to feel lonely and this book gets a big thumbs up in helping us see our way out of loneliness. I highly recommend you pick up a copy today and share it with your friends and loved ones. 

Welbeck Publishing Group

Welbeck Publishing Group is an exciting, fast-growing independent publisher based in London, dedicated to publishing only the very best and most commercial books spanning a number of genres and categories, from leading authors and well-known brands to debut talent. We live for books that entertain, excite and enhance the lives of readers around the world.

From building our boutique fiction and narrative non-fiction lists to shaping our world-renowned illustrated reference, gift and children’s titles, our aim is to be a market-leader in every category in which we publish.  Our books and products come to life for adults, children, and families in 30 languages in more than 60 countries around the world, selling through a variety of traditional and non-traditional channels. We are constantly looking for new ways to deliver our exceptional content and new ideas to inspire readers and listeners everywhere.

www.welbeckpublishing.com

Melinda

4 comments

  1. Melinda – this book review post was dense and well done!
    We have a nice background in the author and then the blurb and thoughts about the book really highlighted what a resource can be – especially in today’s culture where so many people are digitally connected but not truly connected to self and others.

    And side note / i really think positive psychology is misunderstood – even by some physiologists- and I have always though the field should be called “strengths-based psychology”
    ☀️💚📚

    Liked by 1 person

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