Endometriosis Awareness Month

National Endometriosis Awareness Month was an initiation taken by The Endometriosis Association in 1993. This month is observed worldwide through various activities that involve educating people about the condition, fundraising, and marches. Yellow ribbons and brochures are distributed worldwide to honor National Endometriosis Awareness Month.

 

 

 

 Endometriosis is an inflammatory condition where endometrial tissue (tissue similar to the lining of the uterus) grows outside of the uterus. It is estimated that 1 in 10 women have endometriosis (Zondervan 2020). Endometriosis frequently presents with the symptom of pain including dysmenorrhoea (painful periods), dyspareunia (pain during sexual intercourse), and chronic pelvic or abdominal pain. Endometriosis can cause infertility and for women with subfertility the prevalence rate ranges from 25% to 40% (Ozkan 2008).

The causes of endometriosis are uncertain, but several factors such as genetics, retrograde period flow, (where blood flows back into the pelvis instead of out of the body,) immune system disorders, and hormones are possible influencers.

Treatment ranges from symptom management with pain medication and hormone therapy such as oral contraceptives to surgical treatment. Conservative surgery involves removing the misplaced endometrial tissue while preserving the uterus, though in severe cases a hysterectomy may be performed.

Endometriosis can have a devastating effect on the quality of life of individuals suffering from this disorder and can have a huge impact on their physical, mental, and social well-being.

Before my hysterectomy from Cervical Cancer, I suffered from Endometriosis, it was horrible. I started my period when I was nine and by 12 years old I was in excruciating pain and started taking pain pills. This went on for another 19 years. I’ve been pain-free since my hysterectomy

Melinda

Reference:

https://www.cochrane.org/news/endometriosis-awareness-month-2022

https://nationaltoday.com/national-endometriosis-awareness-month/

4 comments

    1. I hope she takes meds to help, I don’t know what’s on the market but by now hopefully, there’s something more than pain meds. I think they can also do some laser surgery if I’m not mistaken, no hysterectomy is needed. I could be wrong.

      Liked by 1 person

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